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Discussion Starter #1
I was in a auto accident 3 weeks ago. I lost my right eye and broke my left arm. I can't ride because of my arm. My question is. When my arm is better will I have a problem riding with just 1 eye? Any feedback would be appreciated.
 

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I have no personal experience but I'm sure you will adjust. Heal well and be safe!
 

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You will adjust to a point. You still lost 90+ degrees of vision. So that may take a lot of adjusting. I guess you and your conscience will have to decide if you are truly capable. I would hate to have to make the decision, so not envying you a bit.

Sorry to hear about this. Heal quickly and well.

cheers
 

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Not only that but your depth perception is gone now. You will have to retrain yourself to anticipate distance because you no longer have stereoscopic vision. It can most definitely be done, however.

[EDIT] Great minds, WABlue :)
 

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I see this dude occasionally in my area. He only has one eye. Last year I saw him in a small town at a convenience store. He had his lady with him and had just bought a Victory V92.

I am very sure you will adjust and probably be a better rider and even enjoy it more. Such trauma in our lives shakes us and makes us better human beings. thumb up

Oh! I'd caution you to use the very best eye protection you can find.
 

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you're going to have to learn to ride all over again.
You will have to learn to keep your head sideways so you can get the best view of the road in front of you.
I would rush into riding again. Wait till your adjusted to having just one eye
 

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you're going to have to learn to ride all over again.
You will have to learn to keep your head sideways so you can get the best view of the road in front of you.
I would rush into riding again. Wait till your adjusted to having just one eye
You're going to scare the hell out of any one that follows you with your head sideways
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm not going to attempt to ride until I'm100%. Good eye protection is very high on the list! When I'm back 100% and used to 1 eye I will get back on my bike! My kingpin is the best way to wind down after a long day so relaxing! Thanks everyone for the encouragement!
 

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I have a good friend who lost the sight in one eye early in his childhood. Was an excellent rider until he finally decided he was too old to ride in his mid 70's.

I never knew he was blind in one eye till we went riding together and I came up along side him on his blind side. When we stopped at a light he quickly explained that he had only one working eye.

My first thought was he was kidding. But he wasn't. He was an excellent rider. You shouldn't have any issues once you adjust to it.
I've got some issues myself and I really miss the parts that don't work right anymore but my love for riding has been a driving force in getting on with life. Stuff happens.
 

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You will adjust to a point. You still lost 90+ degrees of vision...
Distance and depth perception will take some getting used to...
Both of these statements have a certain amount of validity. The loss of one eye will directly and substantially reduce your peripheral vision to the side of the eye you have lost. This will necessitate turning your head to that side to see what is there. The setting for your mirror on that side will become much more critical. Your depth perception is also directly affected. Judging distance from other vehicles, obstacles and intersections ('stop' lines etc.), as well as the rate at which your are overtaking another vehicle, will be more difficult but while you will be unable to fully regain accuracy, it will improve over time as your brain re-trains itself.

This, however, does not mean the end to your riding. I have dealt with retinal tears for several years. Sometimes the tears also cause bleeding into the inner eye. When this happens, the vision in that eye is virtually non existent for a period of time as it creates what appears as a dark gray 'cloud' that completely blurs the vision in that eye. Until the blood dissipates and the 'cloud' disappears, I wear a patch over that eye in order to see only out of the clear eye. I still ride but during that period I must make adjustments for the two issues listed above. You must also learn to make an adjustment for establishing your line through a curve or a turn.

All the best with your recovery and future riding.
 

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Well, I rode for about a year with one eye ( I was considered legally blind in one eye) I had a surgery 20 some years earlier and the repair had caused a spider growth so I " didn't looks so good"!!! LOL. I had more surgery and now I am back to 2 eyeballs but glasses. I can truthfully say it took a bit to get used to A) ride with one eye B) drive with one eye. But now I have lost depth perception and I have learned to overcome that also ( backing up my Holiday trailer is a hoot - NOT). The brain can overcome quite a bit of obstacles! I would say you need to practice turning your head a lot ( that is what it takes to learn to see as much as possible ) when you are down to one eye! cheers
 

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The brain can overcome quite a bit of obstacles!
I've seen articles where someone had to have half their brains removed. They recovered and did very well with minimal residual effects. Of course I was impressed and decided to suggest that some people I know that act like they have half a brain, get this surgery. :D
 

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I'm sorry to hear of your accident and injuries, I have a close friend that lost his eye years ago, he overcame the loss and continues to ride. I know he spent a lot of time recovering before he was able to ride again.

