Victory Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,354 Posts
All the more reason to be a trained rider who is aware of surroundings and all possible hazards. To dress for the crash, not the ride and dress in attention grabbing colors. I am constantly amazed and amused by riders who wear a matte black helmet, black jacket and ride a black bike and complain that divers don't see them. Duh!
BTW, I am presently upgrading my Clearwater Glendas (800 lumens) to the new Darlas (2,000 lumens) for greater conspicuity during the daytime and visibility at night. The Darlas are the same size as the Glendas - 2" diameter & length - but put out the same light intensity as their much larger Kristas. I'm working hard to preserve what life I have left. You do the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,331 Posts
I just took a refresher course. Probably wouldn't help against most drivers but it does remind you to do everything you can to make yourself visible and a void the problem zones

So sorry o hear about the 3 riders
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,182 Posts
cell.jpg This is what scares the hell out of me, I see it every day. They pull out of Starbucks with coffee in one hand talking on the cell phone in the other. Every thing on their left side they do not see. And they do not care..:crzy:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
There are two kinds of riders;

1. Those that have been down.

2. Those that will go down.

Prepare yourself accordingly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
It happened in Wolcott, CT. A girl texting while driving rear-ended a guy on a bike at a light . He's in critical condition, pray for him. A cop watched it happen, she didn't even notice the cop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
It can happen anywhere, anytime. A guy here locally went down a few weeks ago when a drunk Mexican on a bicycle carrying a 12 pack of Coronas pulled out in front of him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
I was recently invited to take a state troopers training course, we had a lot of fun driving the trooper cars on the obstacle course and skid pad but in the classroom it got serious and one of the big things was motorcycle safety and lack of respect for motorcycles most drivers show, I highly recommend taking a motorcycle specific defensive driving class, what you learn may save your life, I'll be the first to admit I was or of the riders that rode all in black but today I will be picking up some high visibility gear, I never saw anybody look cool in a casket


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,331 Posts
Lets be realistic. First if you don't own a bike the average person does not notice them. You own one you see them everywhere, you look for them. Drivers don't. Easy fixes to be more noticeable, lights even during the day, bright colored clothes, flashing LED that can attach to the back of your helmet, LED turn signals, bright is better.

Always and I mean always keep it in first gear at stops. Enter intersection with an escape route, check those mirrors, listen for squealing brakes or loud motor speed from the car coming behind you. Position your bike out of blind spots. Ride within your ability and assume the drivers around you have no skills
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,684 Posts
Lets be realistic. First if you don't own a bike the average person does not notice them. You own one you see them everywhere, you look for them. Drivers don't. Easy fixes to be more noticeable, lights even during the day, bright colored clothes, flashing LED that can attach to the back of your helmet, LED turn signals, bright is better.

Always and I mean always keep it in first gear at stops. Enter intersection with an escape route, check those mirrors, listen for squealing brakes or loud motor speed from the car coming behind you. Position your bike out of blind spots. Ride within your ability and assume the drivers around you have no skills
I agree 100%thumb up
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
They teach you that you are invisible to cars... I say BS... they see us and are AIMING for us. Drive defensively.

Been down hard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
848 Posts
"I didn't see him" the usual excuse. Thi sis also the most often quoted excuse when cars hit:

Ambulances responding to or parked at a Accident scene...

Fire Trucks responding to or parked at a response scene....

Police vehicles parked in a traffic stop or enroute to....


The point is Cagers are not looking period! I rode witht he Gold Wing crowd, talk about lights and flashing blinking attention getters, yep they didn't see him.

Ran a Brush Truck... got tee boned when the car ran a red light and flipped my rig... Did see me or the light.

How in the hell do you think they will see us on our bikes!???
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
918 Posts
Hum I have a black bike black helmet and when its cool enough I wear either my black jacket or vest.. I never have a problem with people seeing me or my HID light..That analogy is bogus come on man. Do you really think people are looking for color?

The problem is we are small in comparison to a car or truck. They know we dont wanna go down and if we get tangled up the car or truck will win everytime. So they expect us to gang way or give way to them no matter what..people just dont care.

EXPECT IT!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
There are two kinds of riders;

1. Those that have been down.

2. Those that will go down.

Prepare yourself accordingly.
That is pure BS every time I hear it. If that were the case who would ride a motorcycle? IF anyone that thought that every time I threw a leg over I would quit riding after 1 years as their due date gets closer and ride recklessly if they had theirs at 22 years old safe for the rest of their lives I suppose.. The Odds and statistics do not agree. That is ERC training BS to scare riders.

FYI There are 6,000,000 registered bikes in the US. Every year 100K will have an injurious get off, 40% will be the bikers fault 100%, dunk ,inexperienced,hot dogging, testing limits at places like Mullholland and Deals Gap, Others will be multi vehicle the biker could have avoided with some diligence.
,5000 riders will die. 68% with helmets and gear. The ONLY wrecks a biker has abso;utley no control over are animal encounters and mechanical failures which make up for 2% of less than 2% of all get offs.......and to an extent rear enders.

We have over 300K partying riders for three weeks every May here. and none were lost during Crusier Week and 6 were lost during Sport bike week , Half of which were the riders fault. and most are not wearing any gear here.

A rider get off sucks. but at the end of the day it's bad luck half the time and the odds are less than 1% it will happen to anyone. If one lives in an urban area the odds go up. Geography and riding miles count as well.

So that tells me 6,000,900 riders make it home safely each and every year and MOST riders go through there entire lives without an injury from a get off. I could have ridden naked for the past 35 years and nary a scratch.

