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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I am 43 and going to get my motorcycle license in April. I have ridden 4 wheelers for many years. I understand it isn't even close to the same thing but I am looking for advice about the Victory Vegas...can you guys tell me if that is too much bike for my first?
 

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Most people will tell you its too much bike for you. Do you know how to drive a manual? That's the first basic thing you need to know.
 

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Before you buy take a BRC (Basic Riders Course). I would say this to anyone regardless of gender. It serves two basic things...it teaches you HOW to BASICALLY ride (only experience will improve your rider skills)...and it will give you a discount on MOST insurances.

Taking a BRC or even an advance riders course is nothing to be ashamed of either. I take a medium level riders course EVERY YEAR!! I would even take the BSR if my group offered it for free every time (I sponsor the medium level and it is free for members of my website).

Again...I highly recommend you find one ASAP...take it more than once if that would make you feel more comfortable. After you get your Vegas (which I don't think would be too much bike for you)...find a school or church parking lot and do LOTS and LOTS of emergency stops, figure 8's and slow turns.

Just a short story...One of the guys that I used to ride with a few years ago took the BRC the first time we offered it and he had rode motorcycles for over 30 years. He was an EXCELLENT rider too...he's the guy I want a trip with me when we would do 10 day rides. During the BRC....he dropped his bike. He was a helluva rider, but he had not practiced the skills of slow turns or the fundamentals that beginners learn and for a short while he struggled with it. He told me after the course, it opened his eyes and he realized he wasn't quite the invincible rider he thought he was...

Take the BRC.
 

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My 17 yr old daughter rides a 05 Victory Vegas so the bikes definitely not to big as far as seat height unless your real short. The bike has quite a bit of power but that's a good thing.
I would still consider a smaller cc bike to learn on for a few months. That's what I did with my daughter, we bought a 1990 Virago 250 for like $800. bucks rode for a few months then sold it for $800 and bought he a bigger bike.

Heres the 250 Virago she learned on.


Here's her Vegas
 

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Before even taking a basic riders course.. Be proficient on a bicycle.. You need a good sense of balance to operate any bike.. But starting out on a bike this heavy with no experience?? With this much power? ..It can be done, though the learning curve for safely operating a bike of this size is substantial..

But it can be done..

Most would start off on a smaller bike - if you don't want to start off on a smaller bike, yes, definitely take an MSF course, they'll usually supply a lighter bike to take the course on. Taking a basic rider course - you'll get a good feel for riding a bike.. But for as much help as getting on a 250 and learning some basic skills in how to control it is gonna help - it isn't gonna be the same as riding a much bigger, heavier bike..

They say, the fastest way to safely learn to ride a bike is to start off small, then move up the ladder.. The learning curve isn't half as steep that way..

People do start out on these heavier, more powerful bikes.. Happens all the time.. But be prepared to put in some serious work - parking lot practice etc. - into learning how to safely handle your bike.

Whatever you decide.. Don't give-up and All the Best.. Because once you have this thing down.. Riding a bike.. It's like flying.. And that's a feeling like nothing else.. thumb up .. cheers
 

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Can you do it? Well that depends on what is between your ears. Some can some can't, and it has no real reflection on how you'll end up later on.
A MC is heavy, and no mater who you are if it gets overbalanced it will go down. So weight is pretty irrelevant. Invest in good engine guards and when the day comes, let them do their job, don't hurt yourself.
Take the things you learned over the years, and put hem to use. If you haven't learned to read traffic and know that people look "through" you and not "at" you, then you haven't been paying attention. Some of the actions you take in an event will change from the proper reaction in a car, so keep that in mind. Along with good habits, it will get you started. Don't pay attention to a lot of the old wisdom that abound in the MC world, most weren't that good before they got old. LOL
Take the BRC, find someone to help learning to ride, and preferably not a SO, you'll argue too much, and spend some time learning the bike, make it a second nature for the controls, how they work, and making them work to your advantage. I hear that parking lot skills are worthless on the street all the time, and would challenge anyone who truly believes that to try them out. It is basic function and without it, you have nothing to build on.

You are the only one who can decide. Have fun and welcome to the Mayhem.
 

