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Discussion Starter #1
i just added 4" extensions to my Kingpin Tour. When re-installing the banjo bolt on the rear master cylinder the threads stripped out long before my torque wrench hit the 20 lb-ft torque setting. The threads came out attached to the banjo bolt in a single piece -as if they were some cheap pot-metal crap. I've never seen anything like it.

As a long-time Harley rider I'm totally dumbfounded. I have a high-quality click torque wrench and followed the factory service manual for the procedure.

I'm now out $120 for a new master cylinder and am terrified that the new unit will again strip out before reaching the torque specified in the service manual.

Has anyone else suffered a similar fate? What the hell?
 

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It is cheap pot metal made in china... torque wrenches sometimes are not the answer to proper tightening. I have been riding and servicing motorcycles for 50+ years and have never used a torque wrench... go figure. And have never had a problem with not tightening whatever properly.

Screw a nut on a bolt that is run thru something to hold it when you use your torque wrench... then test it with another torque wrench. If you only have the one wrench find a friendly full service mechanic who let you compare your wrench with his.

OR... throw away the torque wrench and learn how to gauge tightening without it.
 

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Hey you 2 add to your profile where you live.
I might find a rear caliper for you
 

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Say why not head over to auto store and see about a heli coil kit
 

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i just added 4" extensions to my Kingpin Tour. When re-installing the banjo bolt on the rear master cylinder the threads stripped out long before my torque wrench hit the 20 lb-ft torque setting. The threads came out attached to the banjo bolt in a single piece -as if they were some cheap pot-metal crap. I've never seen anything like it.
My service manual says to torque it to 96 in/lbs. that would be 8 ft/lbs.
rear master.png
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
My service manual says to torque it to 96 in/lbs. that would be 8 ft/lbs.
View attachment 7853

Thank you!!!! That confirms there is an error in my 2007 service manual. I was thiking there must be be given the way the threads pulled completely out. I triple checked and the 2007 service manual clearly states the torque on the banjo bolt as 20-22 lb- ft.

I figured it was either a mis print or some torque-by-feel mechanic prior to me wrenched it down right good and weakened e threads before I bought the bike.

Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
In the hopes of helping someone else avoid this BS. Clearly the 2007 Victory Kingpin/Vegas/Jackpot service manual is wrong. Torquing the master-cylinder banjo bolt to the service manual specs destroyed my master cylinder (at a cost of $120).

Below are the specs from the 2007 Victory Factory Service Manual. Note, torquing the bolt to this spec will likely destroy the master cylinder. The 2008 manual corrects this spec. to 96 in-lb (8 ft-lb)



 

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Say why not head over to auto store and see about a heli coil kit
Thought about that. $50 for the kit, plus the time to install, risk it won't seal and/or metal filings contaminate the brake system...

I figured my life was worth doing it right.
 

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I figured it was either a mis print or some torque-by-feel mechanic prior to me wrenched it down right good and weakened e threads before I bought the bike.

Thanks again.
Torque by feel is only as good as the "mechanic" doing it... don't slam others for your shortcomings. My feel technique holds true for me and I have never sheared off a brake banjo bolt because I used an improper torque value... a good mechanic would know up front that 20-22 ftlbs was way too much torque... wrench or not!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Torque by feel is only as good as the "mechanic" doing it... don't slam others for your shortcomings. My feel technique holds true for me and I have never sheared off a brake banjo bolt because I used an improper torque value... a good mechanic would know up front that 20-22 ftlbs was way too much torque... wrench or not!!!
Mate, no one is questioning your wrenching skills. Most people, including many professionals, cannot tighten a fastener within +/- 10 ft-lbs by feel. As a lifetime professional design engineer I have witnessed more structural failures due to over-tightened fasteners than any other cause. 8 times out of 10 the root cause of a sheared bolt is over tightening beyond ASTM specification for the metal. That is why torque wrenches were invented.

Regarding your statement that a good mechanic would know that 20 ft-lbs is too much torque: Both my Harley Davidson manuals (2006 Dyna, 2009 Sportster) spec 20-25 ft-lbs for banjo bolt fittings on the master and caliper. The difference is: HD uses billet aluminum rather than cast pot-metal.

I suspect that Victory changed from billet to pot metal some time around 2007 since the 2007 service manual references the torque that is consistent with billet machined aluminum.

Thank you to Bat Man for being helpful here. There is clearly an error in the Vic 2007 service manual.
 

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Mate, no one is questioning your wrenching skills. Most people, including many professionals, cannot tighten a fastener within +/- 10 ft-lbs by feel. As a lifetime professional design engineer I have witnessed more structural failures due to over-tightened fasteners than any other cause. 8 times out of 10 the root cause of a sheared bolt is over tightening beyond ASTM specification for the metal. That is why torque wrenches were invented.

Regarding your statement that a good mechanic would know that 20 ft-lbs is too much torque: Both my Harley Davidson manuals (2006 Dyna, 2009 Sportster) spec 20-25 ft-lbs for banjo bolt fittings on the master and caliper. The difference is: HD uses billet aluminum rather than cast pot-metal.

I suspect that Victory changed from billet to pot metal some time around 2007 since the 2007 service manual references the torque that is consistent with billet machined aluminum.

Thank you to Bat Man for being helpful here. There is clearly an error in the Vic 2007 service manual.
AH, now you're just trying to confuse folks with facts.

I hate that this happened to you but I'm glad you're fixing it right and found the error in the manual. I posted a discussion about torque wrenches on another VIC forum. A lot of people really don't like castings but they are here to stay and do a good job if we do our part. Unfortunately, errors are found at someone's expense and this time it was you. We know it won't be Howard cause he doesn't NEED a torque wrench:D

Just messing with ya Howard. I'm glad it's worked out well for you.
 

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Good thing there are a few on ebay.

Next best thing is we have some good proof readers here
 
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