Everyone will not have an injurious get off by a huge margin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,499 Posts
The problem is we are small in comparison to a car or truck. They know we dont wanna go down and if we get tangled up the car or truck will win everytime. So they expect us to gang way or give way to them no matter what..people just dont care.
EXPECT IT!
I think this applies to a majority of the WTF's I see every day and I will take it a step further and say even when in my PU it is Okie's last sentence. "People just don't care" or lack of respect on the road for other drivers. I really don't feel much safer in my cage than on the bike as I pretty much drive like I ride, as said already defensively. With attention on almost anything but driving and the feeling "Im bigger so you gotta move" it doesnt matter what were in, were an obstical to an idiot behind a wheel.

I ride with my road jacket (leather or mesh for seasonal), glove, reflective vest and a shorty helmet. So you can't say I ride for the slide but having been hit once (again, not as bad as some on here), I wear enough equipment I feel comfortable. I ride with intent and attention using experience for additional lighting, horn and positioning on the road, where to cruise, when to pass, etc. and most importantly I know the limits of my machines (bikes or cages) and my skills.

I think there are many riders just like drivers, out there that are exceeding their skill set or what their machine is capable of. They are what increase the dangers on the road, not to say I havent made a mistake, missed something, etc... Of course but because there is a cushion in HOW I ride/drive, WE have been able to absorb it. I don't believe the 2 type of rider theory (those that have or will)or I wouldnt have got back on the bike.

What I do believe is there are two types of motorist. Those that give a **** and those that don't. Keep'em safe out there and enjoy the ride while we can!!!!cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
The rider I posted about earlier passed away yesterday. Pray for him and his family. They haven't charged the girl who hit him yet, but I'm sure it's coming. I'm pretty sure she did not mean to do it, but texting while driving is as bad as driving drunk and should be treated the same way. After some jail time she should lose her driving privileges and not be allowed to own a cell phone!:(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
That is pure BS every time I hear it. If that were the case who would ride a motorcycle? IF anyone that thought that every time I threw a leg over I would quit riding after 1 years as their due date gets closer and ride recklessly if they had theirs at 22 years old safe for the rest of their lives I suppose.. The Odds and statistics do not agree. That is ERC training BS to scare riders.

FYI There are 6,000,000 registered bikes in the US. Every year 100K will have an injurious get off, 40% will be the bikers fault 100%, dunk ,inexperienced,hot dogging, testing limits at places like Mullholland and Deals Gap, Others will be multi vehicle the biker could have avoided with some diligence.
,5000 riders will die. 68% with helmets and gear. The ONLY wrecks a biker has abso;utley no control over are animal encounters and mechanical failures which make up for 2% of less than 2% of all get offs.......and to an extent rear enders.

We have over 300K partying riders for three weeks every May here. and none were lost during Crusier Week and 6 were lost during Sport bike week , Half of which were the riders fault. and most are not wearing any gear here.

A rider get off sucks. but at the end of the day it's bad luck half the time and the odds are less than 1% it will happen to anyone. If one lives in an urban area the odds go up. Geography and riding miles count as well.

So that tells me 6,000,900 riders make it home safely each and every year and MOST riders go through there entire lives without an injury from a get off. I could have ridden naked for the past 35 years and nary a scratch.

Everyone will not have an injurious get off by a huge margin.
I would love to know where you got these numbers. The vast majority of registered bikes RARELY leave the garage. Making those stats useless. It's like saying the odds of getting in a rock climbing accident is small because you're including people that don't rock climb in your stats. Also, I own three bikes and have owned as many as five at one time, how does that effect your "registered bike" stats?

FACT: Of the 8 people I know best who ride daily or nearly daily ALL have been ejected or done the slide. We all have 30+ years riding experience. Most of our group have encountered lefty turners and rear enders. All of us have very long periods without incident.

Please define "nary a scratch". I take that as you have been injured but for some reason it doesn't count. I call that denial.

I believe if you ride long enough and far enough it's gonna happen. We the lucky ones recover to ride again. We can significantly reduce the odds with diligence but no-one can control the eighty five year old woman who hits the gas instead of the brake or the sixteen year old who can't wait to text their bff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
After I posted that I got on my bike and took off to get in a few hundred miles before it rains. As I topped the Roosevelt bridge and caught the sunrise over the ocean I thought of my dear old momma (as any good southern boy does) and remembered something she said; "If you ever find yourself argueing with an idiot there are two idiots argueing"

Disregard everything I said. You are right. I am wrong. Have a great day, coffee is empty time to ride on.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,632 Posts
Disregard everything I said. You are right. I am wrong. Have a great day, coffee is empty time to ride on.
I don't think either of you is wrong. There are surely plenty of people who get by without wrecking. If it were that dangerous, virtually no one would do it. But for those of us who spend a lot of time in the seat, the odds that we will encounter something we can't out maneuver or simply screw up increase. Usually guys with a lot of experience have a tale or two to share...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
Living on Cape Cod...riding around here in the summer can be hairy to say the least. Tourists looking everywhere but toward the road and or ignoring what's around them. Blue hairs and college kids texting can be an adventure. So, i am constantly sweeping side to side for idiots who don't see me. I ride as if I am invisible...so far its worked.

I am in the process of adding more daytime driving lights and more rear brake lights to help w/visibility. In the end all you really can do is make yourself visible, ride with in your means and be smart. After that..it's out of your control.

BTW, i have a black bike, with a black helmet and black jacket. The jacket i did add silver reflective tape strips to it so it stands out nicely at night.. I have seen bikes with reflective tape added to them in spots that are barely noticeable. With all the chrome on one that i saw it blended in nicely actually. I know its not sexy on the bike, but, it makes a huge difference at night.

Another option i have seen is very small side led marker lights. Put inside/next to the frame on the front and in front of the saddlebags in the rear. It not only looked cool but made the bike visible from all sides with lights.

Be safe everyone and ride on!
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top