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Discussion Starter #1
OK, so I installed the EZ assist and took before and after measurements (see Pic's ) and proved to myself that it reduced the effort to pull the clutch in by 50%. Outstanding results. However, even after doing everything I could to make sure the clutch was adjusted correctly I never felt it was 100% engaged. Even though I had slack in the lever as required. So I just thought it was me. Then the other day I did acouple hours on the cone course and burned the clutch up on my 2012 CCT with only 9500 miles on it. Estimated repair cost $700. So I have decided if the EZ clutch is that sensitive I'm taking it off.
Some who have installed the hydralic clutches say it feels the same but they don't worry about broken cables, others say it feels less but they're not sure how much. You would think the manufactured would tell us but they don't.

This brings me to my question or request. Can someone who is adding the hydralic clutch to their bike do a before and after so we know for sure how much it reduces the effort to pull the clutch in?
I used a simple suit case weight measuring device you can buy at almost any store.
 

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I can't say from experience whether or not the hydro clutch will be worth the money but I can give some advice I have learned along the way.

It sounds like you found out the hard way about how the easy clutch being extremely sensitive to being adjusted just right or it will cause premature failure of the clutch plates.

While the manual says to not lube the cable; some of our better Victory mechanics have discovered that isn't exactly true. What happens is some kind of build up occurs inside the cable so using the right lube not only cleans it out it lubes it up. Using a good cable lube tool is also critical in getting the lube where it needs to be. Try using the product in the link below. I have and it works great!

http://www.protectall.com/searchresult.aspx?CategoryID=10

I prefer the two bolt Motion Pro luber below.

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Motion-Pro-08-0182-Cable-Lubber/dp/B0012TYX9W/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1423507171&sr=8-1&keywords=motion+pro+cable+luber[/ame]

You can also get the Cable Life lube through Amazon.

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Protect-All-25006-Lubricant-Aerosol/dp/B0022UOYTE/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1423507337&sr=8-10&keywords=cable+lube[/ame]

And lastly something most folks don't consider as we get older is a simple hand exerciser to keep that left forearm in shape to allow a good squeeze force.



[ame]http://www.amazon.com/ZON-ZNBK-HNDGRP-ZoN-Hand-Grips/dp/B005Y83SJI/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1423507452&sr=8-5&keywords=hand+exerciser[/ame]
 

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Hydraulic clutch isn't made to reduce pull effort. I'm not sure why some think it is, maybe they just want it to.
What MIGHT help is there is an actual adjustment of the lever that may make things feel easier and start you out in the wheelhouse instead of traveling the whole way through like the cable affords. It too needs to be adjusted correctly, and since I don't have any experience with a Vic conversion, I can't say.
I can say the Vic stock set up is a pretty easy smooth pull. Some may have cable problems, small hands or just not the physical stature and strength to ride a motorcycle. I wonder if these things bring out some of the gripes.
Not sure what I'll do if and when the time comes to give it up. My bet right now is another Mini though.

Good luck! cheers
 

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If you were blindfolded you cold not tell if you were pulling a cable clutch or a hydraulic one.
The Vic in no way has a easy pull clutch like the Honda or Harley and other models
 

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If you were blindfolded you cold not tell if you were pulling a cable clutch or a hydraulic one.
The Vic in no way has a easy pull clutch like the Honda or Harley and other models
I've only had my XC for 6 months now but I felt the clutch was pretty heavy. My buddy has an older King Pin and when I tried his clutch lever it felt about the same. He also compared the two and felt the same way.

I've since installed the hydraulic clutch and it feels not only lighter but smoother. Another comparison to my buddies King Pin and it does feel lighter. My buddy said the same thing.

Not saying it's a bunch but it did seem to make it better.

FWIW Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm coming from a previous bike that had hydralics and also figured since power steering and brakes makes things easier so should the hydralic clutch. If making things hydralic didn't help why would a manufacture install it?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The point of my original post was to prove it one way or the other with the simple test.
 

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I'm coming from a previous bike that had hydralics and also figured since power steering and brakes makes things easier so should the hydralic clutch. If making things hydralic didn't help why would a manufacture install it?
Not quite the same. Power steering utilizes a pump to boost hydraulic pressure. Power brakes use a vacuum booster (in most cases) to assist or reduce pedal effort. They aren't easier solely because they're hydraulic. Shut off the engine on a car with belt driven power steering while in motion and you'll see just how much assist that pump pressure delivers. Deplete the vacuum in the brake booster and see how much pedal effort it takes to stop the car with just the hydraulic brakes. A motorcycle hydraulic clutch has no assist. All it really does is eliminate the cable and any way to adjust free play and/or the engagement point. Lubing/maintaining a cable or flushing fluid and maybe needing to rebuild a master or slave cylinder seem like six of one half dozen of the other to me. Cable is $300 cheaper and is possible to repair roadside if necessary.

The Lloydz VPC seems to be the hot lick for lever effort reduction while ensuring no slippage. Machining is required.
Note that lever effort increases with RPM in case you like to do high RPM shifting.

http://www.lloydz.com/store/item_view.asp?estore_itemid=1000079

Tech23
 

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Discussion Starter #10

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That's an adjustable reach lever for people with small hands. It doesn't reduce lever effort it just makes the lever easier to reach...just like the XC brake lever. The problem with this is the closer you move the lever to the bar the more you reduce the clutch lever throw, because the lever bottoms out on the bar sooner. Bigger problem if you have fat grips. Victory already has a problem with insufficient throw...otherwise the easy clutch wouldn't be so fussy to get adjusted properly. This lever adjusted closer to the bar and combined with an easy clutch would eliminate locating that ever changing sweet spot that is so fussy to maintain and most likely make quick work of the clutch plates. I suspect there's a reason only the brake lever has the adjustable reach feature on the XC from the factory. Personally I don't think adjustable reach clutch levers are a good idea.

Tech23
 

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So I just thought it was me. Then the other day I did acouple hours on the cone course and burned the clutch up on my 2012 CCT with only 9500 miles on it.
if you are going to be doing extended time in the friction zone with the clutch, you have to give the bike and clutch time to cool down during your practice, you need to take a break about every 10 minutes and put the bike in 2nd and cruise around your parking lot or practice area with the clutch out.

I burned up the clutch in my Yamaha Raider the same way. I knew better but i forgot to do the cool down. Clutch plates are not hard to rep;ace so you might consider doing it yourself and saving a couple hundred or more.
 
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