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So I assume that you are also "starting to have second thoughts about" Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler since they all also have manufacturing plants in Mexico as well?

Polaris move some of their ATV opreations to Mexico. Victory is staying in the US...for now. The more people who want to stop supporting an American business because they move some of their jobs then the less American business' there will be.
 

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I was wanting to buy a new Victory. Had Harley s Kawasaki, Suzuki. Just do not like Mexican Labor. Japan has their standard of living like ours. Their pay scale is similar to Germany and US. Mexico is like China. I look at pay scale Company profits and how the companies treat employees. I do not have to buy nothing and , yes we will eventual starve. I just think this is totally wrong if you want to promote US bike or North American bike. Just a subject I think about everyday before I buy any thing any more.

Not trying to start an argument just stating my opinion;)

The OP article was from 2010 and yes that was the plan. Due to Victory's success, they have currently decided to keep the Wisconsin plant open. Even if they did move the Engines to Mexico, the Victory line would still have more U.S. content than any other current production bike available today.

Like it or not, we now have a Global economy. I am less worried about stuff going to Mexico than I am for the volume of work going to China:crzy:
 

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Victory is not and will not be build outside of the US. The Mexico plant is for ATV/UTV production of vehicles that are not intended to be sold in the US. These vehicles supply requirements for the rest of the world not unlike HD's plant in India.

To be honest your comment about Mexican labor is very close minded. It does take some work out of the states but there are many more jobs within the US that are accomplished with Mexican labor than outside the US. This same logic applies with most other major nationalities. Take a walk through any mall, hardware store or department store to see how many items are made in the US from materials that are made in the US. You will be hard pressed to find many items that fit this criteria. Now walk through your house and you'll see how many items that aren't made in the US from materials that are made in the US. After all that ask yourself which of those items you can live without.

Please don't be offended by this response. My intention is to point out the fact that most of the item American rely on for comfort, conveinence and survival would not exist if it weren't for production outside of the US.
 

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I was wanting to buy a new Victory. Had Harley s Kawasaki, Suzuki. Just do not like Mexican Labor. Japan has their standard of living like ours. Their pay scale is similar to Germany and US. Mexico is like China. I look at pay scale Company profits and how the companies treat employees. I do not have to buy nothing and , yes we will eventual starve. I just think this is totally wrong if you want to promote US bike or North American bike. Just a subject I think about everyday before I buy any thing any more.
They did a Nightline report, where economists stated that if we spend like 70 cents a day on american made goods, we would create something like 50,000 new usa jobs. As correctly stated it is a personal choice, but I feel it is a grass rooys thing-company's and politicans are lining thier own pockets
 

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Also I think it is a shame that a company like harely davidson, that trumpets thier american roots and really was saved by american people dumb enough to support the co. when japanese made bikes were kicking a\thier ass--makes all thier gear (jackets, gloves, T shirts) in China (thats right humann rights hellhole china) and charges 2 times as much as gear made in USA
 

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I was wanting to buy a new Victory. Had Harley s Kawasaki, Suzuki. Just do not like Mexican Labor. Japan has their standard of living like ours. Their pay scale is similar to Germany and US. Mexico is like China. I look at pay scale Company profits and how the companies treat employees. I do not have to buy nothing and , yes we will eventual starve. I just think this is totally wrong if you want to promote US bike or North American bike. Just a subject I think about everyday before I buy any thing any more.
You are an extremely confused person. Maybe if you actually knew the facts about the subject that is being discussed it would help you not come across as a complete fool...but I doubt it.

BTW, to answer you original question this has been discussed and discounted at least 3 times before. Here are some previous threads you might want to read.

Is Victory moving to Mexico?
Who makes the Freedom engine?
And the winner is...
 

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Probably 8-10 months ago or so, Victory had a a Facebook post stating that they were hiring at one of their locations in the US (can't remember which one), and tons of people commented back with complaints of the low ($12.00 or so) per hour minimum starting pay. It's no wonder companies are moving to other countries. We want $30 and hour to do a simple job that takes no college degree, experience, and very little training. Plus we want breaks every 2 hours, 401k matching, insurance, pensions, raises, bonuses, paid vacations, paid sick days, paid holidays, etc. Folks in other countries are just happy to be able to eat and stay alive for the same work. We have ourselves to blame for companies moving away. As workers, we want gobs of money, and as consumers we want everything dirt cheap, and don't care where it's made. Go to walmart and see how much USA stuff you can find...it's shocking! Doesn't matter that it's made in china, as long as it's a rollback!

Just throwing my thoughts in the mix. Sorry for any offense it may cause anyone.

cheers
 

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After reading posts like Gibson's and all that Occutard falderall, it's refreshing to know there are still those who have their heads screwed on straight and are well informed. I thank the likes of ammo, goatlocker, LazyDawg, et al for their comments and hope what they wrote pried open some heretofore closed eyes.
 

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Folks in other countries are just happy to be able to eat and stay alive for the same work. We have ourselves to blame for companies moving away.
So that is your solution? Turn America into a banana republic where the working class are slaves to the ownership class?

Somehow I get the impression that if a company is paying its executive officers millions of dollars a year to dream up such genius ideas as adding ape hangers to a Cross Roads and painting it black, then they can probably afford to pay the workers actually creating the company's wealth enough to buy a can a Fancy Feast once or twice a week.

A race to the bottom isn't likely in the financial interest of anyone participating on our forum.
 

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I agree that as a general rule it is best to try to buy items made in USA. I read some articles about auto manufacturing and it was eye opening. We really do have a global economy now, like it or not.

