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I just installed my Lloydz cams in my 2011 XC and I thought I would give some feedback after the install in order to help any future installers. First of all I am going to reference PhilC64's cam install instructions that he wrote up because he did a great job. They can be found here:

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B95Bg763O92RN2QtUEpoLVBSSi1SYW1XVXFpeU9fUQ/edit?pli=1

So I'm going to assume that anyone planning on doing this mod has or will read PhilC64's instructions. I just wanted to add some of my observations.

-First of all, I'm also going to assume the if anyone is attempting to do their own cam install that they have some experience doing this type of work. If you aren't confident in your wrenching abilities you may want to pay an experienced shop to do the work. It's not the most difficult work I've ever done on a bike, but I'd give it a solid 3 out of 5 stars for difficulty.

-Before you start make sure that you have a really good assortment of metric sockets and wrenches. When your working in the space between the frame and the cylinder heads you will need several different lengths of sockets to get in the right places. For example, I had to use a 15mm deep socket, 1/2" drive, to torque my cam carrier bolts. No other socket or extension combinations would work.

-In PhilC64's instructions he mentions that you can use a 1 1/16" socket to turn the engine over. That socket will only work if it is a 6 point socket. If you have a 1 1/16" 12 point socket it will not work.

-You are going to zip tie the cam chains to the bikes frame to keep them from falling into the engine after you pull the cam sprocket. When you do this make sure you pull the zip ties fairly tight and don't leave much slack in the chain. If you leave a lot of slack in the cam chain they will bind up in the cam followers and stop the engine from turning.

-When I pulled the cam chain cover off half of it stayed with the engine and the other half stayed with cover. So I pulled the gasket in two pieces. The problem is that I have the typical problem with no Victory dealership close and nobody stocks that gasket anyways. So instead of riding my bike after the cam install I'm waiting on a gasket and that is frustrating. I would recommend buying a new cam chain cover gasket and new sealing washers to go under the cam chain tensioners before you start the job.

-You are going to need a tiny & strong magnet to pull the pins out of the cam carrier. If you have one of those automotive style extending magnets trust me it is not going to work. I used some little 3/16" disc style rare earth magnets that I bought at radioshack and they did the trick.

-In the cam chain install you pull both cams then reinstall the new cams beginning with the rear cam. You have to reset the timing of the engine when you install the new cams. If I were doing this again I would pull the first cam, then install the new cam in the exact same position without moving the engine. You could button everything down then move to the next cam. If you did this with both cams then you could button up the engine and not have to worry about resetting the timing of the engine because you would have never moved it. I pull the cams on my bro's V-Rod in this manner and it saves me the step of having to reset the engine timing.

That's it. I can't wait to see how the bike runs with the new cams but it will be late this week before the gasket comes in.
 

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I completely agree..whith what you said. I did have the 1 1/16 socket to turn the motor over but after trying it I got alittle skiddish on messing up the timing key. So I used the bolt that holds on the timing gear...put 2 nuts on it "double nutted' ha ha about half way and that way turning the crank that way, worked great.

I zipped tied mine to loose and the cam chain bound up so I had to take the bottom bolt out on the cam blades..no real big deal but it can be avoided by having the zip tie tighter.

Now for the real ghetto stuff..ha ha. I for the life of me couldn't get the backbone up. So using some stupid idea I used a "little giant" type ladder I straddled the bike and ran a cargo strap around the top rungs and went to the front backbone and ratched it up until the bike was getting loose on the jack and then put my pry bar under and ..presto!! Not really a recommended process just saying how I did it..ha ha.

Anyways good info and a huge THANK YOU to Phil64 and BBob for the instructions. After I got them instlled I callled the local stealer and he aid it would be approx $700 labor to do it....I took tht 700 bones and powder coated everything ...hell yeah

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah, I really didn't like using the 1 1/16" socket to turn the engine over either. I used it and it did work, but if I were to do another cam install I would either buy the tool or put a bolt into the threaded hole for the timing gear like you did. While the socket worked, I get uncomfortable turning the engine over with the key because you are only contacting the corners of the key and if you were not careful you could round those corners off pretty easily. I also thought about taking an old 12 point 1" socket and cutting a slot in it that would fit the key. I think that would work as well.

I really think that just installing the new cams into the exact same location directly after you remove the old cams would save a lot of steps. You wouldn't have to worry about the cam chains binding up becasue they would never be loose when you turn the engine. And I can't think of any reason why you couldn't do it that way. Just pull the old cam, install the sprocket in the same position on the new cam and re-install with the timing marks in the same location. You wouldn't have to worry about resetting the timing. Just make sure that you torque everything properly when your done and button everything back together and move onto the next cam.

I didn't have the problem splitting the backbone like you did though. Mine came apart with a pry bar just like in PhilC64's instructions.

My best advice to anyone who wanted to do this themselves is to make sure you have everything that you will need before you start. It is frustrating having to stop in the middle of a job to go find a little magnet just to be able to pull a pin out. And it is even more frustrating having to wait more than a week for a stupid gasket just so you can test out the new cams.
 

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I like your write ups.

