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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
UPDATE: Low/moderate speed wobble and looseness

I have searched this is bit before posting, but most issues seem to be pertinent to higher speeds. My bike is a 2014 Cross Roads 8-Ball, bought new from a dealer August '15. It now has about 2,000 miles on it.

A few weeks ago, I began noticing an intermittent wobble or sensation of the rear end feeling loose when going around a corner. It feels like as if the rear tire was super deflated or flat, but it's not. I don't notice it all the time, but this past Sunday it began to feel more regular, almost with every turn, particularly left-hand turns. I was on a large charity ride, cruising about 40 mph on a section highway. At first I thought it was those tar-filled cracks/seals on the road that were influencing the tires. When we turned left off an exit onto a local road, I felt like it had a pronounced slide, wobble, or looseness in the rear end.

That was enough to make me pull the safety card and pullover out of the pack. A buddy stopped with me and we proceeded to pull the hard bags and visually inspect everything we could. The rear tire pressure was fine at 40 psi (front was fine too). The rear shock (which I hadn't adjusted since I bought it) seemed to barely register on the tire pressure gauge, if at all. We hand checked the tightness on bolts surrounding the axle, swing arm, pulley, etc. Basically anything surrounding the drive train, we tried to check on the spot. We didn't find anything with our bare hands. My Harley riding buddy stated he felt like the belt was really tight. I honestly couldn't give a good opinion on the matter, but it seemed pretty tight to me too. The alignment marks for the axle bolt are in the same position on both sides.

More on the shock pressure. We decided to put some air into the shock. Once we found a gas station whose air filler would fit on the valve, we put enough air into the shock to bring it to 25-30 psi. I'd say there was 0-5 psi previously. This did cause a noticeable lift in the bike. We kind of laughed at how pronounced it was. Now, I weigh about 185-190 lbs. Probably 195ish with all my gear on. I did have a little bit of cargo in the saddle bags, largely rain gear in one side and a couple 16 oz bottles of water in the other. I did not have a back rest, trunk or passenger on the bike, so I had never added air to the shock.

I am supposed to be going on a trip next Thursday (6/23) over 4 days with the bike. Of course, I am being very cautious and want to be sure the bike is safe for such a long trip. The local dealers are busy as expected, so they can't get a proper service appointment set for a couple weeks out. One dealer (thank you Falcone Powersports!) did offer to give the bike a once-over squeezed in next Wednesday to check the belt, test ride, and give as much quick glance to it as they can before my trip.

Any other suggestions? I'm kind of in panic mode on trying to sort this out before my trip next week. :confused:
 

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Make sure the rear wheel is straight in the swingarm. You can get all kinds of weird chassis wiggles from inconsistent tire patch.
 

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A wobble can be the result of many things. I found that my XR came with loose Steering head bearings, so check them for proper torque. I discovered that when the bike was on the lift and I could yank on the bottom of the forks and feel back and forth movement.
I average around 30psi in the shock--40psi when loaded. An aired up shock will help with handling.
 

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Bad tire? May just be a fluke with a bad patch of rubber.

Keep air in that shock, it really helps with the ride quality and cornering.
 

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first off all belts will tighten up after ridding. Its just normal.
The inside of the tire could have bad cords even if the outside looks good.
You haven't said if adding air to shock help.
I would say go out and ride it again before the dealer gets it.
Try running it up to 70 mph and back down. Maybe your friend can ride with you. Even leave the bags at home so he can see the rear wheel.
If you can afford it put a new rear tire on or have dealer take it off the rim and inspect it and rebalance it
 

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Supesguy, Sorry to hear of your wobble issues.

Hope you get it resolved quickly and easily!

Please report back when you do, I think we are all curious?
 

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VJ mentioned broken tire cords as being a possibility and I concur. There may be an indication of that if you feel the tire for a slight bulge with the flat of your hand.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the input guys! Sorry, I forgot to comment on the effect of adding air to the rear shock. It did help! The bike definitely seemed much more poised and consistent through the curves. However, I still think I'm feeling the looseness/symptom on occasion. Again, it seems prominent when making left-hand turns. This could support many of your comments about a tire cord being broken or something else wrong with the tire. If there is a defect in the tire on the left and the tire gets loaded with force accordingly when making a left hand turn, I could see where the symptom could arise.

As for belt tightness, it's amazing how much it tightens up when hot. Wow!

