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Hi all, I asked this question a different way a while back and didn't really get any answers.

This is the first "high" compression bike I have owned. I come most recently from a Honda VTX. My XC seems to turn over slow as compared to the VTX, this past winter she was really slow. Also sometimes I will hit the start button and it will start to turn over then stop, like it comes up against the compression and doesn't have the umph to push it on over. Frequently it takes 2 pushes of the start button before she fires, occasionally 3:confused:

I am wondering if this is normal on the XC or maybe I have a weak battery. I have checked the battery terminals and they are tight (with a wrench). According to the volt meter the bike has over 14 volts while running and just over 13 volts if the engine is off. I know I can pull the battery and take it to be load tested, just don't want to go thru the hassle if this is normal condition on the XC.
 

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I have the 2012 XC and it starts just about as quick as you hit the button. I came from a Suzuki C-90 and it had a cable that released the compression when you hit the start button. If it was out of adjustment it would just give a grunt and that was it. Not sure how the Vic works.
 

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Well, I came from a Harley Electra Glide Classic, and it was about the same, before that was a C50 Suzuki and well you know the Japanese bikes fast as **** when cranking.

I prefer the "labored" turnover it just sounds like POWER!! thumb up
 

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Your battery sounds weak. Mine always turned over instantly, and always on the first try. Never a hesitation.

Have never seen a Vic that didn't start like that either. From a Harley I would expect this, from a Vic... no way.
 

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Less than a month ago I was riding a VTX as well. VTX's do have decompressors for starting, and as far as I know Victorys don't have that even with their higher compression.

However, my (new) XCT starts about the same as the VTX, so my advice would be to go ahead and pull the battery and have it tested. If it tests good you can go look at other things like the cable connections on the other end or perhaps an issue with the starter or charging system.

Testing with a voltmeter is fine, however if a cable or battery or connection has a problem resulting in high resistance you usually won't see a voltage problem but a current problem...i.e. the battery won't be able to push enough current to spin the starter motor (and engine) quickly.
 

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Battery connections have been suspect from some dealers (not tightening them down FULLY) and it does sound like your not getting a full "charge" available to crack the bike so you may want to simply tighten the connections at the battery yourself. if that doesn't do it, take it to your dealer. try out the other bikes on the floor for comparison
 

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Hold the throttle open about 1/16 turn and hit the starter, it should start right up.
 

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Hold the throttle open about 1/16 turn and hit the starter, it should start right up.
WHY? No need to turn the throttle AT ALL on these bikes to start them....ever. At least not on mine w/6K miles on it.wac
 

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WHY? No need to turn the throttle AT ALL on these bikes to start them....ever. At least not on mine w/6K miles on it.wac
I disagree and i think we should all take some advice from one of the most renowned victory wrenches in the world:

http://www.lloydz.com/techtips.asp

"This is a simple procedure that everyone does but I'm going to shed some light on the method I prefer in starting a Victory the way I do.

This applies to all years and all model Victory's. Throughout the course of a year while I was on the road traveling I would tune between 300-450 Victory's a year, add in the shop work and that would add another 100 to the total. So it’s a fairly simple procedure, You hit the button and wait for it to come to life. With starting so many different bikes they do have their own characteristics but they all respond well to this procedure. Before hitting the button I roll the throttle slightly (about an 1/8 rotation) than I hit the button, once to life I like to hold the rpm's between 15-1800 Rpm's for approx 30-40 seconds if the bike is real cold (50 degrees and below) and 15-30 seconds if were above those temps.

Here’s some benefits of starting a bike the way I like too. When a bike is cold so is everything else. Oil is super thick and the oil pump is loaded heavy trying to push the oil through the small clearances to lubricate everything. When the motor first fires up it is straining just to maintain an idle, the computer is throwing allot of fuel (choke Mode) to the injectors to aide in the ease of running cold. This also wants to make things lumber and run slightly slower in engine speed. By using an 1/8 throttle rotation we help the engine overcome these conditions and supply oil to the critical parts quicker. We all know that a warm motor starts easier than a cold one as there is less drag and frictional losses to keep it running with less effort. Yes the bikes are fuel injected and some people assume there might be damage or that its just not correct to use throttle while starting a fuel injected bike. B.S. that’s not the case, not in these years but maybe the future of fuel injection may lead to different results as fly by wire becomes more common and wide band monitoring enters the motorcycle world.

Give it a shot your motor just might thank you.

LG"
 

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I disagree and i think we should all take some advice from one of the most renowned victory wrenches in the world:

http://www.lloydz.com/techtips.asp
Sorry, I may have missed a point. Is Ammo_umb actually Lloyds? I am not saying that you CAN'T do it that way. I am just saying that it hasn't been needed on ANY of the 20-odd late-model Victory bikes I have ridden. The OPs issues seem to be deeper than a simply throttle "blip" but perhaps they are not that unusual to others with more experience.
 

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I disagree and i think we should all take some advice from one of the most renowned victory wrenches in the world:

http://www.lloydz.com/techtips.asp

"This is a simple procedure that everyone does but I'm going to shed some light on the method I prefer in starting a Victory the way I do.

