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Gas is my motorcycles food and the spark plugs are digestion and I don't like indigestion.












OK I'll stop now.






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The only time I would go with a different plug is if I changed to forced induction, nitrous or a heavily modified bike. I have had no problems at all with the stock plugs.


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The only time I would go with a different plug is if I changed to forced induction, nitrous or a heavily modified bike. I have had no problems at all with the stock plugs.


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Even then I would use oem plugs. if you go real wild with super charger and nitro, you may want to add msd ignition but still use oem plugs.
 

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Most engines actually run worse with anything other than stock plugs. In my opinion, stock plugs is something that should never be swapped out with something other than stock...especially when comparing to split fire type plugs.
See you do not know what it is that you mouth is spewing out.
 

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If you significantly change the AFR hotter or colder plugs may be called for, but the platinum or iridium plugs have nothing to do with plug heat range. They are just another metal for the contacts to be made of or to be coated with. OEM plugs work great for most engines but if you find that your plugs are fouling you might want to go to a higher heat plug. That will reduce the fouling. If you go too hot you risk damaging the piston so don't go there unless you need to.
 

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If you significantly change the AFR hotter or colder plugs may be called for, but the platinum or iridium plugs have nothing to do with plug heat range. They are just another metal for the contacts to be made of or to be coated with. OEM plugs work great for most engines but if you find that your plugs are fouling you might want to go to a higher heat plug. That will reduce the fouling. If you go too hot you risk damaging the piston so don't go there unless you need to.
A hotter spark (if needed) can be had with MSD ignition.

Your logic there at then end...I'm going to have to call you on it.

If you're fouling plugs, it has more to do with A/F ratio than spark plugs. Don't change the type of plugs you use because you're fouled, change your A/F or look for the problem.

A spark plug putting out a hotter spark will NOT damage the piston. While I agree with you that a much hotter combustion can damage a a piston, you're just not going to get that by changing spark plugs. You CAN get that by advancing your timing too far though.
 

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See you do not know what it is that you mouth is spewing out.
hmmm...I thought I did. Let me check real quick, I know I have a few ASE certifications laying around here somewhere...oh here they are. Let's see...Engine Performance...yep got that one...Engine Repair...yep got that one too. Those two cover everything engine related. Thanks though :D
 

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Longer Life?

On my prior bike, a Suzuki Burgman 650, I replaced the stock plugs with NGK Iridium plugs. It was my understanding that these would last longer, is the only reason I used them.

I did this switch to iridium at c. 31,000 on that scoot. The stockers actually looked OK, but I never wanted to do that again: you have to remove a lot of stuff on the bike, get the radiator out of the way, cut your hands on the radiator fins a few times, etc. I didn't notice any performance change, but my strategy did work: I sold the bike without ever having to do that again (although I admit it was before I put another 31K miles on it).

So, a question for those of you who actually know this stuff: not that it's a big deal to change plugs on a Vic, but will using iridium plugs increase the interval between plug changes (because the metal lasts longer, or something)?
 

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A hotter spark (if needed) can be had with MSD ignition.

Your logic there at then end...I'm going to have to call you on it.

If you're fouling plugs, it has more to do with A/F ratio than spark plugs. Don't change the type of plugs you use because you're fouled, change your A/F or look for the problem.

A spark plug putting out a hotter spark will NOT damage the piston. While I agree with you that a much hotter combustion can damage a a piston, you're just not going to get that by changing spark plugs. You CAN get that by advancing your timing too far though.
Hotter plugs have nothing at all to do with a hotter spark. I really don't care about your schooling. A hotter plug has a different ceramic than an original plug so it stays hotter between spark events. That helps it burn off any build up from a plug that would otherwise be fouling. I don't disagree with finding the source of your fouling but as an old 2 stroke guy I know that finding the right heat range on a plug will in fact reduce fouling. I was dealing with oil fouling on my older engines and changing the heat range was a proven way to deal with it. Again a too hot plug, not a hot spark, could in fact lead to a hole in a piston. The balance between too hot and too cold on a plug was critical on those old 2 strokes.
I doubt that ASE courses even address the 2 stroke engines I am talking about. They are no longer sold in the US.
 

