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Hi gang:
I recently purchased a 2010 Cross Country and am itching for riding season to start up here in the frozen north. It has the detachable tour trunk ande I'm adding a few necessities - the heel shifter kit and highway pegs, the ones that bolt on under the floor boards. I added the dipstick thermometer more out of curiousity than necessity, I've heard they're not that accurate; but it's been a while since I had an air-cooled bike and feel the peek inside the engine is worth the investment. I think my next purchase will be the protection rails for the hard bags. Any opinions or other must-haves I should look at?

Also I am thinking of hitting the Victory rally in Spirit Lake, Iowa, in August. Worth the trip?

Sorry about so many questions; thought this might be a good place to find answers.

DrifterDon
 

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My insurance agent told me if I go north I have to have a special insurance for Canada and apply for a special temp drivers license. Let alone a PASS PORT. So you know what. Does not look like I am going north.wac
 

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My insurance agent told me if I go north I have to have a special insurance for Canada and apply for a special temp drivers license. Let alone a PASS PORT. So you know what. Does not look like I am going north.wac
Your insurance agent is high.

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1082.html

"Driving in Canada is similar to driving in many parts of the United States. Distances and speeds, however, are posted in kilometers per hour and some signs, particularly in Quebec, may only be in French. U.S. driver’s licenses are valid in Canada. Proof of auto insurance is required. U.S. auto insurance is accepted as long as an individual is a tourist in Canada. U.S. insurance firms will issue a Canadian insurance card, which should be obtained and carried prior to driving into Canada. For specific information concerning Canadian driving permits, mandatory insurance and entry regulations, please contact the Canadian National Tourist Organization."

Finally, you'll need a passport to go anywhere these days thanks to our womanized gov't that must protect us from every possible hangnail.

Now as to whether or not it's worth your trouble, here's a little taste of what you're missing:

 
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