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I've always wondered if there were layman's motorcycle repair courses available. Everywhere I checked I always find college courses that lead to a professional motorcycle mechanic degree but nothing for the do-it-yourself'er who would like to know a bit more. If anyone has any info I would like to hear from you. Thanks.
 

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If you have a friend - I mean a real friend - who is a good wrench spinner, have him come over and show you how to do maintenance tasks. The best teacher has you do it while they describe to you what to do and how to do it. That way, you get your synapses wired better.
I have done that for others and, like many others on this forum, have passed how to wisdom on those who asked for help. Hint, hint.
 

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I just looked it up and they have some automotive classes in your area, if you take some automotive classes for cars, then the motorcycle comes natural ... It is good you want to do this ... It is fun

Youth Automotive Training Center

399 SW 3rd Ave, Deerfield Beach, FL 33441, USA
+1 9544280909

https://g.co/kgs/z4icjk

Andre using TaPaTaLk
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for your reply's. Ritz I don't have a "real" friend who is a wrench. Have you ever passed on your knowledge to any Victory owners located along the Central West Coast Of Florida? I'm thinking if there is anyone you know, we advertise on the forum a seminar of sorts for folks interested in learning more mechanical information about their Victory bikes. Who knows how much interest that might instigate? I think that the individual who teaches should be compensated for their time. I would leave that up to whoever does the program. I don't know if this has been ever discussed on this forum before. If there are others who have done this before, please feel free to chime in.

For those on the forum who are professionals in motorcycle mechanics, I mean no harm. This would a class that would tech us non-professionals basic emergency repair techniques to help us when were broke down along side of the road.
 

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JJKJR, I did tutor a couple, who are good friends in Phoenix, as to the how to of maintaining their Victorys. Also helped them with installing accessories and such. They put the wife and I up and fed us. We'll do the same for you - just fly us out there when the temps are no higher than 75 and no hurricanes are expected. We eat anything but oysters. :)
 

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Thanks for your reply's. Ritz I don't have a "real" friend who is a wrench. Have you ever passed on your knowledge to any Victory owners located along the Central West Coast Of Florida? I'm thinking if there is anyone you know, we advertise on the forum a seminar of sorts for folks interested in learning more mechanical information about their Victory bikes. Who knows how much interest that might instigate? I think that the individual who teaches should be compensated for their time. I would leave that up to whoever does the program. I don't know if this has been ever discussed on this forum before. If there are others who have done this before, please feel free to chime in.

For those on the forum who are professionals in motorcycle mechanics, I mean no harm. This would a class that would tech us non-professionals basic emergency repair techniques to help us when were broke down along side of the road.
Shoot me a PM when you get a notion. I am across SR 64 from you about an hour and half. Maybe we can get together and figure out what you would like to learn and figure out. Then go get a bite to eat or something. Do you have some tools to work with?
 

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During he winter months (mid-Oct through April) I am roughly 2 hrs NNE of you in The Villages, FL. I am no expert on the Victory bikes in general but I've done some work on our XCT bikes including: installation of new air filter, PCV, Lloyd's timing wheel, 1/4 turn throttle ring, +2" extended handlebars, lots of chrome geegaws and gadgets; removal and replacement of both wheels for tire changes; belt adjustment; oil/filter changes; saber tooth lights; and probably some more that I can't remember. I am a pretty darn good amateur wrencher on Honda VTX bikes so that give me the confidence to tackle most bike work. Like JJKJR, I would be happy to try to help but give us a list of what you want done or want to learn how to do to get things started.
 

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You can just about get a degree in anything at your own pace with the information available on the internet.
I learned how to do leather work this way. The videos were the key but in the end it took trial and error using my hands to develop new skills.

Had I a mentor or class I could go to I think I would have gotten much better at it. I've all but retired from it now though. I just do personal stuff as needed.

I've found all skills dovetail into other skills; especially those involving hands on work. For instance the skills I learned as a Navy Corpsman stitching up wounds dovetailed into the leatherwork involving using hand tools. Using the leather stitching machine dovetailed into my skills using machines in a machine shop.

The most valuable skills I ever learned was as an apprentice machinist. So many of those skills have come in handy and used on a daily basis while doing so many things in the garage. Using a belt sander dovetailed into the leatherwork as well.
 

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I've been a tinkerer my entire life. From before I was 10 years old, I had my own tools or borrowed my dad's. My parents dreaded buying toys for me because within 2 weeks, they were apart; I just had to see what made them go. I have no formal mechanical training (except for the sewing machines my wife sells; I'm her service technician).

My Vic has been to a dealer exactly 2 times:
- When it was delivered new
- For 500 mile service

It has almost 47,000 miles as of this post.

Everything else was done by me (with the exception of mounting tires, but I took the wheels off myself). I did mount the first set of tires for the experience and I may try it again with the next set. Even did my own cams. @PaiN stopped by and we actually helped each other with cams. Took about 4 hours per bike.
 

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I've been a tinkerer my entire life. From before I was 10 years old, I had my own tools or borrowed my dad's. My parents dreaded buying toys for me because within 2 weeks, they were apart; I just had to see what made them go. I have no formal mechanical training (except for the sewing machines my wife sells; I'm her service technician).

My Vic has been to a dealer exactly 2 times:
- When it was delivered new
- For 500 mile service

It has almost 47,000 miles as of this post.

