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Ok all question for all you electricians. I have a 11' w/a ton of battery connections and i would like to eliminate the cluster f**k at the batt terminals. So....was thinking of a power block. Here's a list of what i have going directly to battery now...that I have added.

1. 2 RF 300x2 amps
2. 1 Gerbing heating clothing plug...7A fuse I believe
3. battery tender

What I would like to do is run a + and - power block under my fairing just for the accessories Ive added. My thought is if i run a heavy enough wire to the fuse block, with its own fuse, i can still fuse all the add ons to the bike separately under the fairing eliminating the cluster at the batt terminals....???

Thoughts?

Thanks
 

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On my Venture I had run into the half dozen wires connecting to the battery post thing. Got messy with all that trying to connect @ battery. So I installed one of these fuse blocks under the seat. You should be able to do a similar install under seat. I would fuse the power wire to the block. Aux fuse block. Or you can check out what Joe has over at Cycle Terminals
 

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I have installed a cheap 6 terminal fused block and powered it with a relay between it and the battery, so its activated only when the ignition is on. I fastened it to a vertical support to the right (bike's right) of the battery. Relay sits on top of the battery. Charger pigtail is connected directly to the battery.
 

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Ok all question for all you electricians. I have a 11' w/a ton of battery connections and i would like to eliminate the cluster f**k at the batt terminals. So....was thinking of a power block. Here's a list of what i have going directly to battery now...that I have added.

1. 2 RF 300x2 amps
2. 1 Gerbing heating clothing plug...7A fuse I believe
3. battery tender

What I would like to do is run a + and - power block under my fairing just for the accessories Ive added. My thought is if i run a heavy enough wire to the fuse block, with its own fuse, i can still fuse all the add ons to the bike separately under the fairing eliminating the cluster at the batt terminals....???

Thoughts?3

Thanks
Could you " bridge" the two amps together? That would eliminate one wire, then use
A High Temperature Ring Terminal for the clothing plug and battery tender, eliminating another wire.

Just a suggestion. ...
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
You can watch my Aux Power Block Video here.
.
Paul...I did that's what gave me the idea! My concern are the 2 amp power wires and getting enough power to run them through a power block set up. If I remember correctly, i'm running 8 gauge wire for each as power wire. All the other accessories would easily be able to run through the power block. All of my other add ons I've gone up a size or 2 in wire guage
 

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To save you from reading a really freakin' long document, here's some info I have in my write-up on adding Rivco LED mirrors to an XCT ( Adding Rivco LED Mirrors to a Victory Cross Country Motorcycle ) that I think is relevant to your question.


Battery Terminal Extenders:

I use the Termin-8 for avoiding glomming up the battery terminals. (For completeness, note that I have toothed washers on the battery bolts, and medium thread locker on the bottom half of the bolts, dielectric grease on the top half of the bolts, and the bolts snugged very tightly. Once you add a terminal extender like this, you may never have to mess with the actual battery bolts again.)

I highly recommend the Termin-8, even if it's expensive; it's well made and you don't have to solder anything or crimp any pins, etc. If all you want are some always-on connections (which is what direct connections to the battery result in, if you were to use the battery terminal bolts themselves), these will do the trick.

I use my Termin-8 for juice to a horn relay, and to Powerlet outlet, and some other things. I use the Powerlet outlet (drilled through the left side cover -- see Victory Powerlet in Side Cover , if interested) for two things: heated gear and a smart-charger. I suppose an outlet for heated gear should be an ignition-on-only power source, but once you turn off the bike you're likely to turn off your gear and get off the bike, i.e., so it doesn't really matter if the power source for heated gear is always hot. And if it weren't, you couldn't use the same outlet for a Battery Tender, et al. Another always-on circuit might be an alarm system, for instance.

