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I just read Clement Salvadori's article in Rider magazine, about motorcycle addiction. He told of over sixty years of being addicted to motorcycles and motorcycling. He repeatedly gave up other parts of his life to go back to motorcycling. It made me think about having it in your blood. Then I came across this old picture. (I hope I can upload it somehow from my iPad -- it's all I have with me right now, 800 miles from home). It's my Aunt Else, probably about 1950, in West Germany. Her husband, my Uncle Joe (Josef Hochmann) rode. Maybe I had motorcycling in my blood before i ever knew it.

I've been riding since 1977. Most of that time, I didn't have a car. My older son (now 24) rides, but it didn't catch on with my daughter nor my younger son.

How about you? How long have you been riding? Has it been an important part of your life, or just something you happen to do on a weekend now and then? Did anyone in your family ride and pass it down to you?
 

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Yes, I had a Uncle that rode. He got me interested in the mid 60's. I have had a motorcycle off and on since my mid teens. I have riding continuously for the last 15 years. I have had a motorcycle license for over 47 years.
 

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My uncle rode and my Dad a little in New Zealand in their Uni days, but they never told us much or encouraged us offspring.
I only took it up recently in my 50's, but wish I'd found the culture and friendship earlier

I like this short film about a kiwi boy experiencing just this feeling in Canada
https://www.yahoo.com/news/15-minute-harley-commercial-want-221221168.html
 

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I only took it up recently in my 50's, but wish I'd found the culture and friendship earlier
Same here - it was barely on my radar screen before then but since discovering it's been like a rebirth - new life. The culture and friendship and the THRILL! I vividly remember the dry-mouthed, white knuckled, first time I got on the highway and was clipping 60 whole miles per hour on an 800 Suzuki thinking this is so wrong LOL. But I've been totally hooked every since. Why did I wait so long....
 

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Got my drivers' license and my first motorcycle in 1952, a Simplex Servi-Cycle, a bike not unlike Aunt Else's, but a lot wheezier with a less than 200cc 2 stroke, suicide clutch and belt drive. A stint in college / Navy / college and I was back on 2 wheels in 1961 with a Honda Dream 300. From then on, there were 1 to 6 motorcycles in my garage at any one time. My XR is so good at doing it all, that its my only bike. For now.
 

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My dad, grandpa, and uncle all rode. Uncle still does; he's the only one left sucking air and actually inherited Grandpa's GL1500. When I was a little guy, about from the age of 5, my dad would plunk me on the back of his CB750 (and later a GL1000) and we'd ride all over the San Diego area.

After my mom moved us to Idaho with my step dad, there wasn't much opportunity for that. I would be into my 20s before I got on a bike again.
 

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I'm surprised there has not been more replies to this thread. Most everyone I ride with and associate with these days rides. We all started out in or teens on some little motorcycle. Many gave it up for a number of years doing the kids thang. But came back to it when the kids were older or gone. I have one friend that made it to Sturgis for 23 consecutive years. Another that has ridden and had a motorcycle for 62 years. He turns 79 this month and still riding. He does 4 or 5 trips a year. Yeah we talk about the old days, what medications we are on. Drink beer, pass around a bottle every now and then and we still ride. Not like we use to, but we do. We still get together and have a barbeque pretty often. Hang around a old independent bike shop. A 46 Knuckle head and 42 Flat head setting in the shop. They both run. We are all pretty much teen agers at the shop. But in reality we are grand parents and great grand parents. Our first love was motorsycals. We'll keep riding as long as we can and should probably quit long before we do.
 

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I was the first in my family ever to ride a motorcycle..... They didn't like it... But I still did... Still do.... Victory rules....

Andre using TaPaTaLk
 

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Always had scooters and stuff but didn't have a motorcyle until late 2011. Always wanted one so in 2011 I bought a Honda shadow 750, rode it for about a year until I saw the below picture of Victory Vegas. I knew I had to have one so I bought my first Vegas. It wasn't black but it was beautiful. I turned heads whereever I went, but unfortunatelly I crashed it. Almost four years later I got mysefl another Vegas. But this time it's black. :D
 

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My dad taught me as a kid...Got my own street bike in 65 @ 16...

Just after being born, when my mother & I were released from the hospital, my dad picked us up in a Goulding sidecar attached to a 1936 HD /EL. My mother was not pleased !!....I don't remember :smile.

Doubt a hospital would allow that today......
 