This applies to all years and all model Victory's. Throughout the course of a year while I was on the road traveling I would tune between 300-450 Victory's a year, add in the shop work and that would add another 100 to the total. So it’s a fairly simple procedure, You hit the button and wait for it to come to life. With starting so many different bikes they do have their own characteristics but they all respond well to this procedure. Before hitting the button I roll the throttle slightly (about an 1/8 rotation) than I hit the button, once to life I like to hold the rpm's between 15-1800 Rpm's for approx 30-40 seconds if the bike is real cold (50 degrees and below) and 15-30 seconds if were above those temps.

Here’s some benefits of starting a bike the way I like too. When a bike is cold so is everything else. Oil is super thick and the oil pump is loaded heavy trying to push the oil through the small clearances to lubricate everything. When the motor first fires up it is straining just to maintain an idle, the computer is throwing allot of fuel (choke Mode) to the injectors to aide in the ease of running cold. This also wants to make things lumber and run slightly slower in engine speed. By using an 1/8 throttle rotation we help the engine overcome these conditions and supply oil to the critical parts quicker. We all know that a warm motor starts easier than a cold one as there is less drag and frictional losses to keep it running with less effort. Yes the bikes are fuel injected and some people assume there might be damage or that its just not correct to use throttle while starting a fuel injected bike. B.S. that’s not the case, not in these years but maybe the future of fuel injection may lead to different results as fly by wire becomes more common and wide band monitoring enters the motorcycle world.

Give it a shot your motor just might thank you.

LG"


A fuel injected motor doesn't benefit from rolling the throttle to start the bike, this idea laid about above is to help the motor get a little more fuel once started (immediately) to maintain a higher rpm level to get things going better. That I understand, and it sounds fine.

But the OP is asking about actual initial startup. If we had carburetors, then rolling the throttle open a bit would help by getting the fuel going as you hit the starter, but in a fuel injected motor, nothing will happen until the bike starts up.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for all the replies, it is sounding like I need to pull the battery and take it to be load tested.

Hold the throttle open about 1/16 turn and hit the starter, it should start right up.
I have tried these procedures, it does not help.

Also I have tightened the battery terminals with a wrench, that solved my stereo cutting out on occasion but nothing with the slow cranking.

We went for a nice ride today, about 180 miles total, charging system still shows good (on the dash meter) but after our lunch stop, she did the not enough power to get past the compression thing first try. Pushed the button again and she turned over and finally started.

I am a little surprised that a 2011 model would have a bad battery, but then again I have bought more than one new battery to find out it was bad from the factory.:crzy:

Supposed to be chitty weather tomorrow, so I think I will pull the battery and run it up to the local Batteries Plus to be checked out. I get a nice discount from them if I need to get a replacement.cheers
 

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Bunka I'm not even close to being Lloyds! I just remember what was brought up in the past with a slow starting thread and a starter clutch thread.

I ride year round and don't have to use the throttle when it's over 40 but between 15 and 40 a little trottle definately wakes the bike up quicker! The good part about riding through the winter is that I have zero need for a battery tender and my battery is still as good as new with nearly 17000 miles on it.
 

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Hi all, I asked this question a different way a while back and didn't really get any answers.

This is the first "high" compression bike I have owned. I come most recently from a Honda VTX. My XC seems to turn over slow as compared to the VTX, this past winter she was really slow. Also sometimes I will hit the start button and it will start to turn over then stop, like it comes up against the compression and doesn't have the umph to push it on over. Frequently it takes 2 pushes of the start button before she fires, occasionally 3:confused:

I am wondering if this is normal on the XC or maybe I have a weak battery. I have checked the battery terminals and they are tight (with a wrench). According to the volt meter the bike has over 14 volts while running and just over 13 volts if the engine is off. I know I can pull the battery and take it to be load tested, just don't want to go thru the hassle if this is normal condition on the XC.

Lloydz say open the throttle about a 1/8 before pushing the button.
Ride your bike to a battery store they can check load with the battery in the bike. If its about done fore go to your dealer and complain. A battery should last three to four years.
 

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Could be the starter going out. There have been a few pop up as bad even though new. A bad batch from the manufacturer maybe?

Obviously doing a load test on the battery is the first thing though...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Just got back from the battery store, the battery checks out good, full charge, full load test passed. The store manager says this is not the first Vic battery he has seen, in his opinion Vic should have put a stronger battery in the bikes. He did not try to sell me a battery, told me to have the charging system and starter checked out first before thinking about replacing the battery. For that I give him credit, not trying to push a sale, more providing supportcheers

So I will look in the Service Manual and see if there is a Starter test, the bike is under warranty, but it is a haul to get to a Vic dealer I am willing to let touch my bike.:cool:
 

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Just got back from the battery store, the battery checks out good, full charge, full load test passed. The store manager says this is not the first Vic battery he has seen, in his opinion Vic should have put a stronger battery in the bikes. He did not try to sell me a battery, told me to have the charging system and starter checked out first before thinking about replacing the battery. For that I give him credit, not trying to push a sale, more providing supportcheers

So I will look in the Service Manual and see if there is a Starter test, the bike is under warranty, but it is a haul to get to a Vic dealer I am willing to let touch my bike.:cool:
What kind of battery is it? My Jackpot had a Yuasa in it and I replaced it with the same. They are good batteries as far as I know.
 
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