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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've owned 39 motorcycles in 45 years of riding, but never yet a Victory. I am really attracted to the simplicity and styling of the Vegas 8-Ball, but have a few questions before I sell my current ride (highly customized Honda VTX 1800 Retro)





to get one, so I thought I'd ask current actual owners:

- Victory even after 14 years has a very small market share. I keep hearing that there are very few dealerships, so pricing tends to be less competitive for bikes, parts, and service. True or not?

- I've heard that finding a Victory dealer when you need one when touring can be hard. True or not? Do non-Victory dealers readily, and competently, work on Victorys?

- I've heard that many Victory parts are often backordered for long periods of time, and so bikes stay unrideable for weeks or months. True or not?

- Every model of any brand of motorcycles has its weaknesses. For example, on my 2002 VTX 1800 Retro, the original fuel pressure regulator is known to be failure prone, so you replace it BEFORE it sfails and fills the enigne crankcase with fuel. What are the common weaknesses on a Vegas 8 Ball? For example, I've heard that the transmissions are not only clunky but sometimes actually break. True?

- Every model of any brand of motorcycle has its idiosyncrasies. For example, on the VTX 1800, the factory air-fuel ratio between 1800 and 2300 rpm is "off" (maybe for emissions compliance?), and requires correction via a Power Commander to eliminate a resultant "shaking" when cruising in that rpm range. What are the idiosyncrasies on a Vegas 8 Ball?

- I rode a Vegas 8 Ball yesterday, and it struck me as remarkably light and nimble (part of that due to my current ride being so big and heavy I'm sure). The 8 Ball sort of reminded me of a 1970 Norton 750 Roadster I owned back in the day - that too was a very nimble and small bike, and STILL one of my favorites of all the bikes I've owned. Is the Vegas 8 Ball physically (not engine displacement) the same overall size as other Victory cruiser (not touring or bagger) models like the Hammer, Jackpot, etc., or is it physically smaller?

- I like the fact that the 8 Ball has hydraulic lifters, so no valve adjustments needed, and no engine coolant changes needed either. What engine maintenance is required beyond oil and filter changes, air filters, and spark plugs?

- My local dealership in Austin, Texas has NO new OR used 8 Balls, and is playing games on the value of my potential trade. Does anyone know of a FAIR dealership in central Texas, that keeps inventory of used 8 Balls?

Jim G
 

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When I lived in Texas a few years ago Napalm on 620 (near lakeview mall) had a pretty good rep for service, but I never bought there.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
When I lived in Texas a few years ago Napalm on 620 (near lakeview mall) had a pretty good rep for service, but I never bought there.
They ARE excellent on service, and have good service prices, and in fact are THE place to get new tires, but their idea of sale prices on their bikes versus trade-in value on yours are, to say the least, too one-sided.

I've tired twice in the past few years to buy a bike there, and got turned right off each time and bought something else elsewhere. I DO get at least some of my service work done there on my Honda, and the rest of the service work goes to a really neat local "chopper" shop that does things right too.

Jim G
 

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Napalm Motorsports is where I bought my 2008 Kingpin Tour. I'm sure I could have gotten a better deal from an individual, but a midnight cherry in this good a condition does not come along every day. They are much better to work with than my local dealership. When I need parts I will order them from Napalm.
 

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Take a ride to Killeen Powersports in Killeen, you might be happy with them. I have bought many bikes from them starting in 78. They are a great group of people. If you want to PM me I can tell you who to see! I do not know their current inventory but, I just got a jackpot & my friend got a highball.


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Discussion Starter #6
Take a ride to Killeen Powersports in Killeen, you might be happy with them. I have bought many bikes from them starting in 78. They are a great group of people. If you want to PM me I can tell you who to see! I do not know their current inventory but, I just got a jackpot & my friend got a highball.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
I will keep that in mind! Thank-you!

Jim G
 

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I've owned 39 motorcycles in 45 years of riding, but never yet a Victory. I am really attracted to the simplicity and styling of the Vegas 8-Ball, but have a few questions before I sell my current ride (highly customized Honda VTX 1800 Retro)





to get one, so I thought I'd ask current actual owners:

- Victory even after 14 years has a very small market share. I keep hearing that there are very few dealerships, so pricing tends to be less competitive for bikes, parts, and service. True or not?