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First rode mini bikes then 12 or 13, had a ride on a proper dirt bike a year or so later, mum n dad weren't keen but that never stopped me.
Bought an early Yammy MX bike AT2 125 2-stroke around 17 was purely a dirt weapon, lotsa fun, had a nice pipe on it and knobby tyres.
Around that time or a bit later my dad sourced me a little Honda C50 step-thru scooter from a bloke he worked with.
Possibly thought I'd be safe on a low powered machine.
I'd been reading Two Wheels magazine and touring stories captivated me.
Within a short time of riding the C50 locally.
I strapped a tarp to the back and a bag with a can opener and plastic implements and such and off I went.
Rode south through the Royal National Park a favourite haunt of motorcyclists.
In my mind I was Agostini riding an MV Augusta or a Honda CB750/4 through the winding bends.
Dropping down the Stanwell Park Hill the little Honda went off the speedo!
From there I threaded my way further south along the picturesque south coast road.
The sea to my left the mountains to my right.
Down through the steel city of Wollongong I rode, intrepidly pushing Hondas marvel of four stroke engineering to its limits and beyond.
I was really alive!
Touring!
The world awaited only a right hand twistgrip away!
To be continued.......
Gotta ring the dyno:smile
 

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Grrrrrrrr!..... Some selfish flu ridden customer gave my mate Steve the Dynoman the fkn flu!!
So no dyno today, he's gone home...... But....
He may be ok tomoz..... Let's hope so....
And he's gonna run it up on kevinx fat tune first to see the numbers, then tailor some fuel out of it in places I guess cos it's a rorty beast down low at the moment, just wants to GO!

Ok back to the distant past, my youthful touring exploits on my imaginary 750/4 (actually a C50 Honda)
Through Wollongong steelworks city then back into fresh air. Sea breezes and the smell if a hard ridden 50 cc four stroke.....let's google that in cubes hey!
3.051 cubes..... Yet another coincidence! My V8 Ford is 351 cubes....
My Bored out Vegas is 37.5 times bigger than my poor mercilessly thrashed Honda step thru was.
Note the word 'was'

Onwards southwards I pushed that little bike, wringing it's neck for every ounce of power I could coax from my 3 and a half cube engine!
Honda knew how to build a bike that's for sure!
Victory engineers bought a 750 Honda Shadow and a Harley Sportster, pulled them apart and scrutinised every part on those bikes and said
"how can we build better and cheaper, give the people a better machine for less money?"

Their quest was maybe more ambitious than my southerly ride!
Through Kiama I went having relished in throwing the little Honda through the famous Kiama bends along the seafront, the plastic legshields chafed from contact with the road as I explored the lean angles of the Honda and grip of years old Cheng Shin tyres.
At Gerringong beach I stopped, strung a cheap blue plastic poly tarp from a tree to the bike, yes bike, it has two wheels it's a bike, a motor bike.
I light a fire, extract my small frying pan, get the can opener out (remember them?) and open a can of baked beans, I'm eating in style, a baked dinner!
Heinz baked beans!
Washed down with a few ales from the Gerringong pub.
On awakening I'm frosty and cold.....I refresh the smouldering fire with paper and twigs blowing on in till it bursts back into life.... A few more twigs then find some sticks and I'm warming up.
Ahhh the life of the long distance tourer!

Little was I to know the thousands of miles and the adventures the trials and tribulations the people I'd meet on life's long and winding road as I kicked my beast into life, a cloud of smoke welcomed the day and as the machine warmed I strapped my trusty blue tarp to the back of the bike, donned my leather jacket helmet and gloves and started my intrepid journey back north, winding my way homewards on the same road.
The same but different as I travelled a different direction.
Funny that, my teacher at school said on my report that I marched to the beat of a different drum....
How right he was.

The poor Honda expired in Wollongong and I managed to get it on the train, for the return trip.
Post mortem revealed the spark plug had closed up!
Closed by the piston that had parted company with its conrod. That poor little lump of aluminium had been up and down that tiny bore how many times?
It was to go up and down no more.
I don't even remember now what became of my lifeless Honda, gone but not forgotten.
Resurrected for your entertainment.

Next bike was a real bike! A man's bike!
The venerable Japanese Triumph!
The vertical twin Yamaha XS 650!!!

The first of many......but that's another story, many many stories, rides, adventures, breakdowns and repairs.

The thunderous twin that shook and vibrated, rattled windows and terrified children and old ladies alike on startup via the trusty kick-starter (remember them?)

Ok I got work to do.....
 

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MBX, you should be writing for some MC magazine. No, really, I mean it. You spin a great yarn, as us old folks like to put it.
 

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My dad and uncles rode, pretty sure my one grandfather did too. I can remember being a little kid, maybe two or three years old and my old man setting me on the tank infront of him and putting up and down the alley at my grandmothers house. That's where it started for me.

I can only remember one or two times, my older brother tells me that everytime I heard that bike start up I got all happy and ran around like a fool looking for a ride on it. Growing up with my mom I had zero exposure to anything with two wheels after that.
 
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