Yes most defiantly buy all your gaskets a head of time. Mater of fact I'm going to the dealer to see what they care. I have one dealer 2 miles away and he for sure is a maybe the one that would have every thing is 80 miles round trip.
Thanks again for the write up
 

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you guys that have changed the cams, do you get much out of them in the usable power band? i have cammed just about every hd i've owned and honestly in the rpm range i ride in didn't get much bang out of them. i mainly did it on hd's for the sound. when you put pipes and cleaner on one, and s&s carb , the cams really bring out the sound. i rarely get over 3000 rpm though and the extra power just wasn't there at that rpm.
 

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Nice write-up. thumb up

...And it is even more frustrating having to wait more than a week for a stupid gasket ...
Arrr, stupid gasket!
 

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I can't wait to see how the bike runs with the new cams
Unfair advertising. From the title, I thought I was going to be privy to an insane discussion of burnouts, wheelies, and general purpose debauchery.
 

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Unfair advertising. From the title, I thought I was going to be privy to an insane discussion of burnouts, wheelies, and general purpose debauchery.
LOL. That will come as soon as I get the new gasket. I've got to replace my tires soon. I sense some burnouts coming in my future.


Arrr, stupid gasket!
This ^^^^
 

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Anyways good info and a huge THANK YOU to Phil64 and BBob for the instructions. After I got them instlled I callled the local stealer and he aid it would be approx $700 labor to do it....I took tht 700 bones and powder coated everything ...hell yeah

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Got my Cams done by Dealer for $265.00 labor once I gave him PhilC64 instructions on Cam install with out eingine removed. Before I gave them the instructions, I was quoted about the same price of $700. Kutos to all you who were able to do this install yourselfthumb up
 

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you guys that have changed the cams, do you get much out of them in the usable power band? i have cammed just about every hd i've owned and honestly in the rpm range i ride in didn't get much bang out of them. i mainly did it on hd's for the sound. when you put pipes and cleaner on one, and s&s carb , the cams really bring out the sound. i rarely get over 3000 rpm though and the extra power just wasn't there at that rpm.
I can't speak for everyone, but I noticed the most improvement at around 3500 rpm to 5000+. Engine never got wheezy and wanted to keep on going hard and fast all the way through, even at 5000rpm. I believe thats why Lloydz suggest getting the ECS remaped to up the Rev Limiter to around 6000+ to get everything out of the Cams. Some others may have noticed a pickup at lower RPMs. but I have alot of ass to move at 6'4", 280lbs and may need the higher end to get things moving.:D
 

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Assuming a bone stock bike:




Adding stuff like pipes/airbox/fuel controller/cams will improve power from 2500 rpm up. You may even drop a little power below 2500, but once rpm get above 2500 you'll forget all about that little bit of loss. The modifications will extend the usable powerband out to higher rpm, giving a wider usable powerband than stock, although it will move the green zone a couple hundred rpm farther to the right.

As far as cams for sound... wasted effort on a Victory engine. It won't sound any different.



.
 

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I have to ask: Why?
thats just where i like to ride. i do get on it every now and then , but if i get to a higher rpm in anything but first i'm already over the speed limit most places around here. the dealer that used to be in knoxville said get it to 3500 before changes. i tried that one time and got a side full of fingernails for hitting 70 in a 45. it was in either second or third, i don't remember, but the wife wasn't happy with what would be a very bad ticket if caught. you have to remember i have rode hd's for years and they are happy just above idling most of the time.the way you drive is hard to change just because the machine is different. i know the cam's won't help a vic sound, even the cherry bombs just make a louder steady pom pom pom. and an occasional pop that will wake you up when shifting..
 

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Got my Cams done by Dealer for $265.00 labor once I gave him PhilC64 instructions on Cam install with out eingine removed. Before I gave them the instructions, I was quoted about the same price of $700. Kutos to all you who were able to do this install yourselfthumb up
Congrats and it sounds like you have a very good dealer. Will your dealer do the same service for others @ the same price point?
 

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Congrats and it sounds like you have a very good dealer. Will your dealer do the same service for others @ the same price point?
They are some good guys, and have always worked with me on getting things done on my bike with information I have gotten on this forum. I don't see any reason why the price would be any different except they give people who bought their bikes there somewhere between a 5- 10% discount on labor. But I'll ask incase anybody is all the way down here in Corpus Christi, Tx. One thing for sure, and that is order your gaskets that you'll need before you make an appointment. ( The Dealer charged 3.5 hours labor for the job.) May seem a little long for those who install cams on a regular bases, but it was their first time to break the back bone on an XC and install Cams.
 

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I'm flattered by your compliments folks! My entire goal was to get you spinning wrenches and realizing these bike are easy to work on. As I state in my write up, I have to thank BBob for the inspiration.

I am taking your comments regarding the 1 1/16th socket observation and am adding it to the write up. Without input like this, our common knowledge gets stale and static. Never a good thing.

Ride the snot out of your bikes and enjoy the smiles per mile!
 

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.... May seem a little long for those who install cams on a regular bases, but it was their first time to break the back bone on an XC and install Cams.
After I read your comment, I honestly believe the folks at Vic want you to play with these bikes. Why have a split frame and not make a solid frame? Why make the frame so you can come up with some wild fabrication such as Conquest's new Cuda? I think they honestly thought so outside the box, that they included you into the equation.
 
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