- I've heard that finding a Victory dealer when you need one when touring can be hard. True or not? Do non-Victory dealers readily, and competently, work on Victorys?

- I've heard that many Victory parts are often backordered for long periods of time, and so bikes stay unrideable for weeks or months. True or not?

- Every model of any brand of motorcycles has its weaknesses. For example, on my 2002 VTX 1800 Retro, the original fuel pressure regulator is known to be failure prone, so you replace it BEFORE it sfails and fills the enigne crankcase with fuel. What are the common weaknesses on a Vegas 8 Ball? For example, I've heard that the transmissions are not only clunky but sometimes actually break. True?

- Every model of any brand of motorcycle has its idiosyncrasies. For example, on the VTX 1800, the factory air-fuel ratio between 1800 and 2300 rpm is "off" (maybe for emissions compliance?), and requires correction via a Power Commander to eliminate a resultant "shaking" when cruising in that rpm range. What are the idiosyncrasies on a Vegas 8 Ball?

- I rode a Vegas 8 Ball yesterday, and it struck me as remarkably light and nimble (part of that due to my current ride being so big and heavy I'm sure). The 8 Ball sort of reminded me of a 1970 Norton 750 Roadster I owned back in the day - that too was a very nimble and small bike, and STILL one of my favorites of all the bikes I've owned. Is the Vegas 8 Ball physically (not engine displacement) the same overall size as other Victory cruiser (not touring or bagger) models like the Hammer, Jackpot, etc., or is it physically smaller?

- I like the fact that the 8 Ball has hydraulic lifters, so no valve adjustments needed, and no engine coolant changes needed either. What engine maintenance is required beyond oil and filter changes, air filters, and spark plugs?

- My local dealership in Austin, Texas has NO new OR used 8 Balls, and is playing games on the value of my potential trade. Does anyone know of a FAIR dealership in central Texas, that keeps inventory of used 8 Balls?

Jim G
Victory started with the V92. Yes one bike. What you see today is relatively new. After the V92 they produced some 100 ci bikes but never really started pushing bikes until the intro of the 106ci
So considering how long they been giving a good selection of bikes to choose from, they have grown very fast.

Victory has now sold more than 100,000 bikes.
There is a Victory app that shows where all the dealers are in the USA and Canada..

All Victorys made today use the same motor and tranny. The non touring bikes all basically the same bike size wise. The bigger bikes like the x bikes are bigger and heavier. The Vision is different again. Both the vision and x bikes have there own frame.

I have also herd the stories of some poor guy needing service and waiting weeks for a part. I believe that has improved.

As far as week points..... Hmmm ... There really isn't anything that stands out as a common issue on these bikes. Some have had issues other have not. My bike had a rough idle and stall condition just off idle. No one else seemed to have that issue.

If you want to see just how tough these bikes are...... Just take a look at all the Victory Police Bike vids there are on youtube ... They beat the living **** out of those bikes over and over. There is even a vid of the cops riding off road and jumping the bikes. Riding up and down steps and doing it fast and hard... You will not find any other company standing in front of motor cops telling them that Victory is the toughest most reliable bike on the market..
You really need to check it out........

Like you I have had many many bikes over the years. My last bike a Suzuki C90. Nice bike with one big issue..... The charging system could and would let you down.. I made some changes to the regulator for more reliability but you really never knew if or when it would fail. I had to carry a stator with me at all times.... Friends were having issues with there Japanese bikes too. Seemed Japanese quality was falling off. I knew it was time for a change......

I was out with some friends on there Japanese bikes and I have to tell you there is NO COMPARISON.. I didn't realize just how much better a motorcycle the Vic is over what the Japenese have to offer..

This sounds snobby but being on a Victory puts you in a completely different class. The handling, comfort and cool looks are a step above. There is nothing els out there that stands out in a crowd like the Vic's do....

Check out the vids.
Ps I was talking to a motor cop. He was on a Victory Cross Country. He said he hopes he never has to go back to a Harley........
 

