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Does your exhaust look like this:

If so you could drill a couple of holes in the back of them and install a couple of hardware store thumb screws like this:
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They can be up in the pipe past the slash where they are not noticeable.
Initially turn them perpendicular to the pipe as they are in the photo.
Take it for a ride and see if that gets rid of the stumble and the black soot.
If so either leave them where they are, or turn them incrementally parallel to the pipe till it begins to stumble then creep it back till the stumble again stops.
I think these are 5/16” thumbscrews. Size isn’t too important. But you need the flattened part centered in the pipe, at least initially. What doesn’t come across in the photo is that the thumbscrew is about 1-1/2 inches in front of the smaller outlet hole of the muffler. It isn’t restricting the exhaust flow only minimally and only at WOT. In your case the flag of it likely will end up turned parallel or replaced with a simple bolt. Or the flag greatly reduced in size. So drill the hole where it will not be noticeable. But you can still get it in and out.

This will tell you if reversion is your issue. Might save you the cost of a power commander and the hours installing it and getting the map correct. Then not addressing the root of the problem.

If these don’t work you can easily remove them and all you will have is a couple of neatly drilled holes in the back of your pipes. Hopefully where they are not too noticeable.

There is nothing magical about the thumbscrews. They are generally cheap and easy, as close as your nearest Ace hardware store. Anything that will break up the rebounding pressure wave will work for a test to see if your problem is reversion. The photo is of a poorly designed aftermarket muffler on a gl1500.
Edit:
After thinking about this a bit, if your pipes are as on the above bike you could cut a couple of inch or so wide pieces of aluminum angle and clamp them onto slash section of the pipe with small c clamps. Flat side facing the hole in the pipe. Your not trying to create back pressure, so leave a big gap. Your just dispersing the pressure wave that would return up the pipe after the exhaust pulse exits. ( the exiting exhaust forced the atmospheric air out of the way and it then rushes back in to the void and up the pipe because it is below atmospheric pressure at that moment in the exhaust cycle. You need to break that return pulse up and take some of the energy and inertia out of it. That is what you are after.
Anyway no holes drilled in your exhaust that way till your certain you have found your problem. Put a bit of aluminum or brass under the screw of the c clamp before you tighten it to keep from scratching the chrome.
Using a 1-1/4“ water pipe nipple as a form and a hammer form a radius on the other leg of the angle that approximates the radius of the slash portion of the pipe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Does your exhaust look like this:

If so you could drill a couple of holes in the back of them and install a couple of hardware store thumb screws like this:
View attachment 258462



They can be up in the pipe past the slash where they are not noticeable.
Initially turn them perpendicular to the pipe as they are in the photo.
Take it for a ride and see if that gets rid of the stumble and the black soot.
If so either leave them where they are, or turn them incrementally parallel to the pipe till it begins to stumble then creep it back till the stumble again stops.
I think these are 5/16” thumbscrews. Size isn’t too important. But you need the flattened part centered in the pipe, at least initially. What doesn’t come across in the photo is that the thumbscrew is about 1-1/2 inches in front of the smaller outlet hole of the muffler. It isn’t restricting the exhaust flow only minimally and only at WOT. In your case the flag of it likely will end up turned parallel or replaced with a simple bolt. Or the flag greatly reduced in size. So drill the hole where it will not be noticeable. But you can still get it in and out.

This will tell you if reversion is your issue. Might save you the cost of a power commander and the hours installing it and getting the map correct. Then not addressing the root of the problem.

If these don’t work you can easily remove them and all you will have is a couple of neatly drilled holes in the back of your pipes. Hopefully where they are not too noticeable.

There is nothing magical about the thumbscrews. They are generally cheap and easy, as close as your nearest Ace hardware store. Anything that will break up the rebounding pressure wave will work for a test to see if your problem is reversion. The photo is of a poorly designed aftermarket muffler on a gl1500.
Edit:
After thinking about this a bit, if your pipes are as on the above bike you could cut a couple of inch or so wide pieces of aluminum angle and clamp them onto slash section of the pipe with small c clamps. Flat side facing the hole in the pipe. Your not trying to create back pressure, so leave a big gap. Your just dispersing the pressure wave that would return up the pipe after the exhaust pulse exits. ( the exiting exhaust forced the atmospheric air out of the way and it then rushes back in to the void and up the pipe because it is below atmospheric pressure at that moment in the exhaust cycle. You need to break that return pulse up and take some of the energy and inertia out of it. That is what you are after.
Anyway no holes drilled in your exhaust that way till your certain you have found your problem. Put a bit of aluminum or brass under the screw of the c clamp before you tighten it to keep from scratching the chrome.
Using a 1-1/4“ water pipe nipple as a form and a hammer form a radius on the other leg of the angle that approximates the radius of the slash portion of the pipe.
This is the exhuast i have. As someone stated above, it sounds like the baffles are removed especially on deceleration. Great idea with the thumb screws! Ill give it a try
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I would clean your throttle body or if that isn't a job you are comfortable trying yourself, find a good mechanic to do it for you. As someone previously stated, Victory motorcycles run rich already. Almost every Victory I have worked on and had running issues, it was a dirty fouled up throttle body. These bikes are almost bullet proof, so always check the maintenance missed issues before thinking the bike has an issue.

I see it has after market pipes, which tells me it most likely has a non-paper filter. When the oiled type filters get used, it adds even more to the throttle body's grime build up. They do not close fully, more fuel dumped into bike and more watery oily crap comes out of pipe.

After you have it done, you are going to still have it coming out for sometime due to build up in the pipes. Ride it hard and hot for several hundred miles, but I can almost guarantee, that will eliminate your issue. It should also increase your fuel efficiency a little and make the bike perform a little better as well
 

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I just went through this on my 92 vic. My back spocket was always covered in crap.
While adjusting the front spocket....I noticed the SEAL was leaking.
so I pulled the sprocket off,...replaced the SEAL , ]
It must have been slinging the oil to the back of the bike. Since changing the front seal, I dont have any crap on the rear sprocket. just my 2cents
 
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