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Something most people do not know is that almost all curves on roads are built to have a constant radius. What that means is once you are in the curve and turn the steering wheel of a car to a position that will handle the initial portion of the curve, the rest of the curve will take the exact same steering wheel position. On a bike it is more complicated because there is a speed factor. However, once you are in a curve and have a fairly constant speed and have the bike lean and the bar position all set for the initial portion of the curve that you are in, the exact same settings will work for the rest of the curve provided you do not change speed.

Civil engineers who design the roads do this on purpose to make the curves easier to navigate for even the low skilled driver/rider.

There are a very small number of curves that are either increasing or decreasing radius and these keep you on your toes but they are typically only going to be on very twisty roads. For example, the famous Tail of the Dragon between NC and TN has some decreasing or increasing radius turns depending on which direction you are riding it.

So rather than turn-straight-turn-straight, try making smaller adjustments while always looking far ahead and looking where you want the bike to go. See if you can find the lean angle and bar position that will hold your line at whatever speed you are running.
 

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I'll probably get yelled at for this.
When I am on the highway during a long banking turn.
I find my self turning than straightening out than turning and straightening out repeatedly till I am out of the turn
That sounds to me like a case of not looking through the turn, as far as you can see ... all the time while turning.

I don't remember having that problem much on a bike, but I took the MSF beginner course just as soon as I bought my first bike (at age 49 -- I'm 72 now).

But I do remember having a similar problem in a straight line(!), when I first learning how to drive a car, 54 years ago. I could not figure out how drivers, e.g., my parents, could just drive along a highway, without making constant steering adjustments, which is what I was doing. The problem was that I was looking down at the road, not looking a long, long, way ahead. Once I learned to look, and aim for, say, a quarter or eighth of a mile upstream on the highway, the issue of constant steering adjustments disappeared.

And so I'm suggesting that the same thing is happening to you, on the curves, because you're looking too close to the front wheel, as opposed to looking around the curve. And if you concentrate on far-away, through-the-curve, look, during your practice riding, you should become much better.

When I was 57, I took additional training, and got certified as an MSF RiderCoach. One saying I learned early on from the more experienced instructors was to tell those who passed the class, at the conclusion of the weekend, that "Congratulations: you're now qualified to ride 20 MPH in a parking lot." The point being, it takes real-world practice, after that first class, to even come close to mastering real-world skills.
 

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Do you drive a car? If so, do you have the same issues on the highway when you drive? If not, where to you look when driving, right in front of your car or down the road where you want the car to go. Wash, rinse, repeat.

One other point. Do you remember your training from the MSF course involving "counter steering"? If not, you need to re-take the course.
 

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Another option, if you are better with printed materials, is "Proficient Motorcycling" and "More Proficient Motorcycling - Mastering the Ride" by David Hough. You can probably find them on Amazon or Ebay. I'd suggest Barnes and Nobles but I know those in my area are closed right now. But maybe another option is to stay off the superslab highways and stick to the slower country roads till you build your confidence at speed and can get the hang of looking through curves and focus on where you want to go and not target fixate on the curves themselves. this way you are less likely to get passed by anyone for a while. then when your confidence is solid and your skills sharper you can tackle the highways again.
I know a couple riders who won't drive the highways for that very reason, because they are not comfortable with the speeds and how some of the zombies in their cages drive, specially with more and more distracted driving... but there is a lot of good advice here..


Proficient Motorcycling

More Proficient Motorcycling

ebooks are available as well...
amazon
 

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Discussion Starter #26
When ever I go out to practice on the country roads ... 55mph speed limit
There always seems to be car/truck behind me.

To be honest I have never heard the term look through the curve.
 

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To be honest I have never heard the term look through the curve.
Either you didn't take the basic class or your instructors failed horribly.
 

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Hey @band1t, I think we've all given you the benefit of the doubt and assumed you're not here just pulling our legs. While re-reading your post and your replies, I cannot help but wonder what brings you to motorcycle riding? You complain the roads have curves, you say you're the slowest traffic participant, you get pushed around by cross winds. Is someone making you ride a motorcycle? Speaking of motorcycles, what do you ride?
 

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band1t
do you remember push-pull from your class's? Don't push or pull hard just learn by feel.
Its second nature to us and at times forget about it

 

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Discussion Starter #31
To answer the questions you guys are asking.
Yes I took the class.
I have been jogging my brain and can't recall them ever saying "look through the curve" …. sorry
Yes I do remember them talking about push pull though.
I ride a 2014 HD Fat bob
I'll gladly admit the Kawasakis the class had was a much easier bike to ride
everything was right there and I wasn't all stretch out on it like I am with the HD.

Go try this
Go to your car
Scoot the seat all the way back as far as it will go
Reach for the wheel
Than go for a drive
That how riding the bike feels like.

I hope this helps answers the questions you guys have been asking
 

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Go try this
Go to your car
Scoot the seat all the way back as far as it will go
Reach for the wheel
Than go for a drive
That how riding the bike feels like.
Sounds to me like the bike might be a tad on the large size for you as a rider.
 

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To answer the questions you guys are asking.
Yes I took the class.
I have been jogging my brain and can't recall them ever saying "look through the curve" …. sorry
Yes I do remember them talking about push pull though.
I ride a 2014 HD Fat bob
I'll gladly admit the Kawasakis the class had was a much easier bike to ride
everything was right there and I wasn't all stretch out on it like I am with the HD.

Go try this
Go to your car
Scoot the seat all the way back as far as it will go
Reach for the wheel
Than go for a drive
That how riding the bike feels like.

I hope this helps answers the questions you guys have been asking
My favorite riding position (after you add some apes). My riding buddy likes his feet under him. That position hurts my knees.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Sounds to me like the bike might be a tad on the large size for you as a rider.
It is
I'll 100% agree to that.
No issue stretching my legs out
But the drag bars on it I am not a fan of them
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Like I said the Kawasaki was a lot easier to ride
because there was no need to stretch out to grab the bars
 

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Am I the only one cracking up while reading this?
 

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Let's see. First bike,,,,,Too big,,,,HD,,,,,low speeds,,,,,,passed by semi's,,,,,can't turn,,,,,,straight line,,,,,.

You bought a bar hopper!!!

Maybe someone on one of the HD forums can give some pointers on parking etiquette at the pub and current Tshirt styles.

Or trade the big'un in on a few of those Kawasakis.

(Just yanking your chain.) (I think)
 

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To answer the questions you guys are asking.
Yes I took the class.
I have been jogging my brain and can't recall them ever saying "look through the curve" …. sorry
Yes I do remember them talking about push pull though.
I ride a 2014 HD Fat bob
I'll gladly admit the Kawasakis the class had was a much easier bike to ride
everything was right there and I wasn't all stretch out on it like I am with the HD.

Go try this
Go to your car
Scoot the seat all the way back as far as it will go
Reach for the wheel
Than go for a drive
That how riding the bike feels like.

I hope this helps answers the questions you guys have been asking
You aware that they make bar-backs, bar extenders, whatever you like to call them? They attach to the area that the handlebars clamp to. Typically, they position the handlebars up to inch closer to you; that sounds small, but it makes a major difference.

I'm a little puzzled here, though. If you ride an HD, why are you posting on a Victory forum? Did I misunderstand something?
 
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