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Was out the other day past one of the non etholnol stations. Big ole "closed" sign and for sale in window. So the other 2 that have the straight fuel are like a fuel distribution wharhouse. They are only open like 8am to 4 or 5 pm. So adds a bit more to the PIA. Guess I could take a couple fuel cans down and fill them up every other week.
 

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I'm lost at to why higher elevation is requiring higher octane gas. When I used to drag race motorcycles higher elevation meant we could run more blower boost and bump the timing because the effective compression ratio at 5,000 due to lack of oxygen lowered the CR 1 full point. Our 9.5 CR are operating at 8.5 at 5,000 feet. lower CR lowers the need for higher octane.

Less oxygen means higher octane fuel burns cooler. At sea level 91 octane in a Vic equates to elevated engine temps, or so I have read. I am not an expert on this... I do know in my snowbike if I ran 110 octane at sea level I would likely cook the motor, at 7500 ft VP 110 octane runs awesome. I also know the guys that run turbo'd snowbike's turn the boost up at elevation... It's all relative to the amount of oxygen in the air at elevation. That's all I know... Oh and I also know that it takes a really big dog to **** a moose.
 

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To me stations that sell non ethanol gas seems to have one hose for each grade of gas. I have ask one station if you only have one hose how much different grade of gas am I getting.
You can download prue gas app to your phone.
I run 89 octane constantly and have wheel set at +3 no problems. But we only have medium hills around here. I have been told when running mountains and desert country I should use 91 octane. I have been told 93 octane creates more motor heat and not worth the money.

this is not the app its just there web site
Ethanol-free gas stations in the U.S. and Canada
The gas station where I just got my first tank of 89 octane ethanol free has it coming out of a different hose than the ethanol tainted gas. Maybe it will take away some of the heat that roasts me while riding down here.
 

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Less oxygen means higher octane fuel burns cooler. At sea level 91 octane in a Vic equates to elevated engine temps, or so I have read. I am not an expert on this... I do know in my snowbike if I ran 110 octane at sea level I would likely cook the motor, at 7500 ft VP 110 octane runs awesome. I also know the guys that run turbo'd snowbike's turn the boost up at elevation... It's all relative to the amount of oxygen in the air at elevation. That's all I know... Oh and I also know that it takes a really big dog to **** a moose.
That's why I made my comment. It's factually based. 91 octane at see level would burn cooler than 87. Less oxygen in the air means that the A/F ratio can be leaner. At elevation the air contains less oxygen so a carbureted engine would run richer or cooler to a point. I'm just questioning why some believe they need higher octane in higher elevation. The exact opposite it true. When you start running out of oxygen the need for premium decreases. Effective compression ratios of 8.5 in elevation because the air is thinner require only 87 octane.
 

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Unleaded fuels are very "dry". I feel like the fuel pump needs some lubrication, so I will put an ounce in each fill-up of Marvel's Mystery Oil just for GP.
I drive a diesel truck and while back I found a study done on the most common diesel fuel additives for "lubricity" and cetane improvement. That study showed that MMO made diesel fuel worse, or less lubricating. I cannot imagine it would do any better for gasoline.


Lubricity Additive Study Results - Diesel Place : Chevrolet and GMC Diesel Truck Forums
 

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Yesterday I put 89 octane ethanol free gas into my bike. It doesn't seem to be running any different, however, it feels like it isn't running as hot. The verdict is still out though. I've only ridden it to and from work. The real test is if I ride it up to Savannah tomorrow after work.
 

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In NY and some other parts of the northeast, most of the Stewarts convenience stores switched their high-test pumps (hose for each pump) to ethanol-free a year or so ago. I tend to gas up at Stewarts because of that, and because there are a lot of them.

There's a free Apple and Android app, Pure Gas, if you have a smartphone and want to locate the nearest one. See Ethanol-free gas stations in the U.S. and Canada for details. It works fine on my iPhone.

