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Discussion Starter #1
Hello again everyone.

Quick question: To preload the rear suspension, is it wise to purchase Vic's part number for the spanner wrench or will any one do?

Any tips on this process is welcome as well. Mainly because in the manual it is stated to measure the clearance with both riders on the bike, and an assistant to measure the clearance. Well....I have no assistant. My assistant will be my passenger=no one to measure. This is my conundrum.

thx.
J
 

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Ask your wife to measure from the bottom edge of the fender to the ground (middle of the fender side) with you standing over the bike holding it straight up. Then have your wife sit on the bike with you and stand it up again. While both of you are on the bike ask your wife to measure from the same spot on the fender to the ground.

Subract the loaded height from the loaded height and then measure your clearance in between the fender and your tire. The difference between loaded and unloaded height will be the same as the difference between loaded and unloaded measurements between your fender and tire.

Note that you may have to "wag" a little; if you can't get a measuring device (ruler, tape measure, etc) between your fender and tire see how many fingers it is instead.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Perfect...thanks Ammo.

Any ideas on the wrench?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
For those who might encounter this as I did:

The part number that Victory lists in the manual is a 60 dollar tool from a Vic dealer. Seems kinda steep for a 6" flat piece of metal. My dealer had a universal wrench that LOOKS like it will fit for 30. I will try it tonight and report back the manufacturer and part number. I think its good to go though.
 

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It's worth trying but I suggest putting rags around anything close enough to get smacked if the wrench slips off. It would suck like hell to get a ding, dent, or gouge on your fancy new ride!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's worth trying but I suggest putting rags around anything close enough to get smacked if the wrench slips off. It would suck like hell to get a ding, dent, or gouge on your fancy new ride!
Not only that, but the manual suggests to spray a "light lubricant", so things must be covered. Can't have that getting on the belt. I've already had bad visions of that thing slipping off too.

Is it me or does this seem kind of a hoaky way to accomplish this? I mean I'm not going to be riding with someone all the time. To keep adjusting it back and forth will most likely result in it staying in the preloaded position.

Thanks ammo
 

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Discussion Starter #8
try this link for the spanner tool for victory shock

http://store.barracudacustom.com/Victory_Rear_Shock_Preload_Spring_Adjustment_Tool_p/vt-101.htm Its about 50 bucks and a hefty tool not a 6 " wrench . Mike
Hi Mike. Thanks for that, but that's not what I was talking about. If you search for Vic's part number (from the manual) you will find this:



Located here: http://polaris.spx.com/Detail.aspx?id=363&cat=5

You will see it costs 30 bones and can only be purchased by a Polaris dealer. This is the part the was quoted 60 bucks.

The one you provided:
looks worth the price, and I agree...looks to be a hefty tool. However...it is NOT the Victory part they list.

The one I bought was this:

While not quite as hefty, it was available, and fairly inexpensive. I will most likely order the one you provided as it looks like a better tool than the other two. What I don't like about Vic's wrench is 1) It's $60 for something that doesn't look nearly the tool as yours. 2)There is a square hole to where it looks to be the receiving end of a ratchet head. Now would I be better off using a rubber coated handled tool, or a bare metal handled tool? I'm going with the first choice, as Ammo pointed out...if that thing slips off, I would rather have a rubber handle than a bare metal ratchet handle flying around. Again, this seems like a hoaky way to accomplish this, but I know it's the way it's been done for a long time, so it can't be that bad can it?

Had I known that this was going to be an issue to find, I would have ordered the right one, or a at least a better one, a week ago. The one I picked up looks like a harbor freight special and most likely won't last two uses without that rivet snapping. Hindsight and all.....

Please don't think I don't appreciate your input, because I do. Fact of the matter is they want to charge me twice the cost price for, in my opinion, less of a tool. The one you provided looks better than both and I will be ordering that one.

thanks again man.
 

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This is the one I bought years ago. It was only $14 at the time.

Tool Number: PV-46993 Essential
Tool Name: SPRING PRELOAD SPANNER WRENCH
Your Price (USD): $24.50
Application: Victory

Works better for me than the side grab type above. Also works well as an engine crankshaft rotation tool when changing cams and doing timing.... lol
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I do like that better than the offset grip
 

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Junk,
The articulating model you picked should work fine and will most likely last for years. The Vic recommended tool would be conveinient in tight spaces because you can alter the angle of the handle (i.e. breaker bar or ratchet) but convience isn't really worth the extra $$ to most people. Just a word of advise; sometimes it takes a good bit of @$$ to turn the adjustment collar so you may want to find a piece of pipe with large enough inner diameter for the handle of your tool to fit in. It may sound goofy because you would be extending the tool thereby increasing your chances of impact on the bike but in reality it is entirely the opposite. With more leverage you can turn the collar easier and control any sudden release as it ramps up/down.

