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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
First, some background. I currently ride a 2004 Honda VTX 1800N1 that I bought new in 04. This has been the only street bike I've ever owned, though I have ridden others for short distances. I bought my X as a gift to myself after getting home from Iraq- was sitting in my driveway a week after I got home. Anyway, I just wanted to add that as the X is the only bike I have extensive seat time in to compare to (28K miles on her now).

I've been wanting to move up to a full touring machine for a year or so now. I rode my VTX 1400 miles round trip to Deal's Gap back in 2010. I added a real cruise control, so that helped a lot. I love the VTX, especially the abundant torque, but even though I have some bags and sissy bar luggage, it's just not set up like a full touring machine is.

Today, the local dealer had a test ride day for the Victory bikes. I picked out a blue XCT and spend half an hour on it in mixed city and highway / interstate riding. Here are my first impressions:

Good:

Love the suspension. The XCT has a 20mm narrower front tire than my VTX (130 vs 150), so it feels a bit more nimble in quick swerves and falls into the curves a bit easier. The XCT soaks up the bumps much better. I have the rear suspension on my VTX on the softest setting, but I can still feel virtually every pebble I roll over. That's the difference between a power cruiser and a touring machine, I suppose. I wouldn't mind the XCT's suspension being a little softer yet, but I suppose that's adjustable via the rear shock air pressure.

I didn't realize how much I would enjoy having some tunes. Damn, I'm gonna miss that already. I think the volume ramp up is a bit aggressive- I found myself turning the radio up at stop lights and back down again while under way at speed. Maybe there is a sensitivity setting for that somewhere? The iPod kit or some way to adapt my phone (Android) would be a must.

The seat was very comfortable, if a bit narrow. I'm used to the Ultimate Big Boy seat I put on my VTX. I don't think the narrower seat is a bad thing, just different. I would need the driver backrest, however. I'm used to it on the X.

Love the integrated cruise control. I wouldn't have a bike without it again. Standard heated grips are nice, though at 80+ today I didn't test them, obviously. The louvers in the lower fairing do a fantastic job controlling how much air the driver gets.... much appreciated.

6 Speeds!!! Even today I occasionally look for that non-existent 6th gear on my VTX on the interstate. The XCT seems much more suited to high speed long distance cruising. Having a tach and fuel gauge helps here too.



The bad:

This bike doesn't have near the stones that my VTX does off the line or at speed. I suspect that's a combination of the XCT being heavier by a hundred pounds or so and my VTX is equipped with a Barnett clutch. Maybe a high performance clutch replacement would help some? While we are talking about the clutch, I've been spoiled by the VTX's hydraulic clutch. I don't understand why Victory doesn't put a hydraulic clutch on the XCT but they do on the Vision. I understand that there retrofit kits, so that would be another must. The VTX also has a set of Jardine drags and a Kury Hi-Five air cleaner, likely adding a few HP. What would the Victory Stage 1 get me?

The mirrors are set ridiculously narrow. I have to angle them out so far to see past my own shoulders (I'm a big guy at 6'5" and 250 lbs) that a car can easily hide in the gap behind me. I have Kury Scythe mirrors on my VTX to correct this same problem. It's worse (stock) on the XCT though.

Even as tall as I am, I have to look right through the upper edge of the windshield or slouch a little to look through it. I'm not sure which shield this bike was equipped with, but I think I would want something else.

No heal shifter. Easily remedied through Victory, but I instantly missed it from my X. Interestingly, I don't miss it when I ride my wife's 2011 Suzuki C50T. That bike has boards too, so you would think I would be reaching for that heal shifter there also. Strange. I use it all the time on the VTX and I kept reaching for it on the XCT.

Vibration is a little different than what I'm used to. That's the difference between a rubber mounted engine and one that's a stressed frame member, I guess. I wish the XCT was a bit smoother at highway speeds, though.

The tach seems slow to respond. It had me wondering if the clutch was slipping on high torque upshifts.

The so-so:

The bar angle and spacing is quite a bit different. For such a large bike the grips seem pretty close together. As soon as I took off it felt quite strange coming from the VTX, where the grips have quite wide spacing from the beach style bar. I got used to it a lot faster than I thought I would, and then getting back on the VTX felt strange, lol.

The lower fairing storage compartments are pretty flimsy. I think they could have made them lockable and of better construction, especially on a $20K+ bike.

Overall I was very pleased with the bike. I can see how, with a few modifications, it will be a great long-distance touring machine for me.
 

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Great comparo. I've never ridden a VTX1800, and often wondered how they stack against each other. The comment about vibration caught me tho. My Cross Roads is smooth as butter at highway speed.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I probably notice it just because it's different than what I'm used to. Likely different harmonics transmitted to the frame vs the VTX with it's rubber mounted engine. I do remember riding a friends Ultra Glide a few years ago. I could never get used to that bike- too small. However, the vibration at idle was not annoying and once underway the bike was glass-smooth.... much more so than my VTX or the XCT.

I really do wish the XCT had the torque low down that my VTX has. Maybe it's a difference of shaft vs belt drive? The VTX seems to be solidly connected to the engine through the transmission. The XCT seems like it can only be soft-launched. Maybe that is belt stretch vs the solid shaft that I'm feeling? The VTX does have torque snubbers in the wheel to make the power transition a bit smoother, though. Also, I noticed a soft clunk in the XCT when transitioning from engine braking to engine power. Dunno if that is normal or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I should add that the frame seems quite a bit more solid on the XCT. Hard jolts seem to send quivers through the entire VTX, where on the XCT I can feel the suspension working to minimize this and what jolts do get through are solidly controlled by the frame. That is a great improvement. cheers
 

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I added higher/wider mirrors to my XCT because I am not a small guy and have the same issue.