I absolutely go my nearby Stewarts for that E0 gas when filling up my gas cans for my lawnmower and snowblower. And I add StarTron to the containers, too. You don't want separation and gumming in gas tanks of stuff that doesn't get used for months at a time. (I used to use StaBil, 20 or so years ago, and then SeaFoam for a while, but the last few years I've switched over to StarTron for stabilization and anti-separation purposes.)

I treat the XCT the same way as the yard power stuff when it comes time for winter storage: E0 and StarTron. If I'm wrong, and some nice days pop up in Oct or Nov, then rinse and repeat.
 

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I have know a couple fellows that drain the fuel tanks when storing for winter. I dont have that problem, but I tried to tell them they were probably better off filling up and conditioning the fuel. It helps keep condensation out of tank and therefore rust.
 

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I have know a couple fellows that drain the fuel tanks when storing for winter. I dont have that problem, but I tried to tell them they were probably better off filling up and conditioning the fuel. It helps keep condensation out of tank and therefore rust.
I'm with you there. For the winter, I top off the tank about three miles from home (each time I think I'm done for the year).

I think the drain-the-tank system goes way back, when there was no hope of stabilizing gas well, so you wouldn't have gummed-up carb jets in the Spring. As I understand things (always questionable), if you have stabilized gas, it's better for O-rings and suchlike, because they won't dry out.
 

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I'm with you there. For the winter, I top off the tank about three miles from home (each time I think I'm done for the year).



I think the drain-the-tank system goes way back, when there was no hope of stabilizing gas well, so you wouldn't have gummed-up carb jets in the Spring. As I understand things (always questionable), if you have stabilized gas, it's better for O-rings and suchlike, because they won't dry out.

Agreed you never want to leave a fuel tank empty and exposed to oxygen. The same goes for your fuel lines, injectors,etc... Top off with fuel close to house and add seafoam.
 

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gas tanks are seal coated to prevent rust. When you leave them dry the seal coat can start deteriorating. Keeping it full is smart
 

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Having spent the better part of the last decade working for a small oil company here in Wyoming I'll add my 2¢ worth to the discussion...

Over the counter fuel additives have only one requirement, that they do not violate EPA standards for emissions, period end of story. What's in them and what they do is a mystery even to the marketing people who work for the companies that make them. Long story short, don't waste your money.

Having said that, Sea Foam is not a performance additive but a stabilization additive and yes it does work but using it on a daily basis will likely net you no discernible benefits. Pretty much about every oil change I'll dump an entire can of Sea Foam in the tank and run it through just on general principle. Does it do any good?? Who knows, but it gives me that warm fuzzy feeling so I do it.

The best additive that you can introduce to your fuel system is using Top Tier branded fuels i.e. Exxon, Shell, Texaco, Conoco etc. Each oil company has its own proprietary additive package that has been thoroughly tested and approved of by not only Big Brother but the engine makers as well.

My experience has taught me that stock Victory engines aren't really happy campers on un-branded gasoline even without ethanol. I won't address modified engines simply because if you're trying to out smart the engineers you probably know more about fuels than me anyway. Running one tank of un-branded fuel (Circle K, Maverik, 7/11 etc.) you won't notice much if any difference in how your engine performs. After two or three tanks though you'll definitely begin to notice the hiccups, burps and farts that weren't there a few hundred miles ago.

Does ethanol blended fuel affect your mileage?? You bet, but it also depends upon the altitude. Down in Arizona at sea level in the winter I'm lucky to get mileage in the high 30's burning ethanol blended fuel. When I come back to Wyoming in the summer where I never drop below 5,000 MSL and burn only non-ethanol premium my mileages average the mid 40's. Why do I burn premium above 5,000 MSL? Because it's what I can get without ethanol and it doesn't hurt anything to be over on the octane that little amount. It's not like when we were burning leaded fuels and you could wind up with lead deposits on the valve faces causing a hot spot and eventually a burned valve. Our (stock) engines run so lean that the additional octane can and will reduce operating temperatures simply because it burns at a slower rate.