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Hotter plugs have nothing at all to do with a hotter spark. I really don't care about your schooling. A hotter plug has a different ceramic than an original plug so it stays hotter between spark events. That helps it burn off any build up from a plug that would otherwise be fouling. I don't disagree with finding the source of your fouling but as an old 2 stroke guy I know that finding the right heat range on a plug will in fact reduce fouling. I was dealing with oil fouling on my older engines and changing the heat range was a proven way to deal with it. Again a too hot plug, not a hot spark, could in fact lead to a hole in a piston. The balance between too hot and too cold on a plug was critical on those old 2 strokes.
I doubt that ASE courses even address the 2 stroke engines I am talking about. They are no longer sold in the US.
I don't care about your 2 strokes ;) ASE is not a course, it's not schooling. It's verification of in shop experience on a testing subject, then a long test of trick questions, with 4 correct answers to a single question where you have to choose the MOST correct answer that only experience can provide in order to weed out all non hackers thumb up In short, it's the only proven way of separating the real professionals from the others.

Seriously, what in the world would 2 stroke performance have to do with our bikes? So you're talking about not delivering a hot spark but rather keeping the plug itself hot?? That's pointless in todays 4 stroke engine. But based on the pointless suggestion, if you did find a plug that stayed too hot, it could do damage. It would basically do the same thing that advancing your timing too far would do. It would pre det, you would also hear it though as you would get spark knock or "pinging".

The 2 strokes are still sold in the US, you're just looking at the wrong brands. Honda doesn't, Kawasaki still has a couple and I believe it's Yamaha...maybe it was Suzuki...one of them, still is mostly two stroke. KTM is another. I looked when I bought my last two dirt bikes a couple months ago. I love me sum 2 stroke. Problem is they are spendy so I ended up with 4 strokes instead.
 

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i run champion plugs in mine because i hate ngk, nothing but problems with them, champ for me runs , starts, and mpg is better.


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Hotter plugs have nothing at all to do with a hotter spark. I really don't care about your schooling. A hotter plug has a different ceramic than an original plug so it stays hotter between spark events. That helps it burn off any build up from a plug that would otherwise be fouling. I don't disagree with finding the source of your fouling but as an old 2 stroke guy I know that finding the right heat range on a plug will in fact reduce fouling. I was dealing with oil fouling on my older engines and changing the heat range was a proven way to deal with it. Again a too hot plug, not a hot spark, could in fact lead to a hole in a piston. The balance between too hot and too cold on a plug was critical on those old 2 strokes.
I doubt that ASE courses even address the 2 stroke engines I am talking about. They are no longer sold in the US.
I'll verify that point too Oldman47,

And add that with a correctly performed "plug chop" as I've detailed elsewhere, if your heat range is correct there'll be a definite line of difference half way along the side electrode.
I just pulled the plugs on that old Valiant we put down the 1/4 mile for a few passes last weekend and it's plugs were in a remarkably good condition, but...they were BP4ES ,Tooo hot a plug for my liking as I did a compression check and all 6 cylinders were 150psi and no sign of oil contamination at all...I was very pleasantly surprised for an engine almost 50 years old, Id guess it's been recoed at some stage, its also blue not orange.
I threw a fresh set of BP5ES set at .040" for the electronic ignition thats been fitted.
If we end up running the old girl at the drags this Sunday for Mopar Sunday then I'll give her a proper plug chop out there.
 

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I don't care about your 2 strokes ;) ASE is not a course, it's not schooling. It's verification of in shop experience on a testing subject, then a long test of trick questions, with 4 correct answers to a single question where you have to choose the MOST correct answer that only experience can provide in order to weed out all non hackers thumb up In short, it's the only proven way of separating the real professionals from the others.

Seriously, what in the world would 2 stroke performance have to do with our bikes? So you're talking about not delivering a hot spark but rather keeping the plug itself hot?? That's pointless in todays 4 stroke engine. But based on the pointless suggestion, if you did find a plug that stayed too hot, it could do damage. It would basically do the same thing that advancing your timing too far would do. It would pre det, you would also hear it though as you would get spark knock or "pinging".