In any case, here are some extenders. Note that they're all short -- not for under the fairing -- and all have their own fuse protection:

https://www.powerlet.com/product/termin8-easier-than-fuseblock/409 : Powerlet Termin-8
3 Circuit : Eastern Beaver 3-Circuit Solution
Accessory Fused Terminal | Load Equalizers & Adapters | Lighting | Küryakyn : Kuryakyn Accessory Fused Terminal


Fuse Blocks:

If you'll be adding many more circuits, and especially if you want one or more of them to be ignition-on-only (such as extra lights, with or without their own switches), you'll probably want to add a full-fledged fuse block. (I have one set of added lights, but they have their own relay, which is powered by a connection to the Termin-8, but triggered by an ignition-on-only source. If you'll add a lot of such circuits, then a fuse block would eliminate adding a relay for each such circuit.)

IMHO, the placement of a fuse block should be in the vicinity of most of the devices that will be added. This will make for shorter wire runs, and will eliminate having a lot of wires cross the "neck" area of the bike, where you have to allow for necessary slack and avoid pinching wires as the handlebars are turned full lock.

Again IMHO, it should not be necessary to place the fuse block for easy access. Replacing or checking fuses should be an extremely rare occurrence if you wire devices properly. And it takes me less than 10 minutes to take off the fairing, so I'd probably recommend that as a fuse block location.

Here are some fuse blocks:

Home : Arboreal Systems Dispatch 1
http://www.bluesea.com/products/category/ST Blade : Blue Sea Fuse Blocks
Fuse Panels : Centech Fuse Panels
Denali PowerHub2 fuse block, master ground block and wiring harness for motorcycles | TwistedThrottle.com : Denali PowerHub2
PC-8 : Eastern Beaver Power Center 8
http://www.electricalconnection.com/power-distribution/pplate-02202.htm : Electrical Connection Power Plate
FUZEBLOCKS.COM : Fuzeblocks FZ-1
PDM60 | Rowe Electronics : Rowe Electronics PDM60 Power Distribution Module

Also of possible interest might be this ground block, depending on how bare-bones of a fuse block you get (such as the really basic fuse holders available for a few dollars at auto-parts stores). I used this on one of my bikes, and it's a nice accessory for what it's designed to do:

Master Ground Block : Electrical Connection Master Ground Block
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
To save you from reading a really freakin' long document, here's some info I have in my write-up on adding Rivco LED mirrors to an XCT ( Adding Rivco LED Mirrors to a Victory Cross Country Motorcycle ) that I think is relevant to your question.


Battery Terminal Extenders:

I use the Termin-8 for avoiding glomming up the battery terminals. (For completeness, note that I have toothed washers on the battery bolts, and medium thread locker on the bottom half of the bolts, dielectric grease on the top half of the bolts, and the bolts snugged very tightly. Once you add a terminal extender like this, you may never have to mess with the actual battery bolts again.)

I highly recommend the Termin-8, even if it's expensive; it's well made and you don't have to solder anything or crimp any pins, etc. If all you want are some always-on connections (which is what direct connections to the battery result in, if you were to use the battery terminal bolts themselves), these will do the trick.

I use my Termin-8 for juice to a horn relay, and to Powerlet outlet, and some other things. I use the Powerlet outlet (drilled through the left side cover -- see Victory Powerlet in Side Cover , if interested) for two things: heated gear and a smart-charger. I suppose an outlet for heated gear should be an ignition-on-only power source, but once you turn off the bike you're likely to turn off your gear and get off the bike, i.e., so it doesn't really matter if the power source for heated gear is always hot. And if it weren't, you couldn't use the same outlet for a Battery Tender, et al. Another always-on circuit might be an alarm system, for instance.

