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Discussion Starter #1
My wife and I are interested in a number of hand guns. We recently complete the Florida CCW class which included about an hour of range time. Other than this, we have little experience with guns although we are strong believers in individual 2nd amendment rights. I would appreciate your opinions on the following.

We are looking to buy four guns:
1) Concealed carry gun for me - often to be worn in inside pocket of motorcycle vest when biking.
2) Concealed carry gun for my wife
3) Home protection gun
4) 22LR cal. in roughly same frame size as home protection gun for practice at lower cost for the ammo.

My opinion is that it would be simpler to get guns 1, 2, & 3 in the same caliber for ease of stocking ammo. From my limited research, 9 mm seemed the best compromise on caliber. The local gun shop told me that given our relative inexperience with guns, they recommended that all four guns should be from the same manufacturer and model line. This would give them all about the same operation, disassembly, cleaning, etc. so we would be more at ease with all of them. This seemed a wise idea. The gun shop sold many brands but recommended either the Ruger or the S&W brands. Within these, they recommended the following along with the prices they initially mentioned.

Ruger:
1) LC9 - my subsequent research suggests the LC9S would be better due to the much smoother and lighter trigger pull - $375
2) LC9, same as #1 but for my wife. She is a strong woman and will have no problem with the gun especially since the LC9s has the very low trigger pull.
3) SR9 - $475
4) SR22 - $390

Smith & Wesson
1) M&P Shield - Seemed too large for comfortable carry - $530
2) M&P shield, same as #1 but for my wife
3) SD9 - $350
4) M&P 22 - $400

I liked the feel of the LC9s much better as a carry weapon than the M&P Shield but did not actually get to test the trigger pull yet. I will plan to do that before actually buying should I choose that gun.

The Ruger's seemed a bit lower in cost than the S&W.

Anyway, that is what I learned in my investigation during today's visit to the gun shop, named "The Gun Shop" They also told me that they had a lifetime warranty on guns they sell (seems an incredible offer- too good to be true?) and include a year membership in their indoor range ($100 value). I would greatly appreciate your input.

Thanks and G'day,

Vinish
 

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I'm a S&W guy all the way . I like Ruger , actually named my Rotty that before I got my little guy Magnum . See a pattern here Vin ! :grin I feel like Ruger products are more " Clanky " and less refined then the Smith arms .... Although my Ruger Blackhawk .44 Magnum is a staple in my arsenal . If you want stopping power I also recommend .40 cal over 9mm , might just be me though . You really cant go wrong either way in the end .
 

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Does the Gun Shop have loaner pistols that you can shoot in their range? If not, find a shop that does and test as many as you can. Brand uniformity, to me, isn't as important as modularity. Glock has a wide array of frame sizes and calibers to choose from. And because they are so popular, many 3rd party companies have created parts that can be swapped in and out while performing flawlessly. With that said, ruger has stepped up its quality in the past decade tremendously, but still, I'd would test a lions share of guns before buying one.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, guys. Doobliss, what is "modularity"? The Gun Shop has some loaner guns to test fire. These include a couple of the ones on my lists above (Ruger LC9 and Ruger SR22). I do intend to test shoot some of these. Thanks.

G'day,

Vinish
 

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I have an LC9 and don't much like it. It is small and easy to carry though. I think it would be easier to hit a perpetrator at 25 yards by throwing the gun at him rather than shooting at them.
I also have a Springer XD40 that I love that is easy to shoot and very accurate. But it is too big to carry concealed for me.
 

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Thanks, guys. Doobliss, what is "modularity"? The Gun Shop has some loaner guns to test fire. These include a couple of the ones on my lists above (Ruger LC9 and Ruger SR22). I do intend to test shoot some of these. Thanks.

G'day,

Vinish
Modularity probably wasn't the best word. A description would be better: easy (and cheap) to modify or work on. 4 of my friends carry compact glocks that have a 70 dollar "drop in" trigger in them that makes shooting stupidly smooth and consistent. It's nice knowing you have options like that, instead of buying a different gun. Whatever you decide, practice makes perfect.:wink:grin
 

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For home protection itd be hard to go past a short barrel shotgun wouldnt it?
 

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My recommendation would be what ever you use to carry use for home defence that way you are very familiar with the firearm whenever you need to use it. Hopefully never. And Practice practice practice. Take as many classes as you can and most importantly know the laws in your area.

Springfield makes some very nice pistols that can be concealed easily with different magazine sizes.
 

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I agree with Doobliss, shoot as many guns as you can before you actually purchase one. That being said, both Ruger and S&W have stepped up their quality. As far as getting a .22 for practice, I'm a firm believer in "train as you fight" so I would recommend practice with what you are going to carry. The debate on what caliber to get is forever on-going and everyone has an opinion on what the best is. I say shoot what you can control and how quick you can get off follow up shots that still end up on target .40 cal is a nice round that is very easy to shoot. I carry a SIG P220 (.45) however it's a pain in the A** to carry concealed but I manage.

Thats my .02 cents worth

Dave
 

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If I may offer some advice from experience in this subject... The particular pistol you get for yourself and wife is irrelevant. What is much more important is that you get some professional training. Without it you might end up shooting each other or someone else you love.

Just getting the permit is scratching the surface of what you need to know and learn.

See if your local gun dealer can point you in the direction of some good professional training.

I wish it was as simple as learning how to ride a motorcycle which we all know isn't simple at all. We need to learn how to read traffic to stay alive. I guess in a way knowing how to ride safely and knowing how to own, use, and operate a gun safely isn't all that different.
 

