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Discussion Starter #1
moved the key switch, bought the plate and harness wires from witchdoctors.com,



spoons asmc
 

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I am not use to the set up of Polaris. My other bike had it up on top with out a key to mess with. Only time you use a key is to lock the ignition. Most of the other bikes I have owned the key was between the bars and tank. I do not reaching down to shut it off. I am in the process of doing it different also..
 

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Discussion Starter #4
switch

2 things i dont like about victory, the key switch and the exhaust , i changed both

spoons asmc
 

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Discussion Starter #7
key

heat on nothing

exhaust on you tube 2011 victory xr exhaust
 

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heat sheild?

Spoons-asm is there a cover over the wiring on the relocated ignition switch. It would seem the rear cylinder exhaust pipe would over heat or slowly cook the wiring and the ignition switch without some-type of heat shield to protect them.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
key

the wires are in front the vent hose, i put bout 1000 miles since i put it on . theres the plate,wires then vent hose

spoons
 

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What do you use instead?
how does it start? How did you bypass the key?
bcflyguywac
I installed the Digital Guard Dawg RFID. My favorite thing for it is I can start the bike and have it running and still lock/unlock my saddlebags. I took a 106 wedge cover a friend of mine wasn't using any more and put it on the left side so there's no key hole.
 

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...Keys are stupid and archaic.
Keys are faithful and never let you down. They're never "having issues" or have a "low battery" or "water got in" or have some bug or error to deal with it. You never have to call the manufacturer to see why your key doesn't work, nor read any manual to troubleshoot some interference between your key and other electronics.

Being reliable, dependable, easy and cheap to maintain, the mechanical key is here to stay. :cool:
 

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I want a key relocation to the area in front of the gas tank. I'm getting used to having the key in a strange place, using the kill switch, and crawling around in the dark looking for that key hole way down there on the low side of the bike. On the plus side, after 21,000 miles on my XCT, the key location remains my biggest complaint! That says something about these bikes.
 

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Keys are faithful and never let you down. They're never "having issues" or have a "low battery" or "water got in" or have some bug or error to deal with it. You never have to call the manufacturer to see why your key doesn't work, nor read any manual to troubleshoot some interference between your key and other electronics.

Being reliable, dependable, easy and cheap to maintain, the mechanical key is here to stay. :cool:
I'm not sure about that. The wife got a Jeep GC base model 4x4 earlier in the year and it has no key to start the vehicle, just a fob and a push button start. I would suspect in a few years most cagers will be that way and possible alot of motorcycles.
 

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I'm not sure about that. The wife got a Jeep GC base model 4x4 earlier in the year and it has no key to start the vehicle, just a fob and a push button start. I would suspect in a few years most cagers will be that way and possible alot of motorcycles.
You're probably right. And that's how the dealership service drives got busy again, and the economy was booming! :pepper:
 

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What happens if (when?) you're riding along, the fob falls out of your pocket, you stop for gas 100 miles later, shut the bike off, and fill-'er-up? Now you can't start up the bike, right? I'm with CR on this.
 

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Keys are faithful and never let you down. They're never "having issues" or have a "low battery" or "water got in" or have some bug or error to deal with it. You never have to call the manufacturer to see why your key doesn't work, nor read any manual to troubleshoot some interference between your key and other electronics.

Being reliable, dependable, easy and cheap to maintain, the mechanical key is here to stay. :cool:
What happens if (when?) you're riding along, the fob falls out of your pocket, you stop for gas 100 miles later, shut the bike off, and fill-'er-up? Now you can't start up the bike, right? I'm with CR on this.


I've owned 2 keyless bikes and would never go back.

They all have onboard systems that let you put in a pin code... you actually never need to take your key with you at all actually. It's just a few seconds faster if you have it.

And lesson learned wspollack... never follow CR blindly into any topic. He fires off quickly without researching the topic he's responding to ;-)
 

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Keys fail. Ignitions fail. Scratch the paint, get lost, tumblers wear and the key falls out. You can come up looking for a ride home just as easy with a keyed ignition as a keyless one.
All that said, once the WOW factor wears off, keyless ain't all it's cracked up to be. There is something that you get from reaching into your pocket or beltloop or whatever and coming up with your bike key.
Tangible, real.
You sweat a chunk of your life away and your key ring is a testimony.

But I am sure as shooting going to move the switch from that silly location between the jugs. It's like the tunage and cruise controls. Must have been the end of the week in Victory Design and they said "c'mon Poindexter, just stuff the ignition switch and the damn controls in there anywhere. It's beer thirty for crying out loud! We ain't waiting on you."
 
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