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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Happy New Year my fellow Vic enthusiasts,

I've decided to remove my rear wheel on my XC today to get the tire replaced. Local shop will swap out the tire and balance for $25. I read the manual, watched the Witch Doctor vid and searched the forum. Before loosening the axel nut, I'll check for side to side play of the wheel to assess wheel bearing wear.

Just a few questions:

1. Should I remove the belt sprocket before taking the wheel assembly to the shop? If so, replace the bolts or reuse & Loctite?
2. Anything I need to lube while apart? The manual says to put a little grease on the axel shaft (I assume to help slide the axel back through during reassembly).
3. Other than eye-balling alignment after reassembly, any tips to ensure the tire is positioned correctly? I'll rotate the tire and check for run out, anything else that needs to be measured?

Thanks in advance!
 

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The axle lube is to help with insertion, to make it easier to remove the next time, and to help prevent corrosion which tends to make it hard to remove the axle. You can use boring old axle grease or pretty much any other grease-like lube. I usually use anti-seize but dang - that stuff gets EVERYWHERE :)

As for adjustments to the wheel after reinstallation - in theory, if you have not turned the axle alignment bolts, then no adjustment is needed. I find that this is an ideal time to adjust the belt tension and to align the belt. Don't "eyeball" this alignment. There is a very thorough process for belt alignment and tensioning in the service manual.

Removal of the belt sprocket and brake rotor depends on what the shop wants and how much you trust them to do things well without scratching "stuff". I've always left them on without problems. If you do remove them, the service manual says to use new bolts when reattaching the sprocket and brake rotor. However, I have always reused the bolts and put red (permanent) loctite on them. Of course, this means that when I remove these bolts, I have to hit each one with a small propane torch for about 45 seconds to melt/burn the old loctite to allow their removal.

Sorry but I know nothing about the wheel bearings.

G'day,

Vinish
 
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if you're using a jack to lift bike loosen axle nut first.
Get it high enough to pull wheel out at angle.
You do not need to pull rotor. It will not get scratched.
The bike shop might need to take pulley off. Victory has larger then normal pulley size.
It can be a challenge to get axle back in if you don't touch the adjusters.
You check wheel bearings after you get wheel off bike. Stick two fingers in middle of bearing and turn it to see how smooth it is. On bike will not tell you ask shop to check all so.
With wheel off stick screwdriver in between brake pads and twist sideways to spread them open.
When you get wheel underbike before lifting put belt on.
Take your time don't panic
 

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Tyre shop that does mine leaves the rear pulley on the wheel and never touches alignment or belt tension.
They say that done properly the tension / alignments good for the life of the belt.
There's two of them do the refit and it always goes smoothly for the six rears I've had changed to date.
For the extra fifty I get charged I rather let the experts do the whole job.
 

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At some point, perhaps the next tire change, while you have the wheel out you may want to pull the pin for the rear shock/rocker/link assembly and inspect it and re grease it. Mine was turning in the frame because of a defect in the bore the pin went into. Mag's was turning in the frame because some moron at the factory forgot to lube the bearings in the rocker with grease. Ricz had issues with his also.

Your about two thirds of the way to inspecting it once the wheel is out. You'll probably want to plan ahead for that though.
 

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To remove the rear wheel, I lift the bike high enough to work under the rear. With either a scissors/platform jack or car wheel jack placed under the rear wheel, I apply just enough lift to unweight the wheel to make it easier to remove the shock link bolts. Then I lower the jack until the swing arm stops and unweight the wheel again to aid axle removal. Then lower the jack and the wheel with it. No muscle work required, except on the 3 nuts. A 2' or longer cheater bar helps, or an impact driver.
 

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All great advice from the peanut gallery :wink One more tip, remove the rear brake pads from caliper before replacing the rim and tire, this will make the job much easier.
 

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all great advice from the peanut gallery :wink one more tip, remove the rear brake pads from caliper before replacing the rim and tire, this will make the job much easier.
Definitely THIS!!
 

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All of this and also: air tools.
 
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if you're using a jack to lift bike loosen axle nut first.
Get it high enough to pull wheel out at angle.
You do not need to pull rotor. It will not get scratched.
The bike shop might need to take pulley off. Victory has larger then normal pulley size.
It can be a challenge to get axle back in if you don't touch the adjusters.
You check wheel bearings after you get wheel off bike. Stick two fingers in middle of bearing and turn it to see how smooth it is. On bike will not tell you ask shop to check all so.
With wheel off stick screwdriver in between brake pads and twist sideways to spread them open.
When you get wheel underbike before lifting put belt on.
Take your time don't panic
If the shop has to take off the pulley, they don't have the right machine and I wouldn't let them touch my wheel. The bolts attaching the pulley are a one use item and need to be replaced if you remove them. I know plenty of you think I'm wrong and that's fine. it's your life. Victory mandates replacement of bolts if removed or loosened. Those bolts are in tension and shear stresses and there's plenty of cases where people on this very forum have had failures of those very bolts. My neighbor just had a failure of his pulley bolts on an HD superglide AFTER an independant shop did his tires, he asked if they removed his pulley and they did and did not replace the bolts and now he's fighting with the shop to recoup some money. I recently had surgery on my right wrist and elbow so I couldn't change his tires on my machine and he needed the tires, I did talk him through the repair while I watched. He got lucky and didn't do much damage. Replaced the pulley and bolts, cleaned up the flange and he was good to go. I am in the habit of checking the torque of any belt drive pulley I touch. If it's loose...I replace.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks everyone for the advice.. Just finished installing the tire a few hours ago. Lessons learned:

I'm surprised how stable the bike was on the motorcycle jack. I'm usually cautious but I never felt the need to strap the bike down.

Didn't have to touch the exhaust except to adjust the belt. I loosened the left pipe and rotated it down to gain access to the axel nut. Easy stuff.

Removing the brake pads made installation MUCH easier (Thanks PaiN!) I tried getting everything lined up with the pads in but couldn't get the spacers in place. Removing the pads made for easy work.

Ask the shop if they removed the pulley and if so, how they reinstalled it. In my case, they removed it but used Red Loctite when putting it back together. They also torqued it to what the book says.

I had to tighten the belt afterwards, not surprising considering the mileage. The last time the rear tire was off was at 20,500 miles. Now I have 36,400 (yes, good mileage out of the tire but should have replaced it at 35,000).

Alignment wasn't too hard. I followed the service manual and it worked out fine.

While, up on the jack, I noticed a small oil seep coming from the shifter seal in the primary cover. It's small enough that I will just periodically check it.

Thanks everyone for the advice!
 
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