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I bought one of the first XRs Portland and when sealing the deal, the salesman asked if I wanted the extended warranty. I told him I had been lurking on the forums and no one was complaining about breakdowns or service problems and I didn't think I'd get my money's worth out of that warranty. He replied that I was right, I'd just be throwing $$$ at him as all they see Victorys for are accessories and routine maintenance. I got mine in March of 2010, more than three years ago, and they haven't seen my bike except for the 500 service. There's over 14K on the clock and no issues or complaints. Still on the original tires.
I did do one thing to overcome a "weakness" as you put it; I installed EBC HH pads in the front for much better braking performance. Can't say much for the originals.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I bought one of the first XRs Portland and when sealing the deal, the salesman asked if I wanted the extended warranty. I told him I had been lurking on the forums and no one was complaining about breakdowns or service problems and I didn't think I'd get my money's worth out of that warranty. He replied that I was right, I'd just be throwing $$$ at him as all they see Victorys for are accessories and routine maintenance. I got mine in March of 2010, more than three years ago, and they haven't seen my bike except for the 500 service. There's over 14K on the clock and no issues or complaints. Still on the original tires.
I did do one thing to overcome a "weakness" as you put it; I installed EBC HH pads in the front for much better braking performance. Can't say much for the originals.
Thanks for this info!

Jim G
 

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Thanks for this info!

Jim G
You're welcome. Many who are contemplating a Victory have come on this forum asking about reliability, especially H-D folks. I was one back then and like those others, I learned that there's nothing to worry about, just ride it and do the regular maintenance and it'll reward you with years of good service. cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No one has commented on parts availability. I had heard some stories that concerned me, about people waiting weeks or months for replacement parts, for both mechanical issues and for repairs after a fall or accident.

True or not?

Jim G
 

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Don't crash and you won't need replacement parts. :)
 

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Many motorsports multiline dealers do not stock much. Oil and filters, common replacement stuff and some high mark up geegaws.

It's common to expect a week or maybe more for ordered replacement parts, sometimes many weeks for catalogue optional bolt on stuff.

If you are looking for an Achilles heel in Victory then the point where the dealer and the customer meet is that heel. The bad news is that Victory has not policed the dealer network to a standard that riders who rely on dealers would like. There are good dealers out there but there are enough mediocre ones to taint the pool.
The further bad news is that the factory does not seem responsive to the concept of secondary sales after the primary sale. Parts delivery and accessibility issues have resulted in some horror stories from dissatisfied owners that ordered parts and waited and waited.

The good news is that the need for dealers after the purchase of the bike is more a matter of wanting dealer service than needing dealer service. The bikes are as bulletproof as anything on two wheels, more so than most. There are odd parts needs but not often. Most routine maintenance can be done in the shade of a tree and dealers keep maintenance items in stock if you choose to rely on them for maintenance.
There is not a large aftermarket but there is one. Unlike Harleys which can be entirely built out of aftermarket parts, you have to have a Victory to customize a Victory. That said, personalization with bolt ons is not hard to do. The aftermarket vendors for Victory tend to be accessible through phone and email and are customer satisfaction driven so they are backfilling as best they can for a fault in the Polaris product delivery model.

If you are local to a dealer with a good rep then you have basically eliminated the biggest complaint about Vics. That doesn't mean that the issues with the factory keeping enough shelf stock are resolved but a dealer that values the motorcycle owner is better at rattling factory cages than a dealer that is focused on moving bikes.

Couple of other thoughts.
1. Pop has haggled over a couple of bikes through the years. I can say that my 2012 Cross Country Tour bought almost exactly one year ago today was the best bang for the buck purchase I ever made on a new bike. I got many thousands off MSRP and the machine has been without issue. So, reports of less than competitive pricing are, I think, functions of your willingness to shop around and to hold the line on what you will pay. If that means travelling to where the deals are, so be it. You can pay MSRP but you don't have to.
2. Manuals are available online. I read that the factory is offering them for download, and I know that one member of this board BBob has done a great service by compiling them all and if you hunt around for his posts he links to them in his sig line. I would suggest getting a copy of the manual for the Vegas and digging in. It's a dry read but it's info and some of your questions will be answered in it.
 

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I have become a fan of the Victory bikes. I bought my first one in the fall of 2005.

I have had 3 Victory's now and have ridden a little over 100,000 miles on them and I have never had a breakdown on them.

Of the 100,000 miles, I have ridden 35,815 miles while doing an IBA ride. Over 1/3 of the miles were "on the clock" while doing some of what I think were some extreme IBA rides. I have 16 certificates of 14 IBA rides.

The rides have taken me to all 50 states and from Key West to the top of Alaska and never a breakdown.

