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Discussion Starter #1
Well my wifes biggest fear is coming to life lol. My son called and said he is interested in getting a bike. The dilemma is he has ridden very little. I had a 250cc bike before my Vegas and watching how out of control he looked on a small bike does have me a bit nervous to say the least. He wants a street bike and seems to want a cruiser. I am trying to get him to get a small cc bike to start with maybe a 650cc or 750cc but even that is big IMO to learn on. He does have the basics but needs to refine his skills. I told him to buy it outright and used so he can at least learn and sell it when he gets ready to move up in size. What do you guys think?
 

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Best way to learn to ride is to pick up a cheap dirt bike get the oldest heaviest one you can find and go have fun in the dirt for a while.
 

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Maybe an MSF Course will help? A Smaller bike is easier to learn on than larger bikes, that's for sure.. The larger the bike the longer the learning curve. More due to the weight of the things and balance than anything..

But. If he's even average height, and more responsible, a 750 cruiser is a really nice machine to learn on..

The thing is with 250 cruisers is that they are cramped and have no real power. And lack of power to get a person out of the way of situations on the road can be a bad thing.. Nothing worse than cranking on a throttle to avoid a thing and nothing really happens..

Sport-bikes are different. A 350 would be power enough for most, but cruisers - I don't think a 750 and a bunch of parking lot practice to get a feel for emergency braking, tight radius turning, and balance - before hitting downtown traffic at rush hour, is too much of a stretch for almost anyone..

If he is taller and heavier even a larger cruiser is not going to be too much for him to handle..

A 250 though? I personally wouldn't..

People tend to outgrow those machines very quickly. If you do start there, most would suggest that you buy used, learn on it, and resell it for little-to-no loss a few months later when you want to trade up.
 

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That is the only way to learn.
That's how I learned too.. First time on a bike, I looked at a bush, gave it some gas and parked it there :grin
 

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I'm with p.hunt.

My first bike was a 1981 Honda CB750C. Yea, a 750, but if you know me that is a small bike :) Stay away from crotch rockets, and the 650-750 cruisers would be just the ticket for starting out. That, and he won't outgrow it in a month.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I learned on an old yamaha 125cc bike back in the late 70's. You guy's are all pretty much supporting my thoughts. Thank you.
 

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Well my wifes biggest fear is coming to life lol. My son called and said he is interested in getting a bike. The dilemma is he has ridden very little. I had a 250cc bike before my Vegas and watching how out of control he looked on a small bike does have me a bit nervous to say the least. He wants a street bike and seems to want a cruiser. I am trying to get him to get a small cc bike to start with maybe a 650cc or 750cc but even that is big IMO to learn on. He does have the basics but needs to refine his skills. I told him to buy it outright and used so he can at least learn and sell it when he gets ready to move up in size. What do you guys think?
I took a Motorcycle Safety Course. The had us on 250 dirt bikes with real temperamental clutches. Right after passing the course I bought a 750 Honda Magna. I found it way easier to ride than a dirt bike. A 750 is large enough even for a bigger guy. If you get him on a small 600 cruiser he'll be cramped up and my guess is he'd be pretty unhappy on it.
 

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ditto ditto ditto...do it in the dirt!:grin
 

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After a 10 year break and coming from sportbikes, I bought my current bike and have loved every minute of it. I definitely recommend and MSF course though...then some seat time in his own bike and he should pick it up rather well as long as he's responsible about it.
 

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A motorcycle safety course is definitely the way to go...after a long break from riding a sport-tour bike. I took a safety course which was great, it reinforced things/ reactions that come naturally to me and pointed out old/ bad habits. Check out different courses some use larger bikes then 125's...I went to a HD dealer that use 600 Buell's.



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At 31 he should easily be able to handle a used 750 Shadow or 800 Vulcan. Low weight, maneuverable and easy to handle for a beginner. Lots of both around at good prices too. Starting in the dirt is a waste of time if he's heading for asphalt anyway. And no need to be a helicopter parent at that age. He just needs to stay off of the real busy roads for awhile and needs a mentor (dad) to follow and learn from. Let him ride for a month or two until he's somewhat comfortable then hand him off to the pro's for an MSF course. A year from now you'll have an important and trusted riding buddy to travel with.
 

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Find a good used bike for about $1500 or less. Take the motorcycle safety course and then just practice around the neighborhood. Then slowly branch out as comfort level is built. My gf 26 who has never been on a bike let alone ride one until she dated me now rides her own sportster 883 I got her for $1200. She knew nothing about riding a bike other than being a passenger. The safety course gave her the knowledge and then I helped her from there once she was licensed. So you could help him hone his skills after he takes the course.


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When I was initially looking, I had several people that I asked about it. I wanted a 250 to learn on. Every person that I spoke to said, no at least a 600. I ended up with a V-Star 650. It was enough for me to learn on. I started out in the neighborhood, then took the MSF course and in 6 months, after realizing that I needed more power, was ready to upgrade. For me, it was the right way to go. Big enough for me to be able to ride in the city, but small enough that I was intimidated by all the power. I would up selling the bike for more than I paid for it, went directly to somebody else that wanted to do the same thing, learn to ride.
 

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I started at the age of 31 as well. Granted I had been on ATVs for many years before hand. I got a Honda 600 shadow to start with. Pick it used with less than 1000 miles. Loaded it on a trailer in the snow. Tried to get into a class but never made it. Less than a month after getting the bike and the licenses left TN and went to Dayton bike week. Three weeks later it was traded in on a 100 CID Vegas. Got more on trade than I paid for it. Spend allot and I mean allot of time in my work parking lot getting the feel of it. Dropped it, laid it down, and crashed it loading it into a trailer. First trip on a road went with two of my friends 3 mountains and 200 miles later we headed south. I don't think that is a good way to start looking back LOL. Still wanting/needing to do a class for sure.
 

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At 31 he should easily be able to handle a used 750 Shadow or 800 Vulcan. Low weight, maneuverable and easy to handle for a beginner. Lots of both around at good prices too. Starting in the dirt is a waste of time if he's heading for asphalt anyway. And no need to be a helicopter parent at that age. He just needs to stay of the real busy roads for awhile and needs a mentor (dad) to follow and learn from. Let him ride for a month or two until he's somewhat comfortable then hand him off to the pro's for an MSF course. A year from now you'll have an important and trusted riding buddy to travel with.

I agree with this.

He is a grown man....


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Discussion Starter #20
I agree with this.

He is a grown man....


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I understand he is a grown man. He will most likely get a 750 or so if he ends up doing it. I just have to keep steering clear of buying new. He told me yesterday I just need to sell him my bike and get another one.
 
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