Victory Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys!! Just joined his forum in hopes of some clarification and opinion seeking advice... I currently ride an Yamaha R3 and am looking to make the jump to a cruiser-esque bike. I LOVE the Octane, but am also intrigued by the Judge.. what are your opinions? I'm interested in hearing all feedback.. my typical riding habits are in town cruising, commuting to work ( about a 50 minute total ride each way but only about 30mins, again each way, is highway 70mph+) hitting some twisty roads, but I don't lean the bike over much... thanks guys!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,078 Posts
Welcome from CT
I'm a fan of the Octane...so that's my pick for you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
Much of that will depend on which one is more comfortable. The Octane feels small to me and from what I've read the shocks suck for life sized dudes.

The Judge would be my pick for me out of the two. You should get saddle time with each and go from there.


PS- learn to ride. Anybody can ride a bike straight. It's the slow speed, tight turning, leaning that sets the real riders apart. Learning proper techniques will save your life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,299 Posts
The Judge has the Freedom 106 engine that has a lot of aftermarket stuff out there to mod it and support it. Not so the Octane. There will be more info and help here for the Judge.
I am confused and concerned about your admission to not leaning a bike much. What exactly do you mean by that? We need a clarification before making further suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The Judge has the Freedom 106 engine that has a lot of aftermarket stuff out there to mod it. Not so the Octane. There will be more info here for the Judge.

I am confused and concerned ab out your admission to not leaning a bike much. What exactly do you mean by that? We need a clarification before making further suggestions.


No worries! lol I just meant that I don't knee drag and go all out on the twisties... I usually am riding on straight roads. There's really not that many twists around me.. I'd prefer a bike that can do highway speeds with ease, which I think both bikes mentioned can do. I am a fan of the forward controls on the Octane. I don't think the Judge has that unless it's aftermarket?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
No worries! lol I just meant that I don't knee drag and go all out on the twisties... I usually am riding on straight roads. There's really not that many twists around me.. I'd prefer a bike that can do highway speeds with ease, which I think both bikes mentioned can do. I am a fan of the forward controls on the Octane. I don't think the Judge has that unless it's aftermarket?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I'm sure you can find a nice used Judge with forward controls already installed. Plus it will probably already have exhaust and other goodies.

RICZ is correct about the parts for the two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Truth is, there is hardly a bike on the market over half a liter that can't keep up on the freeway. So, you might consider a lot of other parameters for changing bikes. I know you're not considering it, but as an example, I opted for my CCT because not only will it do straight lines all day with ease, but it will do twisties with greater ease than most other "non" sport bikes of the size. Not that I do a lot of twisties either, but when the chance presents itself, It's nice to know that I can and not be bothered by having to compromise.

Maybe you've been on a bike for a long time now and really know what you want. If so, great. But if this is new to you and you are looking to step up, then do yourself a favor and think a little farther into the future. It's been my experience that IF you love to ride and plan to do so for some time, then odds are you will "outgrow" your bike if you limit yourself when buying.

And like VVB said, there is more to twisties than just the fun. It's a learning thing that also translates to better bike handling over all. This translates into safer riding. Good luck. Personally, I'm a fan of the aluminum frame bikes, but that's just me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,299 Posts
We deal with a lot of twisties here in the western halves of WA, OR and NorCal and my Cross Roads carves them so well. I've been riding 65 years now and I have never had a bike that impressed me so much and in every facet as my Cross Roads. But all Cross bikes handle similarly due to a very rigid cast alloy frame. Unless you really like to carry your stuff in a backpack (I don't) having a couple capacious bags is a Godsend.
The neat thing about a XR is its versatility with its removable windshield. I have two windshields; a medium height and a cut down one, so I have three choices for various riding and weather conditions. I used to have multiple bikes, but my XR is so user friendly that there is no need for another bike taking space in the garage. Just saying.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top