Ford: "The F-Series pickup truck, that most iconic of domestic vehicles, is assembled in Kansas City, Missouri, and Dearborn, Michigan, but with just 55 percent of parts made in the U.S. or Canada." "Ford’s Fusion, Fiesta, and Lincoln MKZ models are built in Mexico, while the Edge, Flex, Lincoln MKX, and Lincoln MKT are built in Canada."

GM: "...vehicles assembled in Canada include Chevrolet's Camaro, Equinox and Impala and the GMC Terrain, while vehicles built in Mexico include Cadillac's SRX and Escalade EXT, Chevrolet's Aveo, HHR, Silverado, and GMC's Sierra. GM vehicles built in the U.S. include Buick's LaCrosse, Lucerne and Enclave, Cadillac's CTS, DTS and STS-V, Chevrolet's Cruze, Corvette, Malibu and Tahoe, and GMC's Yukon."

Chrysler: "Chrysler says about 61 percent of the components it uses for its Chrysler, Dodge and Jeep lines come from the U.S., while about 20 percent come from Mexico and Latin America, about 10 percent from Canada and just under 10 percent from the rest of the world. It maintains large production facilities across the U.S., but also builds its 300 and Dodge Challenger and Charger, in Canada, and the PT Cruiser in Mexico."
Others: "Toyota, Honda, Hyundai and Kia all proudly trumpet their domestic-built credentials... more Honda vehicles are now built in the U.S. than in Japan. Toyota builds its Camry and Avalon models in Georgetown, Kentucky, its Sienna and Highlander in Princeton, Indiana, and has large plants in Huntsville, Alabama, and San Antonio, Texas. Hyundai builds the Sonata and Elantra in Montgomery, Alabama, and shares a plant in West Point, Georgia, with Kia..."
:crzy:
 

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Japanese companies brought their suppliers here and they set up offices and some production. Waa Laa domestic content.

This "but they are built here" hide behind is such a crock. You're supporting a foreign car maker. Period.

I bought a new 2007 Ford Ranger because of the high (real) domestic content. Now production on those has ended.
 

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So that is your solution? Turn America into a banana republic where the working class are slaves to the ownership class?

Somehow I get the impression that if a company is paying its executive officers millions of dollars a year to dream up such genius ideas as adding ape hangers to a Cross Roads and painting it black, then they can probably afford to pay the workers actually creating the company's wealth enough to buy a can a Fancy Feast once or twice a week.

A race to the bottom isn't likely in the financial interest of anyone participating on our forum.
Customers are what creates a manufacturing company's wealth.
 

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My supervisor has family he visits in Michigan. I had recently bought a Chevy Cruze and he told me that he saw a sign on a trip up there that said "Home of the Chevy Cruze". I felt pretty good that I was helping to support the American worker and our economy.

Then I saw this website from ABC news that has all the vehicles along with what percentage is "Made in America" I was kinda shocked that the Cruze is listed at only 45% :eek:

Then I looked at other Chevy models and the highest is the Express at 80%. And the lowest...belive it or not...the car of choice for many police and other government vehicles across the country...the Chevy Caprice is a whopping 5% American made :( However, the other big police cruiser, the Ford Crown Vic, is 75%.

Now for a little more "reality check"; from CBS News Report Made in USA: 5 Great American Cars Made Here The Top American Made Cars #1 and #2 respectively are the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord both at 80%

Just goes to show you can't always judge a book by its cover.
 

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Customers are what creates a manufacturing company's wealth.
That is incorrect.

You have to understand how money comes into being in our economy. All this business about an overworked printing press is a lot of political hooey. By fiat, the gov't allows banks to lend more money than they have on hand. There are other ways of increasing our country's money supply, but let's stick with that big one.

When a good is created (particularly a high dollar, complex good), banks have the task of loaning money to people likely to pay it back. When the bank loans $10, but only has $1 in reserves, $9 are newly introduced into the economy. And there is an asset to back that newly created money. This is what I mean by the creation of "wealth." More money, more goods = better standard of living.

This is different than service transactions. If I give you $5 to cut my hair, I have transferred $5 to you, but no wealth has been created. There is no collateral.

The point here being that it is the creation of the good that creates the wealth. The bank will not likely loan me much if any money for something that has no value (like my new haircut).

This is the fallacy of a service economy. If a country has no wealth (goods) creating jobs and simply transfers money between service workers, it will eventually go broke as the service workers will end up sending all their money abroad for all their needs and desires and won't be able to pay back the bankers. Sound familiar?

I was speaking with a supplier of our's last week. He has a factory in China, but almost none of the product built there comes back to the US anymore, because between the increase in the Chinese worker's salaries and the cost of shipping, it's actually cheaper for them to make US purchased product domestically once again. Amen.
 

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Now for a little more "reality check"; from CBS News Report Made in USA: 5 Great American Cars Made Here The Top American Made Cars #1 and #2 respectively are the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord both at 80%
I think the "made in" statistics may be a little misleading. Keep in mind, that before the cars are "made," they are proposed, designed, engineered, planned, and tested somewhere. Just because a Japanese car plant may assemble as many American body panels as an American car plant does, does not necessarily mean that it has the same level of American "content" in its creation.
 

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Yeah, you want to buy American to support the country. My point is that the jobs you want to support, more than just the company, are being farmed out to other countries. So sure, you are supporting an American company, but a lot of the jobs that went into bringing that vehicle together are outsourced to another country.
I agree it's still better than buying from non-American sources, but it isn't the same as it used to be. cheers
 
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