Victory Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone!

I am looking to get advice from some of you Victory owners. I am a brand new rider. So new that I have been on ONE motorcycle in my life and didn't get it out of first gear, haha. I will be taking the safety course at a local college next weekend.

The advice I'm hoping to get is whether or not a Victory is "too much bike" for a new rider. I have my eyes on a 2015 Gunner and I'm having a hard time looking at other bikes due to all of the positive things I've heard about Victory as well as the Gunner. The thing is beautiful also.

The guys at the dealer insisted that a new rider can handle a Gunner, which is to be expected of some salesmen. Can someone throw me a piece of their mind and let me know if I'll be regretting purchasing such a powerful bike?

I look forward to hearing from you guys, and I'm also looking forward to being a member and contributing to this forum!

Jéan Saysee
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,414 Posts
I suggest that you take that BRC course before you make any decisions. They will give you a small bike, 125 to 250 cc, to ride in the course. At the end of the course you will have a much better feel for your abilities. Victory builds very large displacement bikes with relatively high power. That means that a rider, any rider, must respect the power their bike can deliver to the rear wheels. I would suggest that they might prove to be a real handful for a new rider but it can be done if you are careful enough. What it takes is your personal discipline. If you can control a desire to twist the throttle, any Victory can be a decent enough first bike but that will be tough to do, especially on a light weight steel frame bike. I ride a Vision which has tons of power but is also very heavy. I have been doing this stuff for over 45 years so I have grown to appreciate the power without me abusing it. Not everyone can say that and young new riders are the most challenged in that respect. I really don't want to tell you to look elsewhere but make darned sure you are ready to control the urge to twist that throttle. It can quite literally kill you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Oldman! I appreciate your honesty. I am a 30 year old husband and father of 2 beautiful daughters. Of course think about opening up ANY bike I buy, but honestly, I know better. I may eventually be called a sissy by my friends who ride also lol. Safety and taking my time is my utmost priority no matter what bike I get.

The salesman at the dealer admitted multiple times how great the power is. He also said that it is very controllable which is one of the beauties of Victory bikes. I will test drive one once I take the BRC and see how I like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
A few years my 30 year old daughter wanted a motorcycle. A 600 cc GSXR crouch rocket. I wasn't happy but it was what she wanted. We went to a dealer and the first thing he did is get between me and her and started to talk to me about the 600. When my daughter told him the bike was for her he said OH IT WOULD BE TOO MUCH FOR YOU. My daughter asked him if the 250cc bike that he told her was what she needed would do the speed limit? He said yes. She then asked him if the 600cc would do the speed limit and again he said yes. She then told him that she had been ridding since age five and could probably ride better that him. She then said dad lets go and find a dealer that knows what they are talking about. I guess what I am trying to say is: buy WHAT YOU FEEL COMFORTABLE ON, if your feet feel planted to the ground when you stop, if YOU feel comfortable sitting on the bike and ridding it, if YOU feel comfortable with the weight and the way it handles, it dosen't matter how big it is. It is all about YOU and how COMFORTABLE YOU ARE and HOW YOU INTEND TO RIDE. I have owned many bikes and LOVE my VICTORY VEGAS JACKOPT. Wouldn't trade it for any other bike. Just my 2 cents. Good luck and always ride safe and know YOUR limitations
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,684 Posts
If you sit on the Gunner , and your feet are flat on the floor , you can ride it . These bikes are so well balanced anyone that can ride a pedal bike can ride a Vic . I would love a new Gunner , oh , and a new Magnum too .:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
Take the BRC And when you get a new bike dress properly...
And what with the low seat it has' The Gunner can be a great first bike.
I've been riding for 45 years and I can tell you the Gunner is one of the better handling bikes I've owned. Especially parking lot speeds.thumb up
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
the first bike i ever "owned" was a 07 Jackpot with some decent motor mods. yes i rode a good bit before i got it but i would not go buy a rebel 250 to "learn" on, because to get rid of it would be nearly impossible. i would go with the gunner, because the thing is as long as you respect what is at your right hand you will be fine. now if you jump on it and start pinning it out in every gear....well make sure you hug your wife and kids before you leave. dont ride above your comfort level, it may take a while but you will get used to it, and learn to handle it. good luck and make sure you drop your helmet on the road when you get it. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
My $0.02

Like the OP, I'm not a lifelong rider. I learned how to ride in my 30's, without ever having been on a bike before. No friends to show me the ropes. I went and took the MSF course at a local college like the OP is doing, and then off I went.

Some folks will agree with my opinion, some will vehemently disagree, but it's my post so my thoughts... ;)

I think a Big Twin is too much bike for an inexperienced rank newbie. Same goes for sportbikes. I say this as someone who WAS that newbie a few years ago.

I suggest you pick up an inexpensive Standard or under-900cc cruiser on Ebay or Craigslist. Ride it, get experience on it, drop it if need be [it's a lot better dropping a older Shadow or Sporty while you're learning than dropping a shiny new Gunner]. When you feel as though you're confident enough as a rider, then you get to reward yourself with a "new" bike. Go sell your beater inexpensively on Craigslist and then go shopping. :D

I am preaching what I practiced, because this is exactly what I did.

This may be the time for some Tuff Guy © reading this to reply, "Raa! I'm a Tuff Guy © who learned how to ride on a 2400cc Rocket III when I was an infant! Don't be a pu$$y!" or something of that nature.