I like them!thumb up

http://www.victorymotorcycles.com/en-us/community/story/vision-rider-steve-rolland-iron-butt



.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Many motorsports multiline dealers do not stock much. Oil and filters, common replacement stuff and some high mark up geegaws.

It's common to expect a week or maybe more for ordered replacement parts, sometimes many weeks for catalogue optional bolt on stuff.

If you are looking for an Achilles heel in Victory then the point where the dealer and the customer meet is that heel. The bad news is that Victory has not policed the dealer network to a standard that riders who rely on dealers would like. There are good dealers out there but there are enough mediocre ones to taint the pool.
The further bad news is that the factory does not seem responsive to the concept of secondary sales after the primary sale. Parts delivery and accessibility issues have resulted in some horror stories from dissatisfied owners that ordered parts and waited and waited.

The good news is that the need for dealers after the purchase of the bike is more a matter of wanting dealer service than needing dealer service. The bikes are as bulletproof as anything on two wheels, more so than most. There are odd parts needs but not often. Most routine maintenance can be done in the shade of a tree and dealers keep maintenance items in stock if you choose to rely on them for maintenance.
There is not a large aftermarket but there is one. Unlike Harleys which can be entirely built out of aftermarket parts, you have to have a Victory to customize a Victory. That said, personalization with bolt ons is not hard to do. The aftermarket vendors for Victory tend to be accessible through phone and email and are customer satisfaction driven so they are backfilling as best they can for a fault in the Polaris product delivery model.

If you are local to a dealer with a good rep then you have basically eliminated the biggest complaint about Vics. That doesn't mean that the issues with the factory keeping enough shelf stock are resolved but a dealer that values the motorcycle owner is better at rattling factory cages than a dealer that is focused on moving bikes.

Couple of other thoughts.
1. Pop has haggled over a couple of bikes through the years. I can say that my 2012 Cross Country Tour bought almost exactly one year ago today was the best bang for the buck purchase I ever made on a new bike. I got many thousands off MSRP and the machine has been without issue. So, reports of less than competitive pricing are, I think, functions of your willingness to shop around and to hold the line on what you will pay. If that means travelling to where the deals are, so be it. You can pay MSRP but you don't have to.
2. Manuals are available online. I read that the factory is offering them for download, and I know that one member of this board BBob has done a great service by compiling them all and if you hunt around for his posts he links to them in his sig line. I would suggest getting a copy of the manual for the Vegas and digging in. It's a dry read but it's info and some of your questions will be answered in it.
GREAT reply, Pop! Very helpful and explanatory. Thank-you!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I have become a fan of the Victory bikes. I bought my first one in the fall of 2005.

I have had 3 Victory's now and ridden a little over 100,000 miles on them and I have never had a breakdown on them.

Of the 100,000 miles I have ridden 35,815 miles while doing on IBA ride. Over 1/3 of the miles were "on the clock" while doing some of what I think were some extreme IBA rides. I have 16 certificates of 14 IBA rides.

The rides have taken me to all 50 states and from Key West to the top of Alaska and never a breakdown.

I like them!thumb up

http://www.victorymotorcycles.com/en-us/community/story/vision-rider-steve-rolland-iron-butt



.
THAT's a heck of a testimonial! Thank-you!

Jim G
 

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Victory

Market Share- I cannot find the site where I got it from, but Victory is now second (distantly) to HD in cruiser sales in North America, so they are not doing too bad.

As for finding dealers on the road- they are not as frequent as HD, but more than BMW or Triumph. I would say it is similar to Yamaha, and I was told that in a pinch, most Polaris dealers and even some metric dealers can do minor repairs.

As for backorders- I've had to wait 4 days for the replacement turn signal on my XC. That was the only time I had to wait for anything. Now, want to talk about the replacement fender for a Vulcan 900 Custom?

And if you are a Honda rider, you may thing that the Victory tranny is a bit clunky (I know that I did), but you get used to it and it works very well. I have had 0 problems. The wear on my front tire on my XC is quick, but that has more to do with how I ride than the bike. :[

As for problems, any problems that I have heard are all different, wear and tear problems (which in my opinion is a good thing, rather than us all complaining about the same thing).

As for size, they all have the same powerplant, but the Vegas 'feels' smaller than the other bikes. If I could afford a second bike, I'd get a Highball myself (getting on a bike with such a low rear end is fun, and they have some zip).
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Market Share- I cannot find the site where I got it from, but Victory is now second (distantly) to HD in cruiser sales in North America, so they are not doing too bad.