The 2 strokes are still sold in the US, you're just looking at the wrong brands. Honda doesn't, Kawasaki still has a couple and I believe it's Yamaha...maybe it was Suzuki...one of them, still is mostly two stroke. KTM is another. I looked when I bought my last two dirt bikes a couple months ago. I love me sum 2 stroke. Problem is they are spendy so I ended up with 4 strokes instead.
Plugs of a correct heat range are vital whether the engines 2 or 4 stroke
 

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Wesson, if it's really hot out I run Crisco wac
I find the walmart brand "great value" is just as effective.
 

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Plugs of a correct heat range are vital whether the engines 2 or 4 stroke
Correct heat range as in OEM plugs? Id agree lol

I think you may have missed my point. He's talking about switching to a hotter plug due to a 2 stroke oil fouled plug...2 stroke fuel is oil mixed. if you have an oil fouled plug on a 4 stroke engine you don't bandaid it by swapping plugs, you find the problem (because there would be one) and you fix it. there is no need to change from the oem plug...period
 

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Correct heat range as in OEM plugs? Id agree lol

I think you may have missed my point. He's talking about switching to a hotter plug due to a 2 stroke oil fouled plug...2 stroke fuel is oil mixed. if you have an oil fouled plug on a 4 stroke engine you don't bandaid it by swapping plugs, you find the problem (because there would be one) and you fix it. there is no need to change from the oem plug...period
Ive owned quite a few 2 strokes most notably an air cooled RD350 the first disc brake model, also a Suzuki 100 that was thrashed mercilessly getting me to work picking tomatoes.
Too cold a plug on a 2 stroke will foul, simple as that, its a matter of getting the correct plug , not too hot nor too cold.
Then riding the bejesus out of it..as trundling around without a hot enough plug will foul.
Its as much how you ride it as the state of tune and also the ratio the oil is mixed.
Ride it hard and you can go a bit colder on the plug.
Same with a four stroke race engine, colder plugs are good as long as its being thrashed, load it up and it'll fuel foul.
Im sure Oldman47 will verify this too , as to get the best performance out of a two stroke it has to be on the ragged edge of seizing but not.
Thankfully Vics are 4-stroke:)
 

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Ive owned quite a few 2 strokes most notably an air cooled RD350 the first disc brake model, also a Suzuki 100 that was thrashed mercilessly getting me to work picking tomatoes.
Too cold a plug on a 2 stroke will foul, simple as that, its a matter of getting the correct plug , not too hot nor too cold.
Then riding the bejesus out of it..as trundling around without a hot enough plug will foul.
Its as much how you ride it as the state of tune and also the ratio the oil is mixed.
Ride it hard and you can go a bit colder on the plug.
Same with a four stroke race engine, colder plugs are good as long as its being thrashed, load it up and it'll fuel foul.
Im sure Oldman47 will verify this too , as to get the best performance out of a two stroke it has to be on the ragged edge of seizing but not.
Thankfully Vics are 4-stroke:)
The OP is not riding a 2 stroke or a top fuel dragster, nor are the folk cruising down the highway. For all of us...including the OP, OEM plugs are what is best suited for his ride. I'm not sure why some folk insist on going waaaay out in left field with 2 stroke engines and extreme racing engines to try and find something that MAY need a spark plug swapped. I'd bet LLoyd uses OEM plugs in a big bore, supercharged Vic. He may or may not add MSD coil and wires. The OP asked a question and I believe I gave the correct answer. My answer is based on my experience which is quite a lot. I wouldn't rely on most forum members "verifying" much in regards to the topic. Honestly, it doesn't matter to me how many years they been doing it because unless they were doing it in a professional shop for quite some time, my experience has probably passed them by. I don't say that to be rude and I mean nobody here any disrespect. I chose mechanics as my profession and I've done it day in and day out. I've probably diagnosed more performance issues in one single year than most have in a lifetime. That kind of experience you just can't get in a back yard. I point to LLoyd and Rylan as examples, these two guys work on Vics day in and day out. While they are probably young enough to be the grandsons of many members on here, these guys have passed each of us by and they know more about these bikes than all of us, including myself, will ever know. Again, because they do it professionally, every single day. I'm not saying that I won't ever be wrong regarding engine performance and engine repair (which is my area of expertise) but it'll take somebody of some legit credentials to sway me.

I hope this doesn't get interpreted wrong as I don't intend on ruffling anybody's feathers. I don't want a forum argument. cheers
 
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