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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys.
I just picked up my first street bike today. What a feeling, hitting the highway on a bike for the first time!

I purchased a 2001 Victory V92 from a dealer for $3900 (including tax, registration, and plate). It's got about 10,000 miles on it, and appears to be in great shape.

I don't know if this is a good deal in the big scheme of things, but it's worth every penny to me :D

My main reason for joining this forum, is to draw upon your experiences riding, and maintaining your bike, since I prefer not to re-invent the wheel.

Anyway I'm sure you'll see me around cheers
 

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get a photobucket account and put all your pics on there. then you can hover over the little gear in upper right corner of your pic, and choose 'get links' from drop down menu, click on the bottom one, then paste it here in your message.
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All I could say if you look for some advice on being a new rider is this: when taking a turn(corner) scan for anything on the road/parking lot that looks like it could be slippery, and then assume the whole corner is made out of that stuff, and adjust speed to be safe. reason is, if you're cornering like it's dry, then hit even a patch of water, mud, sand, gravel, snow, ice, oil, etc.. then you'll be going to fast for that one little patch and could lose control.
. I learned that lesson on a '72 honda cb200 in a parking lot. just crossed over a small stream of water in the asphalt parking lot and wham! down she went. wasn't even cornering hard.
probably the old hard tires, but the principle stands to reason.
 

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oh yeah, I usually advise a prospective new rider to get something small, light, and easily controllable. like a 250cc or something like a honda rebel.
just to get used to the feeling of doing different things before stepping up to power.
just like anything else, you gotta learn control before speed.
the only other time I think you'd ever have trouble, is when parking and turning real tight real slow.
. when you come to park and you're on the brake and about to turn and stop suddenly, make sure you're feet are ready, cuz it's easy to stop a little too quick and you'll still be in the turn a little, and drop the bike down towards the inside of your curve.
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shoot, just drive defensively. I've had a few defensive driving classes, mostly for trucking, but it really makes a difference.
if I can remember some of those things: leave yourself an out, make sure they see you, position yourself for good visibility, and so on....
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what part of michigan you in? I've been up that way.
 

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I'm of the opinion, the size of the bike means little... The amount of skill means everything.

Get yourself into a course as soon as possible, such as the MSF Beginner Riders Course or "Ride Like a Pro" or similar. Even find yourself an independent instructor if all else fails. Developing your skills will make the biggest difference and possibly save your life. Seriously.

It's been a while since I took the MSF course back in 2003.. I want to take the Ride Like a Pro Course, and I've been on two wheels since 2001. I had been on a bike for a couple years prior to taking even the beginner course, and in 2 days I was 10 times a better rider. You can never stop learning to be a better rider.

Search for "Ride like a pro" on youtube. I can't vouch for the course as I've not taken it, but looks good.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hey guys I really appreciate the advice, I only wish I saw it a little sooner.

Accidentally unsubscribed to a few of my earlier posts due to fat fingers and usin my smartphone, heh.

I definitely plan on taking a MSF class though they were booked through August.

I did learn some of the basics on an enduro bike I picked up last summer, mainly for just quick stops in the small town near by, and for use on the trails at home.

It's an '85 Honda XR200R, and I'm really glad I learned on that first. Much lighter, slower, and I'm glad I learned the clutch on that bike first, saving the clutch and transmission of my Victory some abuse of a brand new rider.

By the way suzukispider I'm near Lansing. cheers
 
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