One of these days I'm gonna install the Lloydz timing wheel, I'm under the impression that will help a lot with power.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #7
ok you tried the XCT which is great, but did you try the Vision? thats another kettle of fish and one of the best touring bikes on the planet.
No, but I should have. I will probably still get the XCT, though. I want maximum cargo capacity for long distance touring. Might get the wife a Vision when she's ready to step up again.
 

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I can relate to what you're saying about TQ down low. I came from the other TQ-monster, the 125 cubic inch Vulcan. With all the mods I've done to my XR, I still miss the instant pull of the big Vulcan. My XR is a faster bike now than the Vulcan was, but the low-end is lacking.
I've owned a lot of high-rpm cars (M3,S2000,etc.), but I still miss the low end of a 427 Vette or an 8.3 liter Viper. I feel the same about the Vic 106.
 

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thhis thread reminds me of the saying "there's no replacement for displacement!!!"
 

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All it needs is a little work, like cams, timing wheel, Lloydz HP filter, dyno, different mufflers and it'll have plenty of power.

It's a great touring bike for sure. thumb up
thumb up

The Lloydz timing advance wheel does wonders for that vibration you talk about also. Vibs the rider feels almost become non-existant.
 

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All it needs is a little work, like cams, timing wheel, Lloydz HP filter, dyno, different mufflers and it'll have plenty of power.

It's a great touring bike for sure. thumb up
I have those mods and still the low end TQ is missing compared to a VTX or the Vulcan 125".
 

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I have those mods and still the low end TQ is missing compared to a VTX or the Vulcan 125".
Unless you start adding big bore kits and increase the compression on the 106 it is never going to make that kind of really low end torque that the big inch metric twins make.

On my 113" Yamaha you could be rolling at 1700 rpm and crank the throttle and the engine wouldn't even blink. On the 106" Victory if you did that the engine would hate you. But, on the big Yamaha you were done making power by 4700 rpm where as on the Victory it will make power up to redline and past. The Victory has plenty of power but it does have to be driven a little differently.

Look at the engine stats:
VTX 1800: 101mm bore x 112mm stroke, 3 valve heads, SOHC, 120 ft-lbs torque @ 3500 rpm (factory claimed)
Yamaha 1900: 100mm bore x 118mm stroke, 4 valves, pushrod, 123 ft-lbs torque @ 2500 rpm (factory claimed)
Vulcan 2000: 103mm bore x 123.2mm stroke, 4 valves, DOHC, 142 ft-lbs torque @ 3200 rpm(factory claimed)
Victory 106: 101mm bore x 108mm stroke, 4 valves, DOHC, 109 ft-lbs torque @ 4300 rpm

We all know that longer piston stroke generally equals more low end torque (but limits max engine rpm). And the VTX utilizes 3 valve heads which helps low end power as well but is not as good for higher rpms. The Victory was designed around mid range power, it's never going to be a torque monster. You have to learn to ride it differently than the big displacement metric twins. Once you do it will reward you with plenty of power. Just not at 2000 rpm.
 

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I have those mods and still the low end TQ is missing compared to a VTX or the Vulcan 125".
I hear you but I wonder if you lost some low end torque going with the D&D mufflers not sure.

I know with my mufflers, I didn't loose any low end torque and she has a lot.
 

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I hear you but I wonder if you lost some low end torque going with the D&D mufflers not sure.

I know with my mufflers, I didn't loose any low end torque and she has a lot.
According to the research I did before getting the D&Ds, I didn't lose low end. That was important to me.
 

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Unless you start adding big bore kits and increase the compression on the 106 it is never going to make that kind of really low end torque that the big inch metric twins make.

On my 113" Yamaha you could be rolling at 1700 rpm and crank the throttle and the engine wouldn't even blink. On the 106" Victory if you did that the engine would hate you. But, on the big Yamaha you were done making power by 4700 rpm where as on the Victory it will make power up to redline and past. The Victory has plenty of power but it does have to be driven a little differently.

Look at the engine stats:
VTX 1800: 101mm bore x 112mm stroke, 3 valve heads, SOHC, 120 ft-lbs torque @ 3500 rpm (factory claimed)
Yamaha 1900: 100mm bore x 118mm stroke, 4 valves, pushrod, 123 ft-lbs torque @ 2500 rpm (factory claimed)
Vulcan 2000: 103mm bore x 123.2mm stroke, 4 valves, DOHC, 142 ft-lbs torque @ 3200 rpm(factory claimed)
Victory 106: 101mm bore x 108mm stroke, 4 valves, DOHC, 109 ft-lbs torque @ 4300 rpm

We all know that longer piston stroke generally equals more low end torque (but limits max engine rpm). And the VTX utilizes 3 valve heads which helps low end power as well but is not as good for higher rpms. The Victory was designed around mid range power, it's never going to be a torque monster. You have to learn to ride it differently than the big displacement metric twins. Once you do it will reward you with plenty of power. Just not at 2000 rpm.
The Vulcan shows 142 TQ, but a simple ($1) mod removes the TQ-limiter in the first 3 gears and really wakes it up. Don't get me wrong; I'm very happy with my XR, but just miss the low end sometimes. I've learned to ride it differently and it feels good most of the time.
 

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The Vulcan shows 142 TQ, but a simple ($1) mod removes the TQ-limiter in the first 3 gears and really wakes it up. Don't get me wrong; I'm very happy with my XR, but just miss the low end sometimes. I've learned to ride it differently and it feels good most of the time.
That 142 is at the crank though it's still impressive.
 
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