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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have always wanted to have my pipes (RPW Big Slash) tested in order to know where I stand should I ever be pulled over in one of the random testing roadblocks. Today I had the chance to test them without having to do the roadblock, I was at an event where they offered the testing for a nominal fee (it was a fund raiser for Children's Wish), so I took advantage of the opportunity to get my answers.

My pipes were 1 Decibel over the accepted testing range on one of the category's they test for.

If any of you would like to know how they do this test, what the numbers are that set the legal limit etc, go to this site (you may have to cut and past the site, if it does not open on clicking it), it explains the complete procedures. I found it very helpful in giving me the answers that cleared up the mystery on how it all is done.

http://www.bccom-bc.com/events/sound-test.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
By the skin of his teeth !:D

By the skin of HER teeth, Jayson :p

My test came out with my pipes 1 decibel over the required maximum. I don't think they would push it as it is a variable that would change within my riding the bike. It was within the part of the test when I had to put the bike at 5,000 rpm, and I would not be at 5,000 rpm for a sustained amount of time (well, maybe.....) for the bulk of my riding , especially seeing as they are slanting the testing (I think) towards city riding, where your pipes may disturb other members of the population.

I guess technically I am not a pass. But I am a lot more at ease as to where I stand should a test come up. I don't think a cop would push the issue should it be an actual test with a device, but I may come across someone who just uses his ear as judgement and deems them too loud. Then I will fight it.

Decibel (Loudness) Comparison Chart

Here are some interesting numbers, collected from a variety of sources, that help one to understand the volume levels of various sources and how they can affect our hearing.

ENVIRONMENTAL SOUNDS
Weakest sound heard 0dB
Whisper Quiet Library at 6' 30dB
Normal conversation at 3' 60-65dB
Telephone dial tone 80dB
City Traffic (inside car) 85dB
Train whistle at 500', Truck Traffic 90dB
Jackhammer at 50' 95dB
Subway train at 200' 95dB
Level at which sustained exposure may result in hearing loss 90 - 95dB
Hand Drill 98dB
Power mower at 3' 107dB
Snowmobile, Motorcycle 100dB
Power saw at 3' 110dB
Sandblasting, Loud Rock Concert 115dB
Pain begins 125dB
Pneumatic riveter at 4' 125dB
Even short term exposure can cause permanent damage - Loudest recommended exposure WITH hearing protection 140dB
Jet engine at 100' 140dB
12 Gauge Shotgun Blast 165dB
Death of hearing tissue 180dB
Loudest sound possible 194dB

I guess we better all buy earplugs :rolleyes:
 

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...Motorcycle 100dB...
Motorcycle is too general. You can't have a loud chopper and a Singer sewing machine melted in the same category, and labeled at 100dB. But ear protection is always good. thumb up
 
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