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Discussion Starter #1
I've been thinking about a very long distance trip in the future...when I retire. What I would do is travel to every State Capitol in the US of A. Initially I was going to do it only on my XC but I'm thinking it might be smarter and safer to take my bike by cage to certain locations explore those areas on my XC and move on to the next location.

The question I have is how should I transport my bike? In the back of a full sized truck with ramps or on a trailer?

I have a few concerns with each option. Getting on and off a truck using ramps is potentially risky for dropping the bike. Using a trailer, there will be times that I would leave it overnight to explore an area on my XC. Have any of you run into problems with overnight parking of a bike trailer and how about the issue of the trailer being stolen?

Maybe there are a few of you who have transported their bike either or both ways who could give me some feedback?

Thanks, JJKJR
 

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If this were me, I'd be thinking of a counter clockwise loop around the edges (mostly) of the country on my bike. I saved many years worth of Shamrock Tour tank bag maps from RoadRunner magazine and would do a bunch of those. Sounds like you have no time constraints, so you can take a year if you want, starting from Florida in spring, going north up the east coast. By summer, you'll be in the Rockies and along the west coast in fall. Winter will find you along the Gulf. Post road reports for us, please.
 

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I'm not doing cross country travel any time soon, but I have friends/neighbors that do. They have an enclosed trailer that hook to their truck (or RV) and LOVE it. Extra storage, secure, out of the elements. Lock the trailer to the truck hitch to avoid overnight theft. The trailer has low load floor with wheel chock. Easy and stable.
 

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Sounds like a hassle to take a vehicle and trailer to me unless your sleeping in it to save $ then it sounds like a great idea.

You can always lock the hitch release and padlock the safety chains to the truck he'll they even have tire boots if your that worried.

I have transported 2 hammers in a truck bed and loading and un loading was supper sketchy I wouldn't do it again unless I had to!
 

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Why would you not ride the bike?
 

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I've been thinking about a very long distance trip in the future...when I retire. What I would do is travel to every State Capitol in the US of A. Initially I was going to do it only on my XC but I'm thinking it might be smarter and safer to take my bike by cage to certain locations explore those areas on my XC and move on to the next location.

The question I have is how should I transport my bike? In the back of a full sized truck with ramps or on a trailer?

I have a few concerns with each option. Getting on and off a truck using ramps is potentially risky for dropping the bike. Using a trailer, there will be times that I would leave it overnight to explore an area on my XC. Have any of you run into problems with overnight parking of a bike trailer and how about the issue of the trailer being stolen?

Maybe there are a few of you who have transported their bike either or both ways who could give me some feedback?

Thanks, JJKJR
They do make auto loading motorcycle ramps for trucks. Check YouTube for some examples. Here is one of many
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hey Folks, Thanks for all the reply's. Joe, I initially looked at the motorcycle power lifts but they're a bit pricey at close to 3 grand. P. Hunt, I want to trailer the bike not to sleep in my truck (although I could) but have to have a second vehicle available as a backup and during severe weather situations.

I found this last night on the Internet. StingerTrailer.com - The Stinger Folding Motorcycle Trailer

It's a foldable trailer called the Stinger. It seems to fit all my needs. It can tow a bike, it's rugged, easy to use and it could be stowed in the back bed of the truck when not being used to discourage theft. Cost is 2 grand.

Anyone have any experience with this trailer?
 

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That's a nice looking trailer, still a bit pricey though, I've seen on amazon cheaper ones that can do your bike trip ....
 

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ride your bike. Think there is a ton of bikes in every city and state you go to.
Maybe New York would be a hard city to get around in.
I have been all over the country and yes some cities look scary but they're not. Ask other bikers where to stay or even ask cops. Park as close as you can to the front door of motel or your ground floor room.
Get a great alarm.
If you're not going to ride get a enclosed trailer and put your bike in there.
Put it in back of truck is a nightmare getting it in and out. You don't want to drop 800 pounds on you.
 

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Ride it. That's why it has wheels and an engine. Trailers are for bikes that are not road-worthy, or for people escaping great-white-northern winter to start their ride in the south. You're starting in Sarasota. I used to live there. You can start and finish your ride there any time of year, on a very road-capable Cross Country.
 

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I use an open trailer to haul our bikes south in the winter when and if we go. My trailer is light and short and custom built for the bikes.

Gas mileage goes from 14-15 at 65 for the 6 cylinder rig I haul it with down to 11 mpg at at the same speed when towing. That's average mpg and that is normal. I've asked several others doing the same thing and that's what you get.
If I leave one bike off I still get 11. It's the rolling resistance of the trailer as well as how it affects the aerodynamics of the towed vehicle.
Empty I think I get about 11- 12.

I just looked up what I paid for gas to drive from the Canadian border to Phoenix a couple of years ago and it was $435 for gas alone.

I could buy a $60,000 diesel and get 15 mpg but the interest on the loan would wipe out the savings in fuel costs.

Bike gets 40 mpg. Trailered bike gets 11. I'd ride it if I could.
Use the money you save to get a nice comfortable motel room each night and enjoy the trip.

If you do get a trailer get an enclosed one. Vehicles going the other way throw up rocks. If you cover the bikes the dirt gets under the cover and dulls the paint. With a covered trailer you never need to be concerned about vandalism, fresh seal coated roads, and other road construction. When up in the morning it's either there or it's not.
 

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I own a enclosed low hauler and its one of the best purchases I could have made. It pulls like a dream and can double as storage when you are out riding. Although I have upgraded to a 38' toy hauler I would strongly recommend going the enclosed route. Gas, gas, gas its all about the experience. Pulling the toy hauler I only get about 12 miles a gallon but its worth every penny. Just wanted to chime in and hope my enclosed trailer comment helps.
 

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There's at least one Victory rider that hit all 48 lower states in 10 days. Bet it would only take a few more to see the state's capital cities. :)
 

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How we travel and get around is as individual a decision as modifying our bikes. IF I was considering a trailer to haul the bike between major riding locations I would be looking for an enclosed trailer, preferably used, that can be properly secured. Drag it around as I wish and use the bike as I wish. When finished in a year or two, simply sell the trailer and if it was looked after, hopefully recover most of the original cost. Even if I'm out a couple of hundred dollars it would be worth the convenience if that was the route I wished to take. If you spend $2,000 then sell it a couple of years later for $1500 that's only about $30 a month. Well worth the price if that's what I wanted and it kept me happy. Hell, I spend way more than that for supper on our weekly night out.

Better yet...Jayco unveils Class C motorhome with garage
 

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I don't transport my bikes very often-If I get on an out of town project that's long enough duration I'll bring one with me. I have a locking wheel chock mounted in my truck bed and 10' folding arched ramp that I can very easily load & unload by my self-it's not a "nightmare" maybe a bit scary the first time but after that you realize how safe & quick it is. Trailers can be a bitch-parking, backing up, storing, extra licence & insurance, & for some reason I always seem to have light/wiring issues with them and they slow me down. I like having everything contained in one vehicle & being able to keep an eye on my bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for all the information, especially those who have trailered their bikes in the past. The toughest decisions to make are those when you don't have the experience behind you to base your decision. I appreciate those who are sharing their experiences to assist others.
 

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Ride it. That's why it has wheels and an engine. Trailers are for bikes that are not road-worthy, or for people escaping great-white-northern winter to start their ride in the south. You're starting in Sarasota. I used to live there. You can start and finish your ride there any time of year, on a very road-capable Cross Country.
Ride your bike, what better way to see and experience the trip than on your bike...
No way Id be trailering.
 
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