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What is everyone paying to have tires changed at the dealer? This is assuming you take them the bike, drop it off and they do the tire change.

Here is what I was quoted.......$190.00 to replace both front and rear if I carry the tires in and ride the bike in.

$140.00 if I buy the tires from the dealer.

They asked me if I bought they bike there and I said no. I asked what the price would be if I bought the bike there and he didn't say.

I understand there is a little work getting these wheels/tires off these bikes, but $190 worth.....:(

They could not get metzlers, and the Bridgestones were way expensive.....even the dealer made a comment that they were rediculously priced. I hate the E3 stockers.
 

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I just spent two hours tightening my drive belt and getting it to track somewhat straight....LOL Maybe the $190 is the rate. He did say the difference in price was that they didn't charge to balance if the tires were bought there and they did if I carried them in.
 

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I don't fiddle with adjusting the belt, just support the rear wheel and knock out the rear axel. The front is a snap. I buy my tires, carry in my wheels and, in about 90 minutes, take them home. My local shop charges me $35 per wheel.

Ride safe.


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Local dealer quoted me $514 for a set of Bridgestones, installed. E3's were $570-something. It gets dropped off tomorrow.

I don't want to be bothered with taking the rear wheel off, so they can do it. I find the older I get, I have more $ than I do patience and time.
 

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2 options. I buy the tires online and either:

1) My friend has a tire machine and a balancer in his garage. I ride over there with the tires around my waist and changing them takes about an hour and costs nothing.

2) I pop the wheels off (takes 10 minutes) and drop the wheels and tires off at SM City Motorsports on my way to work and pick them up on my way home. $60

Either way, there is no wondering if the belt tension is right, if the alignment is right, if the forks are in a bind, if the pressures are correct, if things are greased, if the fasteners are properly torqued... because I make damned sure everything is perfect.
 

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I don't fiddle with adjusting the belt, just support the rear wheel and knock out the rear axel. The front is a snap. I buy my tires, carry in my wheels and, in about 90 minutes, take them home. My local shop charges me $35 per wheel.

Ride safe.


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Wow, that sounds like a great deal! Is it really as simple to knock out the axle as it sounds? I need new tires next Spring, and I would love to do it myself, if I thought it was something I could handle. I know supporting the bike & rear tire I could do no problem.

Thanks for any info you can give.
 

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My brother's shop only charges the price of the tire; front or rear. He sells the tires at retail. He won't do tires you bring in because of liabilities.

I've done my rear at his shop in Springfield. The hardest part was getting the caliper back on the disk and in the notch.
 

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Is it really as simple to knock out the axle as it sounds? I need new tires next Spring, and I would love to do it myself, if I thought it was something I could handle. I know supporting the bike & rear tire I could do no problem.
From the questions you are asking, maybe you should let the dealership do it. Not beating up on ya, but you don't want to experience your learning curve with tire swapping on your new $20,000 motorcycle.

You need a good bike jack, good tools, and basic knowledge/experience to tackle this job. The only thing between your ass and the asphalt... kinda important it be put together right.
 

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Wow, that sounds like a great deal! Is it really as simple to knock out the axle as it sounds? I need new tires next Spring, and I would love to do it myself, if I thought it was something I could handle. I know supporting the bike & rear tire I could do no problem.

Thanks for any info you can give.
IF you opt to do this yourself, my best advice is call on someone who has done it on their own to help and not tackle it by yourself the first time. half_crazy is right, you don't want a learning curve on this.

If you read the shop manual, tells you to drop the rear wheel by taking out the bolt on the shock. I wasn't comfortable with this so I remove the mufflers when I do mine. Other than that the only other hint I could offer you is before starting anything be sure you know a shop you are comfortable with that will mount your tires. Many shops will not mount unless you by from them. Check out Motorcycle Superstore for local shops that would likely do this for you.

Ride safe.
 

