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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I didn't like the sound of the stock exhaust so I cut, hacked and drilled on my stock baffles. I couldn't get the sound I wanted and I wasn't worried about destroying my stock baffles because my fall back plan was to order some Monster Thunder Baffles from bigcitythunder.com Well, I gave them a call with the specs of my X-Bow exhaust in hand. Pipe I.D. 2-5/8" and baffle O.D. 2.6" (just a hair under the pipe I.D.) Turns out they don't make baffles that large for the X-Bow exhaust.

I talked to a forum member about making a set similar to the Monster Thunder original series but then decided to try it myself. I ordered a section of 2" O.D. aluminized steel exhaust pipe, four 2.5" O.D. to 2" I.D. aluminized steel exhaust reducers, a couple 3/4" O.D. steel washers and a couple 1/4" - 20 steel hex head bolts from summit racing.

1parts.jpg

I measured and marked the reducer 1.5" up from the step down, then wrapped duct tape around the reducer at my mark so I get a straight line all the way around the reducer and marked the edge with a black sharpie.

2tapereducer.jpg

I used a .040 cut off wheel and cut just outside my mark leaving just a little bit on the outside.

3cutreducer.jpg

I used a grinding wheel to grind the metal down to the black line. I did it this way just so I don't accidently cut too much on the inside of my line.

4grindreducer.jpg

I used a gasket remover attachment on my angle grinder to get all the sharp burs off. Not trying to get it perfect, just enough so I don't cut myself handling the baffles.

5deburreducer.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
I measured a 6” section of the 2” O.D. pipe and marked it then I used the duct tape to go around the pipe to mark and obtain my straight line.

6tapepipe.jpg

I used the .040” cut off wheel to cut the section of pipe.

7cutpipe.jpg

I slid the small end of each reducer over the pipe so that the edge of the pipe stops right before the reducer enlarges. I tack welded each reducer just enough to hold the pipe incase I need to grind off the tack weld and adjust.

8tacbaffle.jpg

After the baffle got tack welded, I test fit it to my pipe. It slid in so I’m ready to proceed.

9testfit.jpg

I put a steel wire wheel on my grinder and removed the aluminized coating around the end of the reducers where I’ll be making my welds and also removed the stickers.

10buffcoating.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
One baffle just tacked and the other ready for more welding.

11grindbaffle.jpg

Here is the inside of the baffle, you can see the reduction will provide just a little back pressure but still an open pipe.

12inside baffle.jpg

Both baffles have been tacked I’m ready to drill my hole for mounting.

13bafflesbuffedandtacked.jpg

I used a very small drill bit to get a pilot hole before drilling with a ¼” bit.

14drillpilot.jpg

I used a ¼” drill bit to get my final mounting holes on the baffles, I wallerd the bit around so it’s not such a tight fit getting my ¼” bolt to slide in. I also ran a bead around the entire reducer on the inside (closest end to the engine) just to prevent any possible whistling. It’s not pretty, I’m not a welder. Because of that I’m almost not sorry about the blurry pic. :D

15qtrinchhole.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I used the same cut off wheel I been using to cut my material to cut a notch on the end of the ¼” bolt that I ordered. I’m going to use this to make a lollipop.

16slotbolt.jpg

With the washer sitting inside the slot I cut into the bolt, I welded the washer to the bolt. Watch your heat, I burned through the washer pretty easy.

17weldwasher.jpg

With the washer welded to the bolt, I used my cut off wheel to cut the hex head off the bolt.

18lolipopcutheadoff.jpg

I used needle nose vice grips to hold the lollipop in the baffle while I welded the bolt to the inside of the baffle. I placed it right on the edge of the 2” pipe inside.

19weldlolipop.jpg

That’s it, time to mount the baffles inside the exhaust and see what it sounds like.

Again, I'm not a welder or a metal fabricator so these may not be the prettiest baffles around but they'll be hidden inside my exhaust anyway. If I get the sound I was after then I'm a happy biker. thumb up

(next up...a video of the start up)
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
And here it is, took me 3 hours which is probably longer than it should take.

I must say, I'm a happy biker. This is the sound I was after. You can definitely hear it at an idle, sounds like some muscle when you rev it. I took it for a short ride and it has that nice deep rumble I was looking for.



 

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Discussion Starter #7

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... and a good write up.
 

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Sounds just right! Nice job!
 

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I must say, I'm a happy biker.
Wow Rebel, very impressive. While it doesn't have the potato potato thing it definitely has that American muscle sound. First time I ever recall hearing such a voicing come from behind a Victory. And who ever guessed that all it took was dangling a washer at the output? :crzy:

Now for the important part. How does the bike run when it's not idling?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks fellas! As far as how it runs. So far so good. I rode it into work this morning which is only 9 miles so not a large sample to take from but thus far, no popping or backfiring on decel. I do not notice any change in the "seat of the pants" feel from stock. When I modified the stock baffles I think I lost some mid range power. 9 miles is not really enough to know for sure but I think I have that mid range back. Looking forward to a longer ride... cheers
 

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Nice! Good Job!
 

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Rebel Biker

Haven't seen a snuffer nut in a 100 years. They had a spring on nut end so you could go from baffled to straight threw.
Don't know if you ever hear of BUB they make exhaust and at one time he sold pipes that had a 5/16" bolt in the pipes and when you changed how far in it went it would change the sound.
Hats off to all your work and great photos
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Rebel Biker

Haven't seen a snuffer nut in a 100 years. They had a spring on nut end so you could go from baffled to straight threw.
Don't know if you ever hear of BUB they make exhaust and at one time he sold pipes that had a 5/16" bolt in the pipes and when you changed how far in it went it would change the sound.
Hats off to all your work and great photos
Yep, I've only read about those and I did contemplate making mine that way...or at least adjustable by using a locking nut that I could loosen and twist the bolt to obtain different angles. But I also read that most seemed happier with the washer at a 90deg angle to the exhaust so I figured I'd just weld it in that position.

Thanks, I appreciate the compliment
 

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Sounds great, great write up.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I took the interstate home so I can see what she has at the upper end and what my acceleration would be at 70 or 80. Again, I don't notice much difference by the seat of the pants feel now than before I messed with the stock X-bow baffles but definitely better than what I had after cutting up the stock baffles.

Now coming from a stop at an intersection and getting her to about 10 mph in 1st gear and just holding it there for a second, I quickly rolled the throttle and my rear tire spun, I had to let off and grab another gear. Its spun before but usually just on wet pavement :D I think I found a little more lower end torque than what I've had prior. I'll have to try it a couple more times to be sure. thumb up
 
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