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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last weekend i was on a 5 day trip to the Hill Country of Texas riding with friends for approximately 1000 miles total. I have a new battery and a NAPA main breaker was installed several years ago. Thankfully Wednesday through Saturday I had no issues whatsoever, we were in the middle of nowhere most of the time. Sunday morning I awoke to a 35 degree morning and headed home. I had no issues until about 180 miles later when I was cruising along at 70ish MPH when I looked down and saw that my battery light was on and my voltage was around 12. The road I was on had no shoulder at all, and I figured that maybe I had a loose battery cable as I have experienced this before. I knew I was about 5 miles from a rest stop/picnic area and pushed on. A few minutes later as I am riding I notice the voltage between 8-10 and dropping and now the Check engine light is on. I only had 2 miles to go to the safe stopping area so I continued. I see the voltage is dropping rapidly as I get to the turn off for the rest area, so I pulled in the clutch and revved the engine, When I did that the voltage went back up to 14 and the check engine light went out but the battery light stayed on. I made it safely to the rest area and removed the chin fairing and checked the battery cables, they were tight! But now I dont have enough voltage to start the bike. My wife ended up bringing a trailer and I eventually made it home albeit 4 hours later than expected. So my dilemma is: do you guys think its the regulator/rectifier or a stator issue? The regulator appears fine and is not burnt or damaged. I have about 18k miles on the 2014 XCT.
 

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As a complete guess I'd say the regulator just due to the odds of which one will fail. But don't guess. First check that all the connections are clean and solid. And don't be spending money on either until you know for sure which one is not performing properly.

To confirm the problem source, you really need to do some proper testing of both. Meters are cheap if you don't have one. (You should) Rather than go into it here, take a look on the internet for the testing procedure and results you should expect. There's some very good information and video examples and it's really fairly easy. Read/watch them a few times until you fully understand the reasons for each and their outputs. You already know the regulator output is low so start with the stator.

And in case they don't mention it; fully charge up the battery with a proper charger. Preferably overnight. If you or a friend doesn't have one you might find a local auto store that's willing to do it for you. (don't let them just test it nor do I believe using one of the regular tenders is good enough) You can't get proper test results without a 100% battery.

You'll do fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As a complete guess I'd say the regulator just due to the odds of which one will fail. Check that all the connections are solid first. And don't be spending money on either until you know for sure which one is not performing properly. To confirm the problem source, you really need to do some proper testing of both. Rather than go into it here, take a look on the internet for the testing procedure and results you should expect. There's some very good information and video examples and it's really fairly easy. Read/watch them a few times until you fully understand the reasons for each and their outputs. You already know the regulator output is low so start with the stator.

And in case they don't mention it; fully charge up the battery with a proper charger. Using one of the regular tenders is not good enough. You can't get proper test results without a 100% battery.
Thank you for the input. I am confident the battery is good, using a NOCO genius 10. Having watched videos while I was waiting for my wife to arrive with the truck and trailer I saw that testing the Stator is a pretty easy process, but apparently the Polaris Regulators are a pain due to some internal differences. I also am curious if some reg/rectifiers fail when the reach a certain temperature...even though I was riding in cool/cold air I had been at 70ish MPH for a few hours.
 

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All electronics will fail at extreme high temperatures or loads. When designed, their use is taken into account when developing the specs for each component and electronics is one of the areas where 'you get what you pay for'. They all have their own limits and as they age those limits get reduced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
All electronics will fail at extreme high temperatures or loads. When designed, their use is taken into account when developing the specs for each component and electronics is one of the areas where 'you get what you pay for'. They all have their own limits and as they age those limits get reduced.
Now that you mention it, i forgot to add that for the majority of the ride I had the seat and grip heaters on.
 

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The service manual has procedures for testing the various parts of the electrical system which concern you. Follow these. I had the rectifier/regulator on a 2012 XCT fail on me in ~2016. They can go bad. Fortunately, I had another 2012 XCT so I could swap the R/R and determine definitively that the R/R was the problem.
 

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My girlfriend Vegas had the same problem bout the voltage dropping and it was the voltage regulator
 

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Mine didnt do the drop down voltage. It actually got up to 14V and eng lite came on and lucky for me I was only a couple blocks from home. But the replacement I got went T.U. and I had to get a replacement. Do the test and it will lead you in the right direction. But my suspicion is RR
 

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As a complete guess I'd say the regulator just due to the odds of which one will fail. But don't guess. First check that all the connections are clean and solid. And don't be spending money on either until you know for sure which one is not performing properly.

To confirm the problem source, you really need to do some proper testing of both. Meters are cheap if you don't have one. (You should) Rather than go into it here, take a look on the internet for the testing procedure and results you should expect. There's some very good information and video examples and it's really fairly easy. Read/watch them a few times until you fully understand the reasons for each and their outputs. You already know the regulator output is low so start with the stator.

And in case they don't mention it; fully charge up the battery with a proper charger. Preferably overnight. If you or a friend doesn't have one you might find a local auto store that's willing to do it for you. (don't let them just test it nor do I believe using one of the regular tenders is good enough) You can't get proper test results without a 100% battery.

You'll do fine.
Good advice!!
 
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