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C'mon it's a tire change. It's like pick one maintenance thing to do to a motorcycle that immerses you in the machine. Change a rear tire.
Grandpa or Grandma carried spare tube, a patch kit, a pump and spoons and they laid the bike over on its side and did the job wherever the need struck.
It ain't rocket scientry. There is not anything about a new motorcycle tire change that takes it out of the realm of doable by a shadetree wrench. More fiddly bits, but no earth shattering tech advancements beyond the abilities of someone with a memory of the six simple machines and the ability to put things back the way they came out. If anything, it's easier because shop tools have dwarfed what Grandpa had in his shed.
If you can't at least change a tire in your shed with a rudimentary understanding of mechanical systems, there's peeps in the park playing chess. Might be a more approachable pastime than rolling down the slab on a half ton of contraption that you have no inkling of the forces at work on. Just saying it's something to consider.
What I'm not saying is do everything yourself. Pop is no spring chicken either. I do enjoy time in the shop so it's different than hating wrenching. That doesn't mean that you should defer knowledge of an elementary maintenance item. Malcolm Forbes may not have felt the need to commune with his bikes through a set of Snap Ons but he kept two or three mechanics at his side when he rode. If you are in that fiscal stratosphere, lack of mechanical aptitude isn't a showstopper. Instead of carrying a tool roll he carried tool masters. I guess if you are rolling in ducats then using an AmEx to change a tire makes sense for you. Malcolm had an advantage though. He owned those mechanics. They got paid from one customer. Bear in mind that in many bike shops the tire changer is not even a guy with an AMI sheepskin. It's the summer help. Your 20k machines soft parts and alloy wheels are at the mercy of some snot nose with his Nellie playlist and nothing but hormones going on between his ears. You are rolling out benjamins for that "service". If you opt out of doing tires consider that before you bother feeding cash to a dealer. At least a small mom and pop indie may have some concern for the bike and their rep when they do skins.
A rider is doing themselves a favor getting down with their rubber parts at least once so they aren't clueless when faced with it down the road. Before Pop would even consider dropping four or five to a third party for skins I want to know, as opposed to assume, that it's the best decision for me.
 

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My dealer charges $50 if u buy the tire from them if u bring ur own it's $60-65 don't remember which my last tire change cost was around $200 and that was for a e3 tire
 

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C'mon it's a tire change. It's like pick one maintenance thing to do to a motorcycle that immerses you in the machine. Change a rear tire.
Grandpa or Grandma carried spare tube, a patch kit, a pump and spoons and they laid the bike over on its side and did the job wherever the need struck.
I recently had the joy of lifting a 600+ lb bike whose wheels had left terra firma. Took every pissed off drop of adrenaline I could wring out of those shriveled glands.

Well thought out designs like the Vision, with its fantastic tip over protection, make such maneuvers more manageable. I've seen vids of people changing tires on Gold Wings like that. Personally, I'll stick to tires that can be quickly and easily plugged on the road.

It ain't rocket scientry. There is not anything about a new motorcycle tire change that takes it out of the realm of doable by a shadetree wrench. More fiddly bits, but no earth shattering tech advancements beyond the abilities of someone with a memory of the six simple machines and the ability to put things back the way they came out. If anything, it's easier because shop tools have dwarfed what Grandpa had in his shed.
But Pops, Grandpa didn't have all that purdy chrome and paint to protect!

Your 20k machines soft parts and alloy wheels are at the mercy of some snot nose with his Nellie playlist and nothing but hormones going on between his ears.
Nellie? Me thinks it's been a few years since Pop was hangin with the homies. :D

A rider is doing themselves a favor getting down with their rubber parts at least once so they aren't clueless when faced with it down the road.
In addition, I think it's just good to have some idea of how things work before being faced with a roomful of hungry mechanics. But I would not recommend that someone with their first new wrench try changing a rear tires on one of these beasts on their own. One could easily spend $600 on jacks alone. If you're a 5k a year rider, that's 12 years worth of paying mechanics to do it for ya.
 

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My local shop, my tire, 165 included oil change, clean re-oil air filter, adjust belt and clutch cable, check all bolts on bike to make sure they were tight ($8 of it was also to sharpen my chain saw blade). My shop will only supply the E3 as they said Victory backs them up if something goes wrong so I bought a Avon Cobra from Jake Wilson and they put it on.
 

