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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, I bought one, have it a +4 and bike seems to run smoother. ATM I have no other upgrades aside for Victory performace filter and added vents (on my hammer), but hopefully have some hacker pipes coming along with there ams. At this point I'm just setting it and just looking for a result.

I always have no probs installing the stuff, what I really want to know is what is the mechanics and reasoning for the settings? What is it doing and what effects is it having?

Thanks
 

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Just google "advance timing" and you will get all the information you want. People have been messing with timing on their vehicles since there has been vehicles.
 

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Ok, I bought one, have it a +4 and bike seems to run smoother. ATM I have no other upgrades aside for Victory performace filter and added vents (on my hammer), but hopefully have some hacker pipes coming along with there ams. At this point I'm just setting it and just looking for a result.

I always have no probs installing the stuff, what I really want to know is what is the mechanics and reasoning for the settings? What is it doing and what effects is it having?

Thanks
Rylan explains it all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3_RjEdk5ZI
 

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Were is that 24 page tread of Timing Wheel ha ha ... That should do it ?
 

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For the benefit of those reading this thread, to save you looking elsewhere for your answer (as some have directed), here's the "skinny" ...

(following taken from various google searches)

"Timing advance" refers to the number of degrees before top dead center (BTDC) that the spark will ignite the air-fuel mixture in the combustion chamber during the compression stroke. Retarded timing can be defined as changing the timing so that fuel ignition happens later than the manufacturer's specified time.

Ignition timing, in a spark ignition internal combustion engine (ICE), is the process of setting the angle relative to piston position and crankshaft angular velocity that a spark will occur in the combustion chamber near the end of the compression stroke.

The need for advancing the timing of the spark is because fuel does not completely burn the instant the spark fires, the combustion gasses take a period of time to expand, and the angular or rotational speed of the engine can lengthen or shorten the time frame in which the burning and expansion should occur. In a vast majority of cases, the angle will be described as a certain angle advanced before top dead center (BTDC). Advancing the spark BTDC means that the spark is energized prior to the point where the combustion chamber reaches its minimum size, since the purpose of the power stroke in the engine is to force the combustion chamber to expand. Sparks occurring after top dead center (ATDC) are usually counter-productive (producing wasted spark, back-fire, engine knock etc.) unless there is need for a supplemental or continuing spark prior to the exhaust stroke.

Setting the correct ignition timing is crucial in the performance of an engine. Sparks occurring too soon or too late in the engine cycle are often responsible for excessive vibrations and even engine damage. The ignition timing affects many variables including engine longevity, fuel economy, and engine power. Modern engines that are controlled in real time by an engine control unit use a computer to control the timing throughout the engine's RPM and load range. Older engines that use mechanical spark distributors rely on inertia (by using rotating weights and springs) and manifold vacuum in order to set the ignition timing throughout the engine's RPM and load range.

Early cars required the driver to adjust timing via controls according to driving conditions, but this is now automated.

There are many factors that influence proper ignition timing for a given engine. These include the timing of the intake valve(s) or fuel injector(s), the type of ignition system used, the type and condition of the spark plugs, the contents and impurities of the fuel, fuel temperature and pressure, engine speed and load, air and engine temperature, turbo boost pressure or intake air pressure, the components used in the ignition system, and the settings of the ignition system components. Usually, any major engine changes or upgrades will require a change to the ignition timing settings of the engine.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ignition_timing
 

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Unfortunately Rylan doesn't "explain it all" in that vid. What he does explain is what the product is and how to install it and it's effect.

He doesn't fully address the OP's question IMHO which is ... "what is the mechanics and reasoning for the settings? What is it doing and what effects is it having?"
 

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To make it simple.......the bike comes with EPA (retarded government) timing. Lloydz wheel advances the timing where it should be for proper running.
 

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To make it simple.......the bike comes with EPA (retarded government) timing. Lloydz wheel advances the timing where it should be for proper running.
Good explanation! thumb up
 

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Keep in mind the higher you set the ATS (without PCV) and the weather gets above 95 degrees you'll have a better chance of pinging.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks guys. I don't believe I have experienced "ping" on a motorcycle yet, is that the same as a "knock" in autos?
 

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Thanks guys. I don't believe I have experienced "ping" on a motorcycle yet, is that the same as a "knock" in autos?
Some refer to pinging as knocking but really, it's not the same. Knocking is the sound of worn con rod bearings and it really sounds like "knock, knock, knock".

Pinging sounds like little marbles in a metal can rattling around.
 

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Good read Silvrt.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Again, thanks...much more clear on what its doing! thumb up
 

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Good reading but how much to advance the timing?

The Lloydz Timing Wheel comes by default set to 4+. What will the difference if the timing wheel gets setup to 6+? or even higher? What's the real result of this? more HP?
 

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Mine's at 6+ and no pinging. Someone had theirs up to 8+ and ran regular and no pinging. Its not that hard to experiment, maybe 20 minutes to change the setting.
 

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with the wheel at higher than plus 4 and the weather gets above 95 degrees you increase your chance of pinning. You should be using 91 octane gas then.
At plus 4 you can run 89 octane on flat ground or small hills. Mountains and bigger hills you should run 91 octane gas
 

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Is it like... "ping, ping, ping ricochet rabbit"?

Kevin X set mine at +4 same as his bike. I always run premium and told him so, and he says there is nothing to be gained by going beyond +4
 

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im back to 8, no ping so far, not even in my previous trouble spot. going from 4-8 on a dyno gained 2hp,3ftlbs, which isnt much, but it gained response for me, 4-6-8 to me is fairly noticeable differences. i took mine out altogether the other day trying to diagnose a what seems like engine vibration, thought to myself, hmm maybe dont need the wheel, then i put it back in at 8, and thought, what the hell was i thinking!!!
 
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