As for finding dealers on the road- they are not as frequent as HD, but more than BMW or Triumph. I would say it is similar to Yamaha, and I was told that in a pinch, most Polaris dealers and even some metric dealers can do minor repairs.

As for backorders- I've had to wait 4 days for the replacement turn signal on my XC. That was the only time I had to wait for anything. Now, want to talk about the replacement fender for a Vulcan 900 Custom?

And if you are a Honda rider, you may thing that the Victory tranny is a bit clunky (I know that I did), but you get used to it and it works very well. I have had 0 problems. The wear on my front tire on my XC is quick, but that has more to do with how I ride than the bike. :[

As for problems, any problems that I have heard are all different, wear and tear problems (which in my opinion is a good thing, rather than us all complaining about the same thing).

As for size, they all have the same powerplant, but the Vegas 'feels' smaller than the other bikes. If I could afford a second bike, I'd get a Highball myself (getting on a bike with such a low rear end is fun, and they have some zip).
Thank-you! This is very helpful. I saw recent numbers for Victory versus Harley sales, and Victory was order of magnitude 5% of Harley sales. That's why there are so few Victory dealers. It's a chicken or egg situation. I HAVE noticed though that there are very few mechanical complaints on this forum compared to what I see for Harley (e.g. the wear=prone and costly cam chain tensioning system on the newer HD engines). THAT sounds very good.

Jim G
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Is the Vegas a smaller bike (overall bike, not engine displacement) than the Highball, Hammer, or the other cruiser (versus tourer) models? The Vegas 8 Ball I rode sure SEEMED small and light.

Jim G
 

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I've owned 39 motorcycles in 45 years of riding, but never yet a Victory. I am really attracted to the simplicity and styling of the Vegas 8-Ball, but have a few questions before I sell my current ride (highly customized Honda VTX 1800 Retro) to get one, so I thought I'd ask current actual owners:

- Victory even after 14 years has a very small market share. I keep hearing that there are very few dealerships, so pricing tends to be less competitive for bikes, parts, and service. True or not?

- I've heard that finding a Victory dealer when you need one when touring can be hard. True or not? Do non-Victory dealers readily, and competently, work on Victorys?

- I've heard that many Victory parts are often backordered for long periods of time, and so bikes stay unrideable for weeks or months. True or not?

- Every model of any brand of motorcycles has its weaknesses. For example, on my 2002 VTX 1800 Retro, the original fuel pressure regulator is known to be failure prone, so you replace it BEFORE it sfails and fills the enigne crankcase with fuel. What are the common weaknesses on a Vegas 8 Ball? For example, I've heard that the transmissions are not only clunky but sometimes actually break. True?

- Every model of any brand of motorcycle has its idiosyncrasies. For example, on the VTX 1800, the factory air-fuel ratio between 1800 and 2300 rpm is "off" (maybe for emissions compliance?), and requires correction via a Power Commander to eliminate a resultant "shaking" when cruising in that rpm range. What are the idiosyncrasies on a Vegas 8 Ball?

- I rode a Vegas 8 Ball yesterday, and it struck me as remarkably light and nimble (part of that due to my current ride being so big and heavy I'm sure). The 8 Ball sort of reminded me of a 1970 Norton 750 Roadster I owned back in the day - that too was a very nimble and small bike, and STILL one of my favorites of all the bikes I've owned. Is the Vegas 8 Ball physically (not engine displacement) the same overall size as other Victory cruiser (not touring or bagger) models like the Hammer, Jackpot, etc., or is it physically smaller?

- I like the fact that the 8 Ball has hydraulic lifters, so no valve adjustments needed, and no engine coolant changes needed either. What engine maintenance is required beyond oil and filter changes, air filters, and spark plugs?

- My local dealership in Austin, Texas has NO new OR used 8 Balls, and is playing games on the value of my potential trade. Does anyone know of a FAIR dealership in central Texas, that keeps inventory of used 8 Balls?

Jim G
False
False, no
False
False
Don't know
The same
I'll have to check my manual
No


I got a little confused going back and forth to your post for the questions, so it's possible it might be True, False, yes, False, False, ok, beats me, maybe and yes.

Actually, I have no idea but feel left out when there are questions like this and I don't know any of the answers.

:crzy:
 
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