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Discussion Starter #1
One of the grocery stores here have prime rib on sale for $6.97 a pound. So I picked up 2 roast about 6 pounds each to cook later this winter. I love prime rib and have cooked it deferent ways. I've completely cooked them in the smoker. I have smoked them for a couple of hours then put them in the oven to finish cooking them. One of these roast I'm going to do them completely in the oven. The method I'm going to use is start the cooking the roast at 450 degrees for 15 minutes. This sears the out side of the roast and keeps the moisture in. Then complete the cooking at 325 degrees using a electronic thermometer that you leave in the roast while it cooks. It has an alarm that tells you your at the desired temperature you want. to be at for rare, medium etc. Does anyone have any suggestions on seasoning, rubs etc. I want to try something deferent and I would like to have a good crust on the outside of the roast.
 

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Best rub is simple, kosher salt and cracked black pepper. The kosher salt will aid in creating a crust that will help hold in the juices. Or:

  • 1⁄4 cup ground black pepper (coarse)
  • 1⁄4 cup kosher salt
  • 1⁄4 cup garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1⁄4 cup onion powder
  • 2 tablespoons msg (can omit, do not substitute with meat tenderizer)
  • 2 tablespoons seasoning salt (Johnny Seasoning)
  • 1 tablespoon celery salt
 

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I sear mine in a skillet, then roast at 250. Let it get to room temperature before roasting. Pepper the outside, no salt.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Best rub is simple, kosher salt and cracked black pepper. The kosher salt will aid in creating a crust that will help hold in the juices. Or:

  • 1⁄4 cup ground black pepper (coarse)
  • 1⁄4 cup kosher salt
  • 1⁄4 cup garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1⁄4 cup onion powder
  • 2 tablespoons msg (can omit, do not substitute with meat tenderizer)
  • 2 tablespoons seasoning salt (Johnny Seasoning)
  • 1 tablespoon celery salt
That sounds like it would be a good rub.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I sear mine in a skillet, then roast at 250. Let it get to room temperature before roasting. Pepper the outside, no salt.
That's the way my mother use to cook roast, but she would use salt also.
 

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That's the way my mother use to cook roast, but she would use salt also.
I use to use salt too, but I saw an article saying it draws moisture from the meat. I'm doing one for Christmas and figured I'd try no salt. If it sucks, I'll do another.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I use to use salt too, but I saw an article saying it draws moisture from the meat. I'm doing one for Christmas and figured I'd try no salt. If it sucks, I'll do another.
Let me no the results.
 

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I used to brine turkey's before slow cooking them in the smoker. They do add more moisture but it also depends on the brand of turkey. How they were raised and on what does matter.

Never tried it with beef or pork but it could be a fun experiment. Probably need to go much lighter on the salt content in the water.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I used to brine turkey's before slow cooking them in the smoker. They do add more moisture but it also depends on the brand of turkey. How they were raised and on what does matter.

Never tried it with beef or pork but it could be a fun experiment. Probably need to go much lighter on the salt content in the water.
These rib roast are Black Angus and cost about 40 dollars each on sale. Regular cost would have been around 75 dollars each. I would use a cheaper cut of meet to experiment with brining one. They use to preserve meat by storing it in crock jars filled with brine water. They would have to soak the meat in clear water and rinse it to get the salt out of it. I remember them curing pork when I was a kid in New Mexico. Mother would soak the meat in pure clear water and rinse it before cooking it to get much of the salt out. My dad would always use Morton's sugar cure, but all cures were salt based.
 

