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Discussion Starter #2
and I'm beginning to regret my decision to move to a bigger bike
 

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Not knowing where you live or what year bike you have stop take a deep breath and give it a chance.
Is the bike mass just to big for you or what
 

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Not knowing where you live or what year bike you have stop take a deep breath and give it a chance.
Is the bike mass just to big for you or what.
Read your owners manual and get to know your bike first
 

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a lot heftier than my vtx 1300C was. once on the road it feels lighter.
i had lots of ?'s too. still havent stopped asking.--irv
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm great while I"m moving.....slowing down to a stop is becoming an issue, as well as a few other things. I'm a small person...5'2" on a good day, and not as strong as I used to be. Afterall....I am a grandmother

I live in Mesa, Az. About a month ago my husband took me over to the Victory dealer for a test drive event they were hosting. I pretty much fell in love with the power right out of the gate.

I've been on a 2009 Suzuki C50T. It's a great bike and I haven't had any issues with it at all, except....for long rides it's just too small to keep up with the hubster on his goldwing. Although we live in the desert, people don't realize that AZ is VERY moutianous, which makes for some of the best rides in the country. But the little 800 struggles a bit and it has to be pushed to some extent.

Downside to the Suzuki: I'm SO comfortable on it that I've learned to give it a lot of body language to make it do what I want. I'm concerned that I'm too comfortable with it and have lost respect for it's ability to injure me in an emergency situation.

I've had the XC for 4 days now. We took a road trip the day after I bought it. I've driven it around town some and to work and back for two days. I've dropped it 3 times - twice to the left, once to the right.

Here are the specs on the XC:
2011 Cross Country two-tone white/silver
Lowered 1" with the lower heated seat (2" total lowering)
2" extended handlebars (makes steering interesting)

Here are my concerns so far:

1. This bike is HUGE compared to the Suzuki. Once it starts going over I am not even remotely strong enough to stop it. Fortunately, my legs are short enough that I won't get caught underneath it.
2. Thinking about going another inch lower so that my feet are completely flat on the ground. Right now I'm on the balls of my feet.
3. The seat is very wide. Leaves me pretty saddle sore and I think it throws off my balance when I go to put my feet down when stopping.
4. Backing up is a bit of a challenge. Not because it's too hard to push, but because once it starts tipping one way or the other I can't muscle it up like I can the Suzuki.
5. While I love the power, it does feel a bit sluggish in the throttle.

There's more, but this is the core of it
 

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You tipped your hand about at least a couple things...
Have you ever taken a rider course? If not, do not pass GO, do not collect $200, go directly to a course. You'll be amazed at what you'll learn.
But before you do, take yourself and your bike to a saddle customizer to get it narrowed and lowered a bit for a better reach to the ground. Tip-toeing is, in my book, a no-no that leads to problems. Personal disclaimer; I have been riding over 60 years and never liked cruisers, but cancer (and maybe age) dictated a lower seat height. Fortunately, Victory came up with the perfect cruiser for cruiser haters at the right time, in the form of the Cross Roads.
Lastly, you may have bitten off more than you can chew as the bike does not seem to be a good fit for you. If that's the case, you are going to dislike your bike more and more. Just sayin'.
P.S. I re-read your posts and came across you saying something about keeping up with hubby. Another no-no! The smaller bike and/or the less experienced rider should be in the lead. Doing the opposite, causes said less experienced rider to have to ride anotherrider's ride, thus violating a prime rule; Ride your own ride.
Look up Ride Like A Pro on YouTube. Also check out Capt. Crash Videos. Good luck.
 

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No matter how long you have ridden, take an advanced riders course ON THAT BIKE. It will teach you in short order how that bike can be handled in slow and emergency situations.

I understand what you mean about your last bike. I put 80k on my last one and my new XR felt very foreign at first, hence the strong recommendation of the riders course.

There are several ways to address your short inseam but I recommend a custom seat. Lowering the bike translates to loss of clearance. You could go with a full-on customization, such as Russell Day Long saddle, or wait for the new Mustang seat, due to be released in about a month. The Mustang lowers the driver 1/2 inch and, historically, moves the driver 1/2 forward. For the time being, you might consider thick and or healed boots.

Keep us posted. You enjoy the power and I hope you enjoy making the bike yours.

Ride safe.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm afraid you may be right.

Took the rider's course with TEAM Arizona before I got my license and bought my Suzuki. I did learn a great deal, even after having ridden dirt bikes quite a bit.

I wasn't happy about buying the XC with my feet not well placed on the ground, which is why I'm considering lowering it another 1". Still reading up on this subject to find the best possible situation.

As for the seat, we've talked about having the pointed corners cut from the front of it, and shaping it so that there's less seat to deal with there. That will probably go a long way toward me liking the bike more.
 

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I'm intrigued you find the bike sluggish in the throttle. I came from a Kawi Vulcan 900, the direct competitor to the 50 CI-series Boulevards and in the same power range. My Cross Roads, frankly, goes like a bat out of hell when the throttle is opened and is completely stock.

As for the rest, well, everyone else has pretty much covered it, and I'm gonna assume you probably have more riding experience than me anyway. But I will say these are great bikes, and I hope you find your comfort zone with yours.
 
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