Everything else was done by me (with the exception of mounting tires, but I took the wheels off myself). I did mount the first set of tires for the experience and I may try it again with the next set. Even did my own cams. @PaiN stopped by and we actually helped each other with cams. Took about 4 hours per bike.
I suppose I'll be "stopping by" to do your wheel bearings soon....??? :wink
 

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When I bought my vision the second day I had it the headlight went out. So with no manual or even no forum help cause nobody new what to do. I dove in and with in 5 minutes I was off to buy metric tools. Yup didn't have any. I learned as I went a long. Your phone can take great photos don't get to close but take photos you can understand later. Bag all your screws and label the bags. Keep in mind you can do anything you want. Youtube has some good videos even if there not a Vic you'll get the idea.
There is a guy down your way that is one of the top Vic tuners and mechanics. Hes called Kevinx go see him and ask him how you can learn. Most important is buy a shop manual. When you read threw it keep in mind they leave out words cause they think you have gone to school and should know it. Whatever you do try to look ahead at the hole job and if you need a second hand don't be afraid to ask wife or girlfriend.
we're here for you
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for all your kind reply's. I don't particularly have anything at this time that I need to learn to do, nor is there anything wrong currently with my bike. I have all the performance upgrades that I care to have along with my share of aftermarket accessories. It's a complete bike that gives me a lot fun hours in the saddle.

I got this idea for this thread from talking to a Harley guy at a biker bar who told me that his Harley Dealer would intermittently give short courses to the lay public on a variety of topics. He told me about a few courses like; changing a battery, doing an oil change, lubing cables, etc. He said there seemed to be a lot of interest and it always concluded with hot dogs and beer. I guess that's the best part. After hearing that, I thought that maybe other Victory Riders would enjoy learning as well.

When I contacted the forum my thought was to find out if there was any person associated with Victory Motorcycles that was teaching simple maintenance things to lay mechanics/do-it-yourself er's. A few years ago I contacted Polaris Corporate and their response was to offer me a tour of the manufacturing plant, that is, when Victory was still in production. My local Victory Dealer is 45 miles away. Although they still service Victory's, the didn't pick up the Indian line, so I'm uncertain as how much interest they would have to host Victory Courses. When I finish this post, I'll send them an e-mail.

My mechanic is Kevin Cross in High Springs and 2-3 years ago I talked with him about hosting such a course but this is one very busy man going around the country doing mobile performance enhancements. So I truly understand his inability to take on anymore responsibility.

I will keep this thread for future reference. Maybe at some point I can get together with those individuals who offered their time to teach. JJKJR.
 

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Download the service manual and give it a good read and don't be afraid to tackle something on your own. I took apart a 1973 enduro motorcycle to the frame and put it all back together including re-wiring all the electrical. Didn't know much about 2-strokes at the time but after lots of reading, visiting forums, and screwing up a few times (well more than a few), that old bike is tagged, insured, and on the road! When I first posted my project on here a few years back most gave me a hard time over tackling a rust bucket project but I persisted and glad I did.
 

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I came from the Honda VTX forum world with "tech sessions". Some kind people open up their garage to host and people come to work on projects they don't feel comfortable tackling by themselves. Some old pro wrenches but lot of amateurs. The whole point is learning and passing that on to others.
It's how I met Mr Vinish few years ago. :)
Not much work to do these days and many have moved to other bikes. I was in Michigan helping change a Goldwing shock spring in August and just went to another session in Ohio last weekend.

Any bike is pretty dang easy to work on. Just take your time and use a manual. Remember it's a toy and there is nothing wrong with taking multiple days to get something done since you should have other transportation.
My bike was up on jack over a week while I waited for parts to be delivered. :(

Torque wrench is an essential tool and 6 point sockets. Both can be purchased for low cost at harbor freight. Just dive in and you'll be fine. :)
 

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Download the service manual and give it a good read and don't be afraid to tackle something on your own. I took apart a 1973 enduro motorcycle to the frame and put it all back together including re-wiring all the electrical. Didn't know much about 2-strokes at the time but after lots of reading, visiting forums, and screwing up a few times (well more than a few), that old bike is tagged, insured, and on the road! When I first posted my project on here a few years back most gave me a hard time over tackling a rust bucket project but I persisted and glad I did.
Those rust buckets are the best learning experience possible. There's no replacement for actually doing the work and getting your hands dirty while learning the technical stuff. That's where the rubber meets the road in education.
 

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When I bought my vision the second day I had it the headlight went out. So with no manual or even no forum help cause nobody new what to do. I dove in and with in 5 minutes I was off to buy metric tools. Yup didn't have any. I learned as I went a long. Your phone can take great photos don't get to close but take photos you can understand later. Bag all your screws and label the bags. Keep in mind you can do anything you want. Youtube has some good videos even if there not a Vic you'll get the idea.
There is a guy down your way that is one of the top Vic tuners and mechanics. Hes called Kevinx go see him and ask him how you can learn. Most important is buy a shop manual. When you read threw it keep in mind they leave out words cause they think you have gone to school and should know it. Whatever you do try to look ahead at the hole job and if you need a second hand don't be afraid to ask wife or girlfriend.
we're here for you
The photo thing is important for many reasons. You can look at it later to see what it looked like before you took it apart and after if you're thorough. Taking pictures close up is okay as long as you have at least two other photos further back at different distances that allow you to see what it is the close up is all about.

Folks sometimes forget others don't have that recent memory of what they were just looking at in their heads.

Good point VJ.
 

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Another tip for those that like to experiment with photos. Instead of putting your phone (or camera) closer for detail, try moving back some and zooming in a bit. If your camera is too close, sometimes you can’t achieve focus. Taking a step back and zooming in could give much better results. Feel free to play around and see what works better for you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
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