In any case, here are some extenders. Note that they're all short -- not for under the fairing -- and all have their own fuse protection:

https://www.powerlet.com/product/termin8-easier-than-fuseblock/409 : Powerlet Termin-8
3 Circuit : Eastern Beaver 3-Circuit Solution
Accessory Fused Terminal | Load Equalizers & Adapters | Lighting | Küryakyn : Kuryakyn Accessory Fused Terminal


Fuse Blocks:

If you'll be adding many more circuits, and especially if you want one or more of them to be ignition-on-only (such as extra lights, with or without their own switches), you'll probably want to add a full-fledged fuse block. (I have one set of added lights, but they have their own relay, which is powered by a connection to the Termin-8, but triggered by an ignition-on-only source. If you'll add a lot of such circuits, then a fuse block would eliminate adding a relay for each such circuit.)

IMHO, the placement of a fuse block should be in the vicinity of most of the devices that will be added. This will make for shorter wire runs, and will eliminate having a lot of wires cross the "neck" area of the bike, where you have to allow for necessary slack and avoid pinching wires as the handlebars are turned full lock.

Again IMHO, it should not be necessary to place the fuse block for easy access. Replacing or checking fuses should be an extremely rare occurrence if you wire devices properly. And it takes me less than 10 minutes to take off the fairing, so I'd probably recommend that as a fuse block location.

Here are some fuse blocks:

Home : Arboreal Systems Dispatch 1
http://www.bluesea.com/products/category/ST Blade : Blue Sea Fuse Blocks
Fuse Panels : Centech Fuse Panels
Denali PowerHub2 fuse block, master ground block and wiring harness for motorcycles | TwistedThrottle.com : Denali PowerHub2
PC-8 : Eastern Beaver Power Center 8
http://www.electricalconnection.com/power-distribution/pplate-02202.htm : Electrical Connection Power Plate
FUZEBLOCKS.COM : Fuzeblocks FZ-1
PDM60 | Rowe Electronics : Rowe Electronics PDM60 Power Distribution Module

Also of possible interest might be this ground block, depending on how bare-bones of a fuse block you get (such as the really basic fuse holders available for a few dollars at auto-parts stores). I used this on one of my bikes, and it's a nice accessory for what it's designed to do:

Master Ground Block : Electrical Connection Master Ground Block

Can't thank you enough for the advice. I read your write up on installing the mirror w/turn signals...great job btw! Thanks!!!

So I looked at the power block option which i like a lot better. If i ran say a 6 guage batt wire to the power block....https://www.bluesea.com/products/5025/ST_Blade_Fuse_Block_-_6_Circuits_with_Negative_Bus_and_Cover.... I should be good to go for powering up everything including my amps?
 

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Can't thank you enough for the advice. I read your write up on installing the mirror w/turn signals...great job btw! Thanks!!!

So I looked at the power block option which i like a lot better. If i ran say a 6 guage batt wire to the power block....https://www.bluesea.com/products/5025/ST_Blade_Fuse_Block_-_6_Circuits_with_Negative_Bus_and_Cover.... I should be good to go for powering up everything including my amps?
6 gauge wire is probably overkill. If you google something such as automotive wire gauge amp rating you'll find a lot of charts and so forth.

Here are some charts (and the first two are identical, or nearly so):

Wire Gauge Amps Ratings for 12 volt Automotive Systems
https://www.tessco.com/yts/industry/products/itm/automotive/get_wired.html
https://www.crcorp.com/DCT_HardwareEssentials/E/pdf/E11.pdf

This site has a nice wire-gauge calculator, including your specifying the percentage drop:

Wire Size Calculator

All those sites have nice reading material on this topic.

Regarding that Blue Sea block, that's really beefy. I don't have any personal experience with that block, but if it can't handle your needs than nothing will (and your needs certainly aren't extravagant). Most fuse blocks have a 20- or 30-amp limit per circuit, and often something like a 60-amp (or less) overall limit. Don't forget: that resettable bus fuse (the one buried behind framework, up front, on the left side of the bike) for the whole bike (stock) is only 40 amps.

Bottom line: I think you'll be fine using 10- or even 12-gauge wire for the main power hook-up to a fuse block, and that Blue Sea or many of the others (e.g., Centech is a very commonly used block) should be fine.
 
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