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Here's my 2 cents. Our carry pieces and home defense pieces are the same. Hers is a Baretta 21A tilt barrel .22 LR semi auto. Mine is a Taurus PT-22 which is essentially the same thing only a bit beefier. I like the tilt barrel feature as that makes it easy to pop a round in it, slam in the magazine and its ready to fire. Easy peasy. We load em with Stinger rounds for more wallop.
Now there are those that talk about stopping power and the like, but if push comes to shove and its time to brandish, your aggressor is going to skedaddle quite rapidly. If he doesn't, there are many folks pushing up daisies that have been done in by .22s.
I like sticking with .22s cuz that's what our target pistols are for shooting at the club. Also, those two guns I mentioned are about as small a pistol can get and still have an adult size grip.
I also have a 9mm carry piece, but it really annoys me to carry it as it is so heavy. Chances are, I'll never need to use a gun, so why schlep a ship anchor around when a .22 slides nicely into a pocket.
21 A Bobcat
MODEL 22 .22 LR PISTOL WITH CHECKERED WOOD GRIPS
Both of our's have nicely polished wood grips with thumb rests. What ever you get, don't get a .25 cal--they are about as effective as BB guns. No stopping or penetrating power.
 

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If it ever came to you having to use the gun against somebody, trigger pull will probably be the last thing on your mind. I personally think a longer heavier pull is the way to go for a defensive gun. There's less chance of an accidental discharge that way. The lc9 is that way and a lot of people complained about it. I haven't practiced with mine too much, but I can shoot good enough with it. After you fire enough, you'll get use to it. The lc9 can also fit in my front pocket
 

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Start by holding and functioning (i.e. pull the slide back) on the guns you're interested in plus several others. You'll find that some are going to be more comfortable than others and some will be easier to function than others.

Once you've picked the candidates go into the range and shoot all of them. You'll find that some are easier to get on target with while others are all over the place.

After you've done all that you shouldbe able to make an accurate assessment of what works for you.


Heres a few other things to note:
Small 380's are cheap, snappy and impossible to keep a good group with. A larger 380 will eliminate most of that but ammo is more difficult to find and more expensive the 9mm or 40.

9mm is the same caliber as 380 (same projectile too) but has almost twice the powder. Most 9mm pistols will pull up a bit when you fire but tend to drop right back on target (mid sized/large framed pistols are more consistent at this than small framed pistols).

40mm pistols come in pretty much the same sizes as 9mm pistols. 40mm has slightly more kick than 9mm and the ammo costs about 50% more than 9mm but often less than 380.

45 ACP can be found in mid/full sized pistols - compact pistols are available however compact 45 pistols tend to be fairy beefy in comparison to a 9mm pistol. 45 shoots well as it tends to have more push than muzzle jump. 45 is about the same price as 40.

Price trends were discussed because you're probably going to want to put 200-300 rounds through a pistol to break it in and after you're comfortable with it you may want to shoot another 50-100 rounds per month just to maintain proficiency.
 

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4 of my friends carry compact glocks that have a 70 dollar "drop in" trigger in them that makes shooting stupidly smooth and consistent.
If they would ever have to use them guns in a defensive situation, anything changed internally that makes the gun perform differently, could be used against them in court.
 

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If they would ever have to use them guns in a defensive situation, anything changed internally that makes the gun perform differently, could be used against them in court.
Seriously? How so?
 

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I carry a Springfield Armory 45acp XDS. Fits nicely just about anywhere. My wife has the M&P 9. I thought I wanted a Glock until I held one, to damn fat for my hand. My wife says i have small "Carnie" hands. I think that's an insult to carnival folk myself! I also have a Berretta ARX160 22lr and a RGuns 556 AR ( my Xmas gift from myself). That's what I'll pull out if the damn Shiites come knocking on my door!
 

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You are getting a lot of good advice here.
Something you haven't read is this....
Google
Breached lock vs. Blow back pistols

Straight blow back pistols very much tend to be "harsher" to shoot. Breached lock will be easier firing.
Trigger pull , caliber, physical size etc are all things to consider.
SO is the thing I mentioned. If you can shoot some before purchase you will see a difference. BUT you may not truly care either. If you only carry once in a while and don't shoot very often....
Although as a firearms instructor, I say take a good course and shoot often. Get familiar with whatever you choose.
GOOD LUCK and be safe.
 

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personally i am a big fan of Glock (my concealed carry of choice being a 23c), beretta, and Ruger. never had a single problem with any of them...

that being said, if you are looking for modularity, look at a 1911 with the .22 conversion.I have a para-ordinance 1911 normally chambered in .45, but on my wish list is a .22 conversion for it. includes a new barrel and magazine for the .22 othewise the frame and slide are still the factory items. changes out in 15 minutes...

but like has already been stated, you can't go wrong with a wheel-gun. there are tons of hammerless pistols designed specifically for close quarters and nothing to snag on a purse or jacket or shirt or anything like that.. only limit is ammo but honestly, if you really need more than 6 rounds to get yourself out of a sticky situation, you might want to spend more time at the range and in defensive pistol courses...
just my $0.02...
 

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https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=dirty+harry+44magnum&view=detail&mid=3004230514AC5260AEB13004230514AC5260AEB1&FORM=VIRE1

really doesn't matter what you get.
as long as you have the balls to use it
I've found it hard to put down a couple of pets.
but we aren't talking about pets
but if you freeze you will loose ,as you are the good guy
and he is bad apparently
if you don't you may as well save your coin

but here in aus it would take 15 minutes to find the keys
and unlock everything .and then you would go to jail for
for even thinking about protecting yourself

but if I was in your situation i'd get the biggest and badest
 
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