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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Anyone have a good idea on how to measure the deflection in the belt. really cant get anything under there like a ruler. I know it is a silly question but.....
Jim
 

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I use a tape measure, one that locks the tape. I set the base of the tape measure on the ground and the tape pointing up and extended 6 or 8 inches. I have a mark on my swing arm that is about the center between the pulleys so that I consistently measure from the same place. I note where the belt is on the tape and then I use my belt tool to push on the belt until the correct pounds of pressure. The deflection is the location on the tape with the belt at rest versus where the belt is on the tape with the correct pressure from the tool. Does that make sense?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I use a tape measure, one that locks the tape. I set the base of the tape measure on the ground and the tape pointing up and extended 6 or 8 inches. I have a mark on my swing arm that is about the center between the pulleys so that I consistently measure from the same place. I note where the belt is on the tape and then I use my belt tool to push on the belt until the correct pounds of pressure. The deflection is the location on the tape with the belt at rest versus where the belt is on the tape with the correct pressure from the tool. Does that make sense?
yup makes a lot of sense :)
Ya know i just thought of that. I have tapes all over the place. :)
 

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Boy I hate to ask, but where and what would a belt tool look like and a guy find one. I'm thinking its sort of a fish scale looking device.. There has to be a better way.
 

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I use my index finger and my better judgement.
Never fails, always handy (LOL) and costs nothing.
 

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You must rotate the wheel and find the spot the belt is the tightest and measure the deflection at that point . If you don't , your belt will be way too tight when set . I start with the valve stem at 6 oclock , then 9 , 12 , 3 and measure deflection . Then I set the wheel at the tightest point and adjust .
 

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guess I need to read up on this operation. Been riding a shaft drive bike the last 5 years or so. Kinda forgot I adjusted the Kawasaki.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
guess I need to read up on this operation. Been riding a shaft drive bike the last 5 years or so. Kinda forgot I adjusted the Kawasaki.
Yea I have a direct drive Honda.. Forgot about this stuff
 

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with the rear wheel off the ground and rotating the wheel. How does the belt tighten up.
Never understood that part. But it does
 

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with the rear wheel off the ground and rotating the wheel. How does the belt tighten up.
Never understood that part. But it does
It's like your old drive chain in bikes that have chains, they tend to stretch a little over time and the stretching is not uniform.
One section remains tighter than the rest.
So as not to overtighten, it's advised to set a chain or belt with its tightest point as reference.
The belt doesn't tighten up VJ, it gets slacker after initial break-in.
 

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VJ - the sprockets aren't perfectly centered on axis, so there are tighter/looser spots in rotation - since the front & rear arent same size, it could take a couple rotations to find tightest spot.
 

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Yes, by all means this must be done using the utmost science. I tighten, go for a ride, if it squeaks I tighten a smidge and have a beer and try again. Then I stand back a bit and eye ball it real serious like and make sure everything is kinda straight. As the belt breaks in you have to tighten it a couple more times to stop the squeak till its done stretching. When you change out a rear tire if done properly you never have to adjust the belt.

If you don't use a scientific method of some sort surely your belt will not last. I use SWAG and although it does not require a special tool it still a science of sorts. I think, maybe, kinda, sorta.. oh well it works for me so far.
 

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Dang Joseph! I can't believe you left out the most important scientific part of adjust a drive belt!!!

You have to hold your tongue just right or it will never be right!!

There. Now everyone knows how to do it the right way.

Um, er, ahem... is there an established right way yet? Eyeball and feel seems to work best for those who have it down.
 

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Dang Joseph! I can't believe you left out the most important scientific part of adjust a drive belt!!!

You have to hold your tongue just right or it will never be right!!

There. Now everyone knows how to do it the right way.

Um, er, ahem... is there an established right way yet? Eyeball and feel seems to work best for those who have it down.


Ok I assumed all us old Dogs knew the tongue must be held just right. If for nothing else to avoid from smashing ones finger or thumb in the process. My bad my very very bad for leaving that out.
 

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I just eyeball it and feel it. When I double check it with a tape measure it's within normal limits.
Ok I assumed all us old Dogs knew the tongue must be held just right. If for nothing else to avoid from smashing ones finger or thumb in the process. My bad my very very bad for leaving that out.
I must be an old Dog as well (and I am,:wink Bob, wanna meet for lunch in Kingman sometime? Email me) because I just grab the belt and feel it up.
 

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VJ - the sprockets aren't perfectly centered on axis, so there are tighter/looser spots in rotation - since the front & rear arent same size, it could take a couple rotations to find tightest spot.
what there not. Holy crap
 
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