Regarding single hose fuel dispensers, get used to it. The gas stations, convenience stores, Walmarts and the like don't own the dispensers the oil company does. The trend over the last decade has been to replace multi hose dispensers with single hose units for cost savings, less valving etc. means a simpler dispenser less maintenance and more profit for the oil company.
 

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Thankfully we have an abundance of Ethanol Free stations where I live ranging from 89-93 octane. With 93 pure gas I seem to average about 2-3mpg more than running 87 blended. When I cannot get pure gas I keep a bottle of Lucas fuel stabilizer as an "additive".

I refuse to put any octane boost in my bikes I have seen too many long term negative effects on fuel systems. So as fellow XC/XCT owners are any of you getting any better performance or mileage with different fuels or additives?

Thanks and ride safe yall!:devil
I use to use, repeat use to use Lucas octane booster and noticed better performance. However after using this product for 4-5 tanks I checked my plugs (e3) and a yellow film was on the plug. use Top tier gas if ethanol free is not available.
 

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I believe Kevinx said running 89 was best. You only need 91 for desert and high mountain terrain. Any thing over 91 will varnish your valves and piston crate higher motor heat. As fas as better mileage that all could be in your right hand or temp and dew point of the day.
The factory say run 91 because there are to many that don't know what to do.

I will not start on the snake oil additives you can add to your gas and oil
I love the smell of an exhumed thread in the morning 🌄
Our standard compression ratios don't need octane boost.
I recently posted pics in the VOG showing the carbon deposits on my old Vegas pistons after running 60,000 miles on Premium Unleaded that is equivalent of USA 91
Can't find the pics in this phone or I'd put them up again.
High Octane burns slower actually and when used in a relatively low compression engine doesn't get completely burned.
Leaving carbon behind and blowing wasted power out the exhaust.
Fuel companies and additive companies would have you not believe this.
Some here get that fact .
Most don't.
Run the lowest octane that don't cause pinging.
That said it would take 200K miles for the carbon buildup from high Octane and boosters to actually cause problems.
 

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I love the smell of an exhumed thread in the morning 🌄
Our standard compression ratios don't need octane boost.
I recently posted pics in the VOG showing the carbon deposits on my old Vegas pistons after running 60,000 miles on Premium Unleaded that is equivalent of USA 91
Can't find the pics in this phone or I'd put them up again.
High Octane burns slower actually and when used in a relatively low compression engine doesn't get completely burned.
Leaving carbon behind and blowing wasted power out the exhaust.
Fuel companies and additive companies would have you not believe this.
Some here get that fact .
Most don't.
Run the lowest octane that don't cause pinging.
That said it would take 200K miles for the carbon buildup from high Octane and boosters to actually cause problems.
No disagreement from me on what you've pointed out (although I'm not an engineer, and never even played one on TV).

The only qualification I'd add to your remarks regards winter storage, as I mentioned earlier here. In my neck of the woods, you can only get non-ethanol in the high test gas, and only at a few stations (around here, Stewarts and Pit Stop). As I don't want any ethanol sitting around in the tank all winter, my last few fill-ups near the end of a season are at E0 premium grade pumps (and then I add some stabilizer, such as Star Tron).
 

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No disagreement from me on what you've pointed out (although I'm not an engineer, and never even played one on TV).

The only qualification I'd add to your remarks regards winter storage, as I mentioned earlier here. In my neck of the woods, you can only get non-ethanol in the high test gas, and only at a few stations (around here, Stewarts and Pit Stop). As I don't want any ethanol sitting around in the tank all winter, my last few fill-ups near the end of a season are at E0 premium grade pumps (and then I add some stabilizer, such as Star Tron).
Fair Enough...as we say Down Under.
We rarely get freezing or sub zero here except high up or way down south.
The only use I have for ethanol is for cleaning and dewatering metal that I've treated with phosphoric acid prior to etch priming.
I never put it in a fuel tank of my card or bikes.
And I quit drinking it 23 years ago.
 
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