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Either way, there is no wondering if the belt tension is right, if the alignment is right, if the forks are in a bind, if the pressures are correct, if things are greased, if the fasteners are properly torqued... because I make damned sure everything is perfect.
That right there is why I do all my own work.
 

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I just dropped off my bike to my dealer...after 13,300 miles on the E3's it time for new tires. Dealer is a have a sale on the michelin commander II's so I am having both tires done....out the door 375.00 + tax. Asked all of the questions regarding rear tire size, radial versus bias plys. I am satisfied that these will work fine....would have gone back with the E3's but they have always seemed slick in the rain to me. As evident by the mileage on the stock tires.... I cruise a lot and am pretty O.C.D about tire pressure. I think I'm getting a pretty good deal.
 

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I had the rear tire changed first - drove bike in, had them do it $50. Then about 7 weeks later did the front $40. I buy the tires myself online - if this shop buys the tires for me he drops $10 off the cost of each wheel install/balance - but, $20 doesnt come close to the saving of shopping online for a good deal.
 

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C'mon it's a tire change. It's like pick one maintenance thing to do to a motorcycle that immerses you in the machine. Change a rear tire.
Grandpa or Grandma carried spare tube, a patch kit, a pump and spoons and they laid the bike over on its side and did the job wherever the need struck.
It ain't rocket scientry. There is not anything about a new motorcycle tire change that takes it out of the realm of doable by a shadetree wrench. More fiddly bits, but no earth shattering tech advancements beyond the abilities of someone with a memory of the six simple machines and the ability to put things back the way they came out. If anything, it's easier because shop tools have dwarfed what Grandpa had in his shed.
If you can't at least change a tire in your shed with a rudimentary understanding of mechanical systems, there's peeps in the park playing chess. Might be a more approachable pastime than rolling down the slab on a half ton of contraption that you have no inkling of the forces at work on. Just saying it's something to consider.
What I'm not saying is do everything yourself. Pop is no spring chicken either. I do enjoy time in the shop so it's different than hating wrenching. That doesn't mean that you should defer knowledge of an elementary maintenance item. Malcolm Forbes may not have felt the need to commune with his bikes through a set of Snap Ons but he kept two or three mechanics at his side when he rode. If you are in that fiscal stratosphere, lack of mechanical aptitude isn't a showstopper. Instead of carrying a tool roll he carried tool masters. I guess if you are rolling in ducats then using an AmEx to change a tire makes sense for you. Malcolm had an advantage though. He owned those mechanics. They got paid from one customer. Bear in mind that in many bike shops the tire changer is not even a guy with an AMI sheepskin. It's the summer help. Your 20k machines soft parts and alloy wheels are at the mercy of some snot nose with his Nellie playlist and nothing but hormones going on between his ears. You are rolling out benjamins for that "service". If you opt out of doing tires consider that before you bother feeding cash to a dealer. At least a small mom and pop indie may have some concern for the bike and their rep when they do skins.
A rider is doing themselves a favor getting down with their rubber parts at least once so they aren't clueless when faced with it down the road. Before Pop would even consider dropping four or five to a third party for skins I want to know, as opposed to assume, that it's the best decision for me.
You're a funny one, do you even know what I'm capable of...hell no.

I'm more than capable to change my own tires and I could have also done the cam job so take a chair and relax a little.

I'm a Certified Electrical - Mechanic that builds and maintains Substations and have been a journeyman mechanic for twelve years.

If I decided I wanted to do it, I would want to purchase the Witchdoctors skid plate, for stability, @ $299.00 and a jack for another $250.00 to $400.00 depending on the jack not to mention buying the tire.

I will eventually purchase these items and the will do my own maintenance NOT that it's any of your business.

I just layed down $2400.00 at the Vic Shop because my labor is worth more than what I had to pay and I didn't have a Dyno and I like supporting the little guy.

There, maybe next time you won't be in such a hurry to judge others but I doubt it since it seems to be your favorite past time putting forth negative comments.

Enjoy life gramps, it's too short! :ltr: wac
 
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