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Just bought a gently used 2013 Vegas 8-ball, now I'm learning to ride it. Signed up for the community college course to get my endorsement, and figured joining a Victory forum would be the next logical step. I have friends who ride but a forum of people who know my bike and can answer questions for it specifically will be a big help. Thankyou.

Jeffery.
 

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Just bought a gently used 2013 Vegas 8-ball, now I'm learning to ride it. Signed up for the community college course to get my endorsement, and figured joining a Victory forum would be the next logical step. I have friends who ride but a forum of people who know my bike and can answer questions for it specifically will be a big help. Thankyou.

Jeffery.
Hi Jeffrey... Welcome!

The vegas is a big bike for someone just getting started. It is not the bike I would suggest for a noob.

That said! I suggest you take it real easy and try to get a friend to take you under his wing while you learn.
 

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JEGood
Tell your insurance company you tuck the course to get a discount.
Don't take chances and never trust cars thinking they will see you
 

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Welcome aboard Jeffery. The Vegas is a nice ride, you'll enjoy it.

Not sure about the USA, but here in Ontario the basic motorcycle course (called an M1) supplies 125 or 250cc bikes for use during the program. These are great to learn the basics on.

Good advice above .... DTA .... Don't trust anybody out on the road, especially if they're on 4 wheels instead of 2.

Mike
 

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Most motorcycle safety courses are based on the work of guy who wrote this book. It's a great read. You can get a copy at your local library.

He also wrote another book aptly named More Proficient Motorcycling.
Just as good as this one. I liked both of them and learned a lot from each.
 

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Good luck, be careful, enjoy and don't wreck it....road rash hurts.....bad! The community college courses are great, you won't come out a pro but you should have the fundamentals down after the course. An old cheap dirt bike can go a long way for training and if you drop it no big deal. If you're like me you're Prolly proud of the new bike.
 

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Just bought a gently used 2013 Vegas 8-ball, now I'm learning to ride it. Signed up for the community college course to get my endorsement, and figured joining a Victory forum would be the next logical step. I have friends who ride but a forum of people who know my bike and can answer questions for it specifically will be a big help. Thankyou.

Jeffery.
My first bike was a 1977 Shovel-head (new). I had ridden other people's dirt bikes and my younger brother's water-buffalo. Back then; there was not so much traffic and less idiots too.

Be careful. Ride the back roads as much as possible to get the feel of the big bike. Remember; it has a big motor too. Learn to stop.

If you don't ride defensively; one of those damn cars will KILL YOU.
 

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Order a Ride Like A Pro DVD. Select one you think will help you best. Its $20 and the cheapest life insurance you can ever buy.
https://www.ridelikeapro.com/
Oh, and my safety tip of the day; Never, I repeat never have eye contact with car drivers, whether you are on 2 wheels or 4. Bad habit that.
 

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Oh, and my safety tip of the day; Never, I repeat never have eye contact with car drivers, whether you are on 2 wheels or 4. Bad habit that.
I like to keep an eye on the driver's head. It will be a tell tail sign telling where the driver is headed.
You can't do that in NV. All the windows are tinted. It should be against the law.

Ride Safe, KEN
 

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+1 0n that Ken and I'll add hands to that too. Actually, there are many nuances we watch to compute what their move might be and what our action might be.
 

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When a you meet a car at a stop sign, don’t look at the driver, watch their front tire. You will always notice when that tire starts turning.
 

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Just bought a gently used 2013 Vegas 8-ball, now I'm learning to ride it. Signed up for the community college course to get my endorsement, and figured joining a Victory forum would be the next logical step. I have friends who ride but a forum of people who know my bike and can answer questions for it specifically will be a big help. Thankyou.

Jeffery.
Best advice I can give you, is to learn that steering a motorcycle is the opposite of steering a car (counter-steering)! Learn that you are not using your body weight to initiate a lean, you use the handlebars, and turn the wheel the opposite of the direction you wish to lean. For example, in order to go left (and lean left), you must kick the bottom of the bike to the right. This concept is called counter-steering, and you MUST MUST MUST learn it and ingrain it in your head!! :) Some folks translate this into push on the right handlebar to go right, push on the left handlebar to go left, whatever works... but you need to learn that you are steering a motorcycle from the ground up.

Second best advice I can give you, is that your front brakes are responsible for the majority of your stopping power, 80% or more! When a motorcycle is forced to slow down, the weight transfers from the back tire to the front, making the rear brake much less effective than the front.
 

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To simplify Gunslinger's post...push right to turn right...push left to turn left. That is, push forward on the grip that's in the direction you want to turn. This works at speeds above 15mph. Any slower and you bar steer.
 

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Thankyou everyone. The counter steering is even in the dmv hanbook. I've been watching YouTube videos and picking up little does and don'ts. Plan to do a lot of parking lot practice even before the class. I dont want to make a fool of myself. They do provide honda 250's for the class. They will probably be easier to ride than my vegas.
 

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Thankyou everyone. The counter steering is even in the dmv hanbook. I've been watching YouTube videos and picking up little does and don'ts. Plan to do a lot of parking lot practice even before the class. I dont want to make a fool of myself. They do provide honda 250's for the class. They will probably be easier to ride than my vegas.
At ultra slow speeds, such as parking lot maneuvers, 90 degree turns, and U turns, you pretty much treat the bike like a horse, and let it dip and lean under you while you stay more upright. At faster speeds, you can lean WITH the bike (after initiating the lean with the bars, per above).
 

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All good advise above. Only thing I can add is, don't use the front brake at slow speeds with the bars turned. It will tip you over RIGHT NOW! If you put a foot down you can fail the riders test (or have several points off toward failing).

And to reiterate.... DEFENSE DEFENSE DEFENSE. Ride like you are invisible
 

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Thankyou everyone. The counter steering is even in the dmv hanbook. I've been watching YouTube videos and picking up little does and don'ts. Plan to do a lot of parking lot practice even before the class. I dont want to make a fool of myself. They do provide honda 250's for the class. They will probably be easier to ride than my vegas.
I wouldn't over-think counter-steering.. It seems to occur naturally..

Hard to describe the mechanics of it.. You almost steer from the hip.. Your body twists as you lean while your arms stay more rigid.. But you don't think about that.. It just kinda happens.. For example.. Turning left at speed, You'll find yourself slowly leaning left into a corner, the more you lean the more you automatically place more weight on the left hand-grip while pulling on the right hand-grip, so the bars turn right anyway..

It really seems more natural than .. ARRGGGHHH HERE'S A LEFT I GOTSTA STEER RIGHT!! :ltr:

I doubt it was just me, but when you first start out, and you reach that speed where normal steering doesn't work, you find yourself leaning into (counter-steering through) a corner automatically.. That motion - counter-steering it's just a natural thing that you don't really think about, you just do it..

It's Much easier to do it than explain it :D .. cheers
 

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and if you're anything like me its a lot easier than riding a horse.
"giddy-up"...lotsa neddies under your control!
Good Luck out there.
 

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+1 on what RICZ said. Push forward on the grip, not down. It is natural when the bike leans into the corner to push down on the downside grip, which will cause counter steer to some degree, but pushing forward is the most precise and controlled way to counter steer. Here in Wahington state, the basic mc class has exercises built into its program that teaches counter steer. I also wouldn't hesitate to rent or buy the Ride Like A Pro series. Good luck!!!
 
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