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The clutch is going to be to hard for you to pull and to much of a stretch for your hand.
Go buy a Honda or a Harley. That's the truth
 

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The clutch is going to be to hard for you to pull and to much of a stretch for your hand.
Go buy a Honda or a Harley. That's the truth
The clutch leaver becomes much easier to pull once the cable breaks.
 

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... I hear that parking lot skills are worthless on the street all the time, and would challenge anyone who truly believes that to try them out. It is basic function and without it, you have nothing to build on...
Yup, all of the time.. But a person new to this could get a good feel for bike balance at low speeds, in a parking lot.. In traffic, low speed balance is pretty-much essential. If you have that down before getting into too much traffic, then that would help.

Slow speed maneuvers, tight, low speed cornering while moving or from a standstill, getting a feel for low speed gear selection and clutch use, are, those skills used at any intersection..

Even learning how to park a bike is good to practice..

Getting used to brakes and stopping distances, stopping and starting with one foot on the ground - the other on a brake - because we all know what happens braking using just a front brake with poor traction, and you will find bad traction at many intersections where you will need to come to a stop..

Practicing swerving and emergency braking..

For me, somebody who was once new at all this - and even now, as somebody with experience - learning different skills to handle the heft of a bike out of traffic is a help in developing different skills.

Yup! ..Call me a noooob, but the first thing I did after I rode my XCT from Phoenix to Payson (80 miles of bumper to bumper traffic, highway speeds and mountain twisties.. I went to an abandoned parking lot and got a real feel for the heft of my new bike doing some slow speed radical maneuvering and balancing stuff, then took it up to 50 and hit the brakes.. :D .

For me, it's always nice to have a feel for a new machine, get a feel for any new quirks and for what I am up against before hitting downtown traffic. thumb up

The rest.. like you say.. It's reading the traffic, developing instinct, taking nothing for granted and not riding too far past your current skill-set which develops naturally over time..

All That ^^^ ...For me anyway? A parking lot has been a great help.. :D .. cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you

Thank you everyone for your input..I didn't mention that I am going to taket the safety course in April...so yes I will be taking the 2 day course. I also think after all the great input I will start off a little smaller with maybe a honda...and move up when I get better and more practice. My boyfriend has a Victory Cross Country and he loves it...he just wanted to get input on the vegas because that is the one I liked. Great advice everyone...thank you again!thumb up
 

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Yeah I can't bring myself to totally buy into the notion that a Victory (which is basically a v-twin compact car engine) is a GREAT bike for beginners.

But on the other hand- buying a small bike, and then trying to get rid of it a year later can be costly, so... Guess there's something to be said for learning on the bike you want to ride for a long time.

Just take it easy, and NEVER NEVER underestimate the stupidity of the cagers around you for second. Yes that's vague- but there's no other simple way to say it..
 

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Yeah I can't bring myself to totally buy into the notion that a Victory (which is basically a v-twin compact car engine) is a GREAT bike for beginners.

But on the other hand- buying a small bike, and then trying to get rid of it a year later can be costly, so... Guess there's something to be said for learning on the bike you want to ride for a long time.
Yeah.. ^^ +1 on that... Don't buy a 250.. Unless you are 4 feet tall.. In that case DO buy a 250 :D

But me, personally.. Talking cruisers here.. I wouldn't start on anything less than a 600 - a 750 would be even better - as you can grow into one of those over a good, long, period of time, instead of growing out of a 250 over a period of weeks.. thumb up
 

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Thank you everyone for your input..I didn't mention that I am going to taket the safety course in April...so yes I will be taking the 2 day course. I also think after all the great input I will start off a little smaller with maybe a honda...and move up when I get better and more practice. My boyfriend has a Victory Cross Country and he loves it...he just wanted to get input on the vegas because that is the one I liked. Great advice everyone...thank you again!thumb up
Maybe look at the Indian Scout? It's a lot smaller and lighter.
 

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I don't like riding in rain but was caught in it yesterday. I stopped at a light going downhill and didn't realize I was on a paint strip until front tire slid slightly and I almost went down. I always use both brakes but had enough force on front to cause this surprise.

At 240 lbs., I manhandled it but it hurt my left arm. A lady on a vegas would most likely have laid it down.

Everyone starting out should start small and work their way up. My 2 cents...
 
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