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hi

i'm 100% newbie to motorcycles, victories, and everything in between

my wife and I have wanted motorcycles for years, and have decided to get a pair in the next few months. after much research, i personally have decided that i really, really want a victory. My wife being a little petite thing hasn't decided what she wants yet(she's 4'10" and might have trouble with most bikes)

we plan on taking our MSF course sometime next spring. I'm looking for advice and knowledge into what i'm getting myself into.
 

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l0s3r421 said
we plan on taking our MSF course sometime next spring. I'm looking for advice and knowledge into what i'm getting myself into.

With the course or with the whole thing? The course is pretty straight forward, or should be. Road rules, riding and handling techniques, how to do certain things and inbred habits that will get you in trouble and how to avoid them. An example is, as humans we focus on danger. It is what we do and it is correct in most situations, BUT not on a MC. The bike will go where you look, so that habit has to go. One example of many but you get the idea.
If possible learn to operate the controls and how to shift and brake. If you don't feel good with that find a learning course to go along with the MSF course. Some are combined, some not and the learning course may be difficult to find. Ask your instructor for some help on this one.

If you are asking about motorcycling, well, it is what you make it. If you want to see the country as part of the movie instead of watching it, a MC is for you. De-stressing after a day at work, yes. Meeting and socializing, you can do that too.

Welcome to the mayhem. Good luck, and hope you find what you are looking for. As you may have gathered it is differnt for lots of folks and they are all right.

cheers
 

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l0s3r421 said
we plan on taking our MSF course sometime next spring. I'm looking for advice and knowledge into what i'm getting myself into.

With the course or with the whole thing? The course is pretty straight forward, or should be. Road rules, riding and handling techniques, how to do certain things and inbred habits that will get you in trouble and how to avoid them. An example is, as humans we focus on danger. It is what we do and it is correct in most situations, BUT not on a MC. The bike will go where you look, so that habit has to go. One example of many but you get the idea.
If possible learn to operate the controls and how to shift and brake. If you don't feel good with that find a learning course to go along with the MSF course. Some are combined, some not and the learning course may be difficult to find. Ask your instructor for some help on this one.

If you are asking about motorcycling, well, it is what you make it. If you want to see the country as part of the movie instead of watching it, a MC is for you. De-stressing after a day at work, yes. Meeting and socializing, you can do that too.

Welcome to the mayhem. Good luck, and hope you find what you are looking for. As you may have gathered it is differnt for lots of folks and they are all right.

cheers
thanks for the advice.

yeah i'm looking at pretty much everything. I'm "motorcycle stupid", if that makes sense?

let's start with advice on helmets. as a new rider, are there any recommendations you lot can give me on what i should be looking at? full face, modular, open, etc...
 

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10s... May I suggest a Yamaha bolt for your wife. It's a nice little motorcycle for a smaller person.
she really, really likes the iron 883. her only real "want" on an MC is "matte black", i think she's open to everything else. We were looking at the street 500s and 750s for her as well.
 

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let's start with advice on helmets. as a new rider, are there any recommendations you lot can give me on what i should be looking at? full face, modular, open, etc...
Well, there is a Pandora's Box type question. My wife and I prefer FF. Some like modular, some half or 3/4. About all I can say that would be "good" advice is search the web for answers. The 1970's are gone. FF and the rest have modern venting so heat isn't much of a problem, and modern eye ports, so my glasses block more than the helmet ever thought about.
With that in mind, and the absolute best thing is get you and your wife fitted. Not the clerk working the counter at the local, or not so local, bike/helmet shop, but a real fitting. SOmeone who can determine you head shape, size and correct fit. These folks can be hard to find but no matter how hard you have to look the investment in time and effort are the best you can make. If it hurts or is not fitting right, you either won't wear it or it won't do all it could in the event of using it for what it was made.
After a good fitting and deciding what suits your fancy, find the protection rating you want (I prefer ECE 2205) but it is a preference. All should be DOT certified, but SNELL, ECE, etc have strong and less strong points. SNELL has come in line to be closer to ECE standards with the DOT penetration standard as well. All good, but there is argument around. Go figure, LOL

We also wear armored jackets and pants. We don't heal like we did when younger and I'm allergic to pain. So, will it save your bacon in every circumstance? DOn't be rediculous. It does keep us more comfortable in heat and cold and less to putz with in changing conditions. All this is another rant, so it will come later or if you would like I can send some links. Go to http://ironbutt.com/about/default.cfm?CFID=8722225&CFTOKEN=71263073 and lurk around. Lots of info and opinions from a collection of folks that ride farther and in conditions most won't. It is also a collective so not just one lifetime of wisdom there. Even if you don't ride like this or never have an intention to, it is good info.

Have fun with the quest!
 

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My wife is 5' nothing and nothing Victory made would fit her. Ended up getting her a HD Nightster. Bet that Victory will be offering a small bike in the next year.
 

