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Now that is a beautiful bike with some nice options.

As the owner of the same bike, color and year, I don't think you can go wrong.

I love mine and have over 70,000 very happy miles on it.
 

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Cross Roads is heavier, more stable, and has way more storage. The storage capacity of those bags is truly ludicrous.

I found it to be a big step up in comfort when I traded in my 2004 Kingpin for a 2012 Cross Roads. I never rode my KP farther than about 125 miles, and was sore and tired when I got off of it. I rode the XR more than 500 miles in a day, over the course of several weeks on a cross-country trip, and didn't regret it. The XR just eats miles and asks for more.

Kind of like your Roadmaster, but not as big :)
 

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Discussion Starter #63
Now that is a beautiful bike with some nice options.

As the owner of the same bike, color and year, I don't think you can go wrong.

I love mine and have over 70,000 very happy miles on it.
If take the trunk off my RM, it sounds like I have a CR. Did the CC handle like the KP? I probably will not be taking any long trips on it, but you never know?
 

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I would avoid the 2010 CR. There are some parts, like the speedo, that are unobtainable if they go bad.

Otherwise I would choose a CR over the KP. With all things being equal the CR will be an all around better bike for local and longer distance riding. I would choose one with the locking hard bags unless you got a good deal on a classic.
 

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I agree with what @BBob said, exactly.

I liked the way the KP handled. Until I rode a XR. A specific example I can give you is that the KP was nervewracking to ride on textured pavement (where the road crew has taken a layer off with a grater, prior to repaving), because the narrower front wheel tended to get caught up in the grooves. The XR, by contrast, is perfectly stable on the same type of pavement.

I definitely agree that getting the hard bags over the leather ones is the way to go. My XR had the soft bags, and I ended up acquiring hard bags to replace them, and never looked back.
 

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Discussion Starter #67
I would avoid the 2010 CR. There are some parts, like the speedo, that are unobtainable if they go bad.

Otherwise I would choose a CR over the KP. With all things being equal the CR will be an all around better bike for local and longer distance riding. I would choose one with the locking hard bags unless you got a good deal on a classic.
Thanks for the heads up. I plan on keeping whatever I buy. This is an exhausting process?
 

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Didn't mean to dissuade you from purcashing the Kingpin, by the way. They're two different bikes, and they're both really good ones, each in its own way. Personally, I'd tell you to test ride both of them, and then buy the one you enjoy riding more.
 

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Personally, I think that the Cross Roads is a touring cruiser. You already have a touring bike. Do you really want another one?

Since you're planning on keeping your Roadmaster (which is a wonderful touring bike), I think I'd encourage you to look more toward a fun power cruiser than toward another touring cruiser. Something like a Vegas, or a Hammer, or even an Octane. Those are distinctly not touring bikes, but they sure are a ton of fun to ride.

But again, I'd recommend actually finding all of the bikes that peak your interest, and riding each of them at least once. Then, pick the bike that you enjoy riding the most.
 

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That is what I was wrestling with. Gunner?
I think that a Gunner would also be a good model for you to look at. Just remember that Victory, like Indian, had several different lines of bikes, each of which served a different audience, and many of which ride very differently. This is why actually riding the bike is so important, in my opinion.
 
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Thanks for the heads up. I plan on keeping whatever I buy. This is an exhausting process?
Yeah; it can be. I love to ride my KP but it does have a slow speed over steer that doesn't inspire confidence. It was easy enough to get used to but for someone not used to it I can see how it would be a turn off.

If you can find a lowish mile CR you would likely be happy for many moons. If you buy one from an original owner who kept good records and shows you how well he maintained it; even one with 50-75k miles would be okay. Especially if he mentions he generally rode it out of town on trips or weekend day rides. Around town is the hardest on any vehicle; car or bike.
 

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2016's probably got all the best tech and refinements victory developed, right up to the year before they were shuttered by polaris. If it were me choosing between those two, personally, I'd go for the 2016 with far fewer miles.

But, as BBob said: really, it's personal preference here. Again, I'm going to recommend that you actually ride the bike(s) first, and then pick the one that you enjoy riding the most. :)

In the end, everyone else's opinion matters little: it's going to be your bike. You are the one who needs to be happy with it.
 

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Personally, I think that the Cross Roads is a touring cruiser. You already have a touring bike. Do you really want another one?

Since you're planning on keeping your Roadmaster (which is a wonderful touring bike), I think I'd encourage you to look more toward a fun power cruiser than toward another touring cruiser. Something like a Vegas, or a Hammer, or even an Octane. Those are distinctly not touring bikes, but they sure are a ton of fun to ride.

But again, I'd recommend actually finding all of the bikes that peak your interest, and riding each of them at least once. Then, pick the bike that you enjoy riding the most.
Get a hammer s
 
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