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...The method I'm going to use is start the cooking the roast at 450 degrees for 15 minutes. This sears the out side of the roast and keeps the moisture in. Then complete the cooking at 325 degrees using a electronic thermometer that you leave in the roast while it cooks...
Use the same method when I do a whole/half loin filet but drop to 300 and take it out when thermometer says medium rare. Let it 'rest for a 10-15 minutes and..........eeeyummmmm!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Use the same method when I do a whole/half loin filet but drop to 300 and take it out when thermometer says medium rare. Let it 'rest for a 10-15 minutes and..........eeeyummmmm!
The electric coop magazine here put a recipe in it for a loin. It was originally published in magazine in the 50's. Need to take a look at it. They had a recipe for tamales this month that I cut out and saved. Tamales are very popular and a big thing at Christmas. I'm going to try my hand at it sometime after the first of the year. Our Christmas meal this year will be Mexican food. Tamales, enchilada casserole, Mexican rice refried beans and I may have a bowl of menudo for breakfast Christmas morning.
 

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Best rub is simple, kosher salt and cracked black pepper. The kosher salt will aid in creating a crust that will help hold in the juices. Or:

  • 1⁄4 cup ground black pepper (coarse)
  • 1⁄4 cup kosher salt
  • 1⁄4 cup garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1⁄4 cup onion powder
  • 2 tablespoons msg (can omit, do not substitute with meat tenderizer)
  • 2 tablespoons seasoning salt (Johnny Seasoning)
  • 1 tablespoon celery salt
Ditch the salt; none of us old farts need more salt. Poke half a dozen holes in with a thin bladed knife like a boning knife, and push a peeled clove of garlic into each, rub with coarse cracked black pepper, do a hot initial 10 minutes over flame, 5 minutes each side, wood or gas BBQ, to sear the outside, then cut back the heat and slow roast with the the BBQ lid down. Take it out when you have to push the boning knife about half way to the middle to get it to bleed, rest it for 10 minutes.
Invite me over to sample it! I'll bring the beer.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ditch the salt; none of us old farts need more salt. Poke half a dozen holes in with a thin bladed knife like a boning knife, and push a peeled clove of garlic into each, rub with coarse cracked black pepper, do a hot initial 10 minutes over flame, 5 minutes each side, wood or gas BBQ, to sear the outside, then cut back the heat and slow roast with the the BBQ lid down. Take it out when you have to push the boning knife about half way to the middle to get it to bleed, rest it for 10 minutes.
Invite me over to sample it! I'll bring the beer.
That's the way I cooked my first rib roast. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I ordered a new electronic thermometer yesterday on Amazon. A TermoPro TP-17 DAUL PROB it has good reviews and has a good price. I researched it for a few days and decided on this TermoPro, all of their products had good reviews. So I guess it will prime rip for New Years. The thermometer is suppose to be delivered by 9:00 am tomorrow.
 

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...Tamales are very popular and a big thing at Christmas...
Tomorrow evening the Mrs and I will be headed to our neighbors for the traditional Italian Christmas eve Feast Of The Seven Fishes.
 

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I'll be pan searing the Prime rib followed by roasting at 225 degrees. I'll make the ah jus to go with it.

New years eve will be steamed lobsters.
 

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I ordered a new electronic thermometer yesterday on Amazon. A TermoPro TP-17 DAUL PROB it has good reviews and has a good price. I researched it for a few days and decided on this TermoPro, all of their products had good reviews. So I guess it will prime rip for New Years. The thermometer is suppose to be delivered by 9:00 am tomorrow.
Can you leave these probes in the meat, like in a bbq or smoker, and have the leads run out to the LCD display on the outside so it can be monitored without opening and closing the bbq or smoker which lets out a lot of heat? If so; I think this would be great. Especially toward the end of the cooking process.

With the pork shoulders I regularly cook in the smoker; I like to see the temp get over 200 on the inside so I use a regular analog thermometer but of course I have to open the door twice. Once to put it in the meat and once to to remove it 30 seconds later.

It would be cool to insert these probes when I put the meat into smoker then know by the temp when it was done. I'm assuming the sensors are on the very tip of the probes. Is that correct?

 

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Discussion Starter #19
That's what I ordered put with 2 probs. You leave it in the meat through the whole cooking process The probe has a 40 inch cord .
 

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Put mine on the smoker a couple hours ago and I have about 3 more hours to go. The picture is when it when on.

250888
 
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