Victory Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Today was one beautiful day; I think we hit a record high of 70 degrees. Not too shabby for the middle of Kansas in January!

So I took a day off from work and set about to replacing the rubber foot pegs for the shift and brake levers. I've ridden "heavy" Harleys for years and one of the things I wanted on my Cross Country was a proper brake pedal. So a good friend of mine gave me a brake lever off a late-model Harley and I cut the end of it off. I rounded and dressed the cut-off edge, drilled a hole, and bolted it to the brake lever. I think it came out mighty fine. Of course, I had to go with a matching shifter peg. These are from the Harley "streamliner" collection, courtesy of eBay. The chrome master cylinder cap is from Kuryakyn and screws right on.





 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,947 Posts
They look great! Thanks for sharing. thumb up
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,061 Posts
Looks great! You know Victory has a plastic chrome piece for the rear master cylinder for around $30 that looks much better than the bare master cylinder. It would match up beautifully with your chrome reservoir cap.

I was a little disappointed that it's plastic but since it doesn't really take much punishment; I guess it's okay.

Anyone know how they chrome plastic? I've never seen anything being chromed so I'm picturing a hot solution of chrome the piece is dipped into. If that's so then wouldn't the plastic melt or warp? Maybe it's a different kind of chrome that's not hot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, Bob. About the master cylinder cover, I refuse to pay $30 plus tax for a piece of chrome-plated plastic that probably costs Victory a couple of bucks. Besides, the rear master cylinder doesn't bother me all the match; I don't even pay attention to it.

To electroplate plastic, an electrically conductive layer must first be deposited, which adheres well to both the plastic substrate, or material to be plated, and the desired plating material, usually chrome. A variety of solutions are used to etch the surface of the plastic, which allows it to adhere well to the conductive metallic layer. A thick layer of copper is typically used on the plastic, because its flexibility allows for the difference in thermal expansion between the plastic component, and metal plating.

Then, because electrically-conductive layers have been deposited on the substrate, conventional electroplating methods can be used. Next comes a thick layer, sometimes two, of nickel to prevent corrosion of the copper. The substrate is then ready for the final application of chrome electroplating.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,061 Posts
Thanks for the info John. That's why I like the forums so much. So much to learn. :)

I finished the bars, gauges, HD grips from SAC, garage door opener, iPod wiring, mirrors, windshield, and Kicker speakers so I'm done with that area of the bike for now. I like the idea of being able to use any HD grips I want. These are the cruise control SAC grips I had on my Harley but since the XC already has electronic cruise control; the grip control will just be a back up.



Although the pic is kinda blurry; you can see where I hogged out the outer part of the perch housing at the bottom to use any HD grips and ground out the stud at the top that goes into a hole in the bars. By removing the stud; I can put the perch wherever I want and at any position I want. I can also use any 1" bars now as well. I don't have to go through the small number of Vic bar makers of today.

 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top