I will have to research how to check wheel alignment prior to have the dealer look at it next week. Although, it almost makes me wonder if I should have the rear wheel removed and tire inspected first. This sucks, all these things cost money with no guarantee of problem resolution. I expect a new rear tire to cost ~$400 after labor/service.
 

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If tire has an issur with belts or bubbles, you could see & feel it - get a buddy to sit on the bike & slowly roll it forward. If you pop off bags, you can check the alignment marks on rear axle oval washers & sanity-check alignment with a yardstick against back tire & verify where it points when checking each side - an extra set of hands & eyes always help!
 

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Supes...If you have a lift, removing the rear wheel is so easy that this 80 year old does it. First bike I had in 64 years of riding that doesn't need the pipes to be removed to slide out the axle bolt. FYI: Removing the rear wheel does not change the alignment either.
 

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This won't help your wobble, but it may eliminate another problem.

In about five years of reading this and the other forum, I have read about problems with shocks when powered air supplies have been used. That is, it's my understanding that even without pumping the shock beyond its max capacity, it's possible to overload the guts by the sheer force of too much air, too quickly coming in.

So, you may want to invest in a hand pump, if you don't already have one at home. I believe the one at your Vic dealer is a rebranded Fox pump, e.g., https://www.amazon.com/Fox-Racing-Shox-Shock-027-00-007/dp/B001F212OK (which of course is cheaper without the Vic logo), or maybe something from a local H-D dealer, that sort of thing.

Me, I have one of those in my saddlebag, but the XCTs have storage space for all sorts of things.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Supes...If you have a lift, removing the rear wheel is so easy that this 80 year old does it. First bike I had in 64 years of riding that doesn't need the pipes to be removed to slide out the axle bolt. FYI: Removing the rear wheel does not change the alignment either.
How is it the pipes don't get in the way? Does the swingarm and rear wheel drop down that much when the bike is jacked up on a lift? Looking at it on the ground, the axle bolt is directly in line with the pipes on both sides.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
This won't help your wobble, but it may eliminate another problem.

In about five years of reading this and the other forum, I have read about problems with shocks when powered air supplies have been used. That is, it's my understanding that even without pumping the shock beyond its max capacity, it's possible to overload the guts by the sheer force of too much air, too quickly coming in.

So, you may want to invest in a hand pump, if you don't already have one at home. I believe the one at your Vic dealer is a rebranded Fox pump, e.g., https://www.amazon.com/Fox-Racing-Shox-Shock-027-00-007/dp/B001F212OK (which of course is cheaper without the Vic logo), or maybe something from a local H-D dealer, that sort of thing.

Me, I have one of those in my saddlebag, but the XCTs have storage space for all sorts of things.
I can see where that could be an issue with too powerful of an air compressor. Even my bicycle pump adds about 10 psi with a single stroke of the pump! Also, the simple act of measuring the pressure with the tire gauge lets a little air out until I get it seated quickly and properly. I found the gauge I have would let out about 2 psi with each repetition of measurement. Maybe my gauge sucks or my technique is to blame. Either way, my shock seems to be holding air.
 

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How is it the pipes don't get in the way? Does the swingarm and rear wheel drop down that much when the bike is jacked up on a lift? Looking at it on the ground, the axle bolt is directly in line with the pipes on both sides.
Look at your manual. You jack it up (best to have something like my lift block so the bike won't rock - click the link for info) I place a floor jack under the tire to take some weight off and pull the 2 bolts attaching suspension links, then lower the floor jack. Axle slides right out easy peasy - almost. Note the orientation and location of the spacers and replace accordingly.
 

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if you want to drop the wheel and pull it.
First unbolt the link rob at the bottom.
loosen axle nut and push axle through and take lock plate out.
Then jack bike up
 

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I can see where that could be an issue with too powerful of an air compressor. Even my bicycle pump adds about 10 psi with a single stroke of the pump! Also, the simple act of measuring the pressure with the tire gauge lets a little air out until I get it seated quickly and properly. I found the gauge I have would let out about 2 psi with each repetition of measurement. Maybe my gauge sucks or my technique is to blame. Either way, my shock seems to be holding air.
Your technique's fine. I pump it up about 3psi over what I want, if I'm about to check it with a separate gauge. I did that with a digital gauge a few times, to verify the accuracy of the Fox pump. But after seeing that the dial was spot on, I just pump about what I want, and try to unscrew the pump quickly.
 
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