To which I reply to you in advance, DON'T feel pressured into getting yourself into something too big/too fast when you have already admitted that you are just starting out. Get what you honestly feel comfortable with. Craigslist and Ebay will be there for you to sell it off cheap next spring and then reward your experience with your 'real' bike. cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
PS - I'm a huge proponent of the various motorcycle safety courses for new riders, as should be anyone on here with a brain. It's a great idea that you're already signed up before just running out and buying a bike on a whim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
Welcome to the Mayhem!!!!!:crzy:

I am a proponent to both schools of thought. If you are mature and self disciplined enough to start off, then by all means do it. In 3-6 months you'll be looking to upgrade.

Second train, is get a used V Strom or the like and learn to ride and survive the street. The Strom will most likely get the return you put in to it, is solid, reliable, enough power for the street, and ugly enough if you drop it, it will still be ugly. LOL Less of a loss if you decide to scrap the whole motorcycle thing as well.

Take your course and decide how you want to proceed. Like I said I am supportive of either train of thought, but then you'll have a better idea of how you feel and won't be shopping again very soon if you have what it takes to start out on a Gunner or the like. We all proceed at different rates, none are bad, just different.

Have fun with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,292 Posts
I am of two minds as well. I'll try to share my thoughts on the subject as clearly as I can, so bear with me lol

In favor of going big early on:
the 106 is powerful, but not difficult to manage.
Victory builds a well-balanced, easy to handle motorcycle.
Reliability and ease of maintenance actually make Vic a great choice for a beginner, because all you have to do is ride it and change the oil for the first 10,000 miles.
You're not going to outgrow it in a season or two. Doesn't mean you won't get the itch for something different, but you won't outgrow it.

Against going big early on:
A case of whiskey throttle will likely result in broken bones.
A $15000 bike is a very expensive toy to break because you dumped it.
There is a fine line between respecting a bike's power and fearing it. If you experience issues controlling the motorcycle and its power and become afraid, then you're probably ruined on the sport.

A lot of guys might say it's all in your head, whether a bike's too big for you. I don't know about that for sure. I do recommend buying a $1500 beater, an old Kawi, or Suzuki or Honda, and getting your sea legs first. It's not just important to learn to control the bike, you need to learn to negotiate traffic and obstacles as well. And if you lose your **** on gravel or a funky turn, you'll feel a lot less bad dumping an old Shadow or Intruder than you would a shiny new Gunner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thank you much, everyone! I will definitely keep everyone's advice in mind when buying a motorcycle. Although I have close to no experience, I am confident enough in my self discipline to not act like a jackass on a Victory, or any bike at that matter.

Hopefully, the safety course will help me determine whether or not to get something with less power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
I got my first bike in 2011. I'm now 55. It was a used 2007 Honda 750.

I did not take a course but actually got to be a fairly good rider... until I made a rookie mistake. I turned to right at 5 mph, hit my front brake in loose gravel I didn't see, and immediately hit the pavement.

I was able to get the bike home but it was totaled.

I caution you to change your mind and get something similar to a 750. No matter how well you think you are doing, you can go down before you know it and be as shocked at I was.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
I had an old man tell me the 3 rules to riding a motorcycle,
1. People cant see you. Welcome to the world of invisibility, enjoy your new superpower/curse.
2. Sand and gravel have been placed on this earth by the devil just to torment you.
3. At any given time that motorcycle may flip over and ride you just as stupid as you have been riding it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
My first road bike....

I'm 52 years young and I bought the '15 Gunner for my first road bike back in May and I can say it is not to big for a first bike. I thought the same thing when I was shopping around, but at the same time I did not want to buy a smaller bike, and then want to trade it in 3-6 months later. This one I know I will keep for a long time, because I really enjoy riding it everyday I can. Go big or buy a scooter. thumb up

cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,292 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Well, one thing is for sure, I will not be a "stupid" rider. As I said before, caution and safety are tied for number one on my list of priorities when riding. Hopefully, the safety course and the test drive the follows will tell all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Some will say they did just fine staying on a big bike and others will argue start smaller and learn.

I'm in the start smaller crowd. My first bike was a Honda Hurricane, 600cc and to be honest it retarded my learning curve. I would have been better off getting a 500cc VFR and learning better control and basics of motorcycle riding. I got lucky and only went down once due to lack of skill, but it made it harder for me to learn the basics properly.

I'd suggest a used Honda Shadow 750 pick it up cheap and practice, practice and practice some more. The ride like a pro videos are great and the exercises help you learn the muscle memory to ride safely.

Whatever you decide. I wish you well and hope you have a long motorcycling career. cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
682 Posts
The first real motorcycle I rode was my buddy's Yamaha 600 crotch rocket. It was old and spray painted so I was able to concentrate more on getting the hang of riding rather than being afraid of dumping it. My 03 is the first bike I've owned, and had no problems getting used to it and controlling its power. Like one of the guys previously said, respect the bike, but don't be afraid of it. I never took an MSF course, but I would recommend to do so. If I can find one by me I will take it. If the gunner fits you and you like it, go for it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
The more I read on here, as well as the rest of the web, I am about 60/40 in favor of getting a Vic Gunner. I was 90/10 prior to these replies. I am all for practicing, then practicing some more, THEN when I'm done practicing, I'm going to practice some more. I have no intentions on getting on any busy roads. The side of town I live on has plenty of side streets as well as low traffic main streets. I considered buying used, I just don't want to have to worry about the hassle of selling it once I'm ready to upgrade. I have even considering buying a cheaper new bike, such as a Yamaha Bolt to ride for a few seasons, but again, I don't want to have to worry about selling.

I am STUCK on Victory bikes. I have read tons of reviews on the gunner and there are little to no cons presented by the reviewer. I know it's a bike that if, and it's a big IF I feel I want to sell, I will have a much easier time.

I guess I am just a little confused now lol.

BUT, my rider safety course is this coming weekend. I'm totally excited about it, and again, it BETTER help me decide what bike is best for me.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top