Have fun and play around a little; you'll be surprised how much difference shock adjustment can make. Remember that smooth ride may mean decreased handling and rough ride may mean increased handling. You goal should be to find a setting that is comfortable as well as safe.

By the way if it makes you feel better I've broken a lot of Craftsman handtools and gave up on them. I stick mainly with Harbor Freight (HF) handtools because I haven't broken one yet. Unfortuantely the same rule doesn't apply for power tools; it's a good thing HF has a good warranty because I feel like I won the lottery any time I can get a HF power tool last more than a year.
 

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Junk,
Have fun and play around a little; you'll be surprised how much difference shock adjustment can make. Remember that smooth ride may mean decreased handling and rough ride may mean increased handling. You goal should be to find a setting that is comfortable as well as safe.
Very note worthy Ammo. I don't think it is my mind playing tricks (or it could be) but I found that after adjusting my mono that I did two more 1/2 turns and found a noticiable differnce in that "fine tuning". Deffinately found that while my ride was originally smoother, I did not feel as good in the low leans on the s curves to and from work every day. The are hard long curves around 45 avg speed and after those two adjustments it did seem to feel more solid as I rolled from one side to another. So, just wanted to emphisise the fine tuning being worth the time. Of course I would love to be riding the 10's or better to feel the differnece.. hehe :D
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Very good info Ammo...as usual.

So to report in...turns out the joke is on me. The wrench I picked will not work. Here's why:

If you look at the pic of my tool, then look at the pic of Vic's part number (the CAD looking pic), you will notice that the arm that extends around the collar tapers and gets thinner toward the "hook". Well there is a reason for this, and is something I didn't even notice until I tried to use the tool I got. There is VERY little room to get anything in and around the collar...necessitating the need for a thinner tool. So bam! I had to order the Vic tool. Also, because of the limited space to work in, I believe Ammo hit it spot on when he suggested the design of Vic's part was to facilitate different positions to be able to move the tool, or at least whatever interface you use to insert into the receiving end of the wrench. So ratchet, breaker bar, whatever is used...you can position it properly to get the job done. I might have been able to remove the battery to be able to get my tool in there, but there is a right way and a wrong way to do things. I believe that would be the wrong way to do this. Not to mention the fact that I do believe a breaker bar is necessary...an most likely a hell of a lot easier...to both unlock the locking collar, and turn the adjusting collar.

I'll get this done...eventually ;), and will report back with the results. They sure don't make this easy.

Tim...thanks for the heads up on the little adjustments. I was unaware that such a small turn would make that much of a difference. Also I know what you're saying about lack of Vic product at Vic dealers. AZ Victory doesn't have this part in stock, although it seems to me that you would think it would be more popular. The dealer I bought my bike from didn't even have passenger parts in stock (seat, sissy bar, pegs). Kinda strange I think. If you're going to sell Vic stuff, better have Vic product on hand.
 

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Live and learn Mr. Junk.

To be honest the first time I tried to adjust the mono shock on my V-Star I tried to use the wrench that came in the tool kit. It was a 2 piece design with the 2nd piece being a handle and assembled it was about 6" long. That was such a huge pain in the butt! The only way I could get the wrench to contact good enough to actually turn the collar was to remove the dog bones (suspension links) and jack the bike up. This allowed the rear wheel to stay on the floor which created enough room for a small childs hand to reach the shock. Since I have hands like baseball mitts I also had to pull the rear fender off to get to the damn thing. After thinking a minute I pulled out the shock tool for my ATV (which is a short version of the Vic tool), put a couple of 6" long 3/8" extensions on it and adjusted the shock from the top. Doing it that way I could leave everything on except the seat and an access cover. That changed shock adjustments from 30 minutes of hell and scraped knuckles to 5 minutes of easy work.

Hey on your photo thread you asked if anyone needed some edit work. Can you mock up a stock photo of an XR (Crimson if possible) with some graphics? It may sound a little fruity but it would be awesome if you can do a Mickey Mouse theme. This would keep the wife happy; if it weren't for her getting interested in riding I would still be wishing I had a Victory. She suggested looking for a new bike and when your wife tells you that you need a new bike arguing is really not a good option!
 

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Live and learn...
All too true Ammo. But you know what? That's the best way to learn. I don't mind asking questions, and getting great answers. But to me, the best way to learn is to just dig in and do it. There is no substitution for experience.

I like your idea about the graphics. I'll get working on that. There were a couple other ideas thrown around in that thread that I'm really anxious to work on, as well as yours. Don't worry a bit about it sounding too fruity. I am the last person to judge tastes and preferences. I'll get cracking on it. Probably have that, and maybe the others done by next weekend.

I have to go ride right now
 
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