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My wife is 5' nothing and nothing Victory made would fit her. Ended up getting her a HD Nightster. Bet that Victory will be offering a small bike in the next year.
no matter what i know we're both going used with our first bikes. I've read that you will likely drop your first bike, and i'd feel awful laying down a brand new motorcycle.

nightster is another good consideration for her, it looks like it's an iron 883 with a bigger motor.
 

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I wonder how tall that new Indian scout is?

You might go by the library and get this book:

Most MSF courses are based on his work.
Give you something to read over the winter. It's a fun book to read I recommend it to anyone who rides.

Too be honest I would recommend that the two of you buy a used 250-400 cc bike as a learner bike and then keep it as a go to the store motorcycle afterwards. They are just handy as heck to have around.
They are not overly intimidating. They don't weigh much and are remarkably fast in their own right. There is a much better chance of success that way. They can be often had cheaply if you look around on craigslist.

Be sure to take it buy a motorcycle shop to have it checked out before you sign the check. You don't want to buy a future bill, you really want a small trouble free bike.
You will want to find a shop that will check it out before you start looking as getting something in and out of a motorcycle shop can be daunting some times.

These modern high powered bikes are dangerous. They have a lot of power for what they weigh and disregarding that fact will lead you places you don't want to end up.

I'm not saying that you can't do it, just that if you just jump on a full size bike and learn to ride, it won't be near as enjoyable as doing it on something that you can quickly master and not be afraid that you will loose your life or be badly injured should you make a simple mistake. When I learned to ride 48 years ago I made a lot of mistakes and I have made a lot since.
I think you become a better rider faster on a small bike because they are more forgiving when you push them a little too far. You can recover much easier from your misjudgments.

It's supposed to be about having fun after all.
Then it is on to the Vic or the whatever, and you still have this great little run around bike that gets a luggage rack and a milk crate on the back to run to the store on.

My daughter has my 250 right now, but I loved that little bike when it was here. Good cheap fun.
Sorry about the double post. I must have hit post instead of preview.
 

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My advise:

Make defensive driving habitual and always devote your complete attention to what the other motorists are doing. Always keep it in your mind that "they can't see you". As you get more experienced, these things become second nature.

One other piece of advise ... you need to become "ONE" with your bike. If you can't do that, you'll never feel confident and in control. The bike itself will play a large part in attaining that feeling.
 

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you need to become "ONE" with your bike.
Indeed. This will come over time, for sure. Comes faster for some folks than others, but it'll come with experience.

No one was born knowing how to ride, everyone starts at the same place. Some of them started out younger than us however lol
 

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no matter what i know we're both going used with our first bikes. I've read that you will likely drop your first bike, and i'd feel awful laying down a brand new motorcycle.



nightster is another good consideration for her, it looks like it's an iron 883 with a bigger motor.

THIS!

I picked up a sportster for my wife about 2 months ago. She has done about 15 rides with us and did perfect. Then... We got to a stop sign on a hill Sunday, she tried to work the clutch to take off from a hill and her feet got out of under her when it slightly rolled back and she dropped it. I had to pick it up for her, no damage. Pretty much everyone drops a bike once, whether it is at a stop light or in the garage.



Sent from Motorcycle.com App
 

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I would recommend starting out by taking a MSF dirtbike riders course first and foremost. http://www.dirtbikeschool.org/

Learn to ride in the dirt, take the time to get the feel for a motorcycle in adverse conditions while having fun at the same time doing trail riding. Get some experience there and then move onto a street program after maybe your first year. Dirt bikes can be had for cheap and you dont have to worry about wrecking them.

Once you both feel very good about your abilities then get into your street stuff, check out bikes with the awareness you now have from your dirt experience and how to handle things from that perspective. Typically if you have ridden dirt, street comes much easier than the other way around. Your senses in paying attention to detail comes into play on the street after you have ridden dirt for some time. And on the street is where you need that sense of 'detail' in all yopur surroundings.

All I can say about helmets (and all your safety gear) is what is your body worth to you???? If you look at it from that perspective than you'll be just fine.
 

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PTC speaks good wisdom here... If all your worrying about on the street is other drivers and not controlling the motorcycle you will be much better off.
 

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Yeah, helmet advice can be tricky. I have a full face and a half, and like them both for different reasons. the full is nice because it protects you from the elements and in my case, I can wear my prescription glasses. The half is nice in good weather because you really feel like you're out in the wind...but I don't have RX riding glasses yet and as I can no longer wear contacts, I have to sacrifice a little visibility. That basically means if I want to wear my halfie, I have to make an effort to get home or get done before it gets dark.

Another bike I'd suggest is the Honda Shadow Spirit. They're small, light, reliable, and there's a ton of used ones out there. The Honda VLX is an option too.
 
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