I've got eye issues that have me down to 1-1/2 most times and 1 at others. My greatest issues are anytime there is changing light, sunrise or dusk, and bright sunny days with lots of shadows. I loose a lot of depth of field and details can be muted or muddy as my brain struggles to make sense of what time seeing. Bright lights at night can do the same thing.

Be safe and best of luck in your recovery.
 

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I've only been riding for a short time, but have been living without vision in my right eye for about 20 years. Hunting accident.

At first, it will take some getting used to. I was young (15) when it happened and I think that helped me adapt and bounce back.

I would respectfully disagree that you'll have no depth perception but do agree you should wait until you're 100% to jump on a bike again.

Your depth perception for "short" sight will be harder. I still have a hard time pouring milk into a glass every once in a while or reaching for a door handle or hitting the edge of a stair. Your "long" sight won't be that hard. Your eyes are so close together that the stereoscopic vision for something 20 yards away doesn't really help. It has more to do with other elements of your environment that are based on sight but aren't impacted by the loss of stereoscopic vision. How far away a stop sign is for instance. When you're 100 yards away, you know you're about 100 yards away because of the size of the sign and your prior knowledge and experience. It isn't because you have two eyes. I think I remember someone saying that beyond 20 feet stereoscopic vision doesn't really help. Not sure if that's true or not. Just a recollection.

There were some other really good comments about field of vision. This is a big deal. You'll find yourself "leading" with your good eye, ie turning your head slightly so that you can see more out of your peripheral vision with your good eye. I turn my head slightly to the right so I can see more out of my left eye. It will seem natural for a while, but it is dangerous because you are exposing your eye slightly more so to injury. I end up turning my head a lot on my bike. I usually turn and look twice before changing lanes.

There were other good comments about protection. This is a must. I always wear sunglasses and a visor. I wouldn't screw around with this at all.

Don't let this define you. You'll get used to it. Most people don't notice this about me unless I tell them. One pupil is slightly larger than the other, but other than that, no one can tell. I still play basketball, fly planes, shoot guns, etc. Sometimes things require a slight adjustment, but that's about it.

Good luck. Sorry that happened. If you have questions or anything and want to chat with someone that's been living with one eye for a while, let me know.
 

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My dad lost 90% of the vision in his eye about 15 years ago. After he got to the point where he could pour water into a glass again and felt he understood his depth perception again he started riding. He doesn't have to ride with his head turned funny or anything just has to make sure he turns his head more to check blind spots and when turning.

The one key thing is solid glasses that protect the good eye. Getting dust into that is really bad. My dad loves Panoptics because they get a good seal around his eyes. He has 100k miles since the accident so riding is for sure still doable. Crazy bastard even rides his manual foot clutch, side shift '53 Indian Chief around town.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I do plan on riding again and living a normal life. There was never a question about that. I will heal up and get on with my life. Please don't take that the wrong way it's just that I never considered giving up. Thanks for all the feedback and support you all have given me. I hope I'll be riding in a few months.
 

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About three years ago I lost 90% of my vision in my strong eye after getting hit by a limb riding my tractor, did not ride my bike for a year. It was hard to ride at first but I have adjusted to almost not noticing until someone pulls up along my blind side since my side vision is gone. Depth perception was fun at first but you will get used to it, now I hardly notice.

The thing I miss the most is shooting, trained myself to shoot pretty serviceable with my other eye but it is not the same fun as it used to be.

Good luck, it will never be the same but it will be ok in the end.
 

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I was in a auto accident 3 weeks ago. I lost my right eye and broke my left arm. I can't ride because of my arm. My question is. When my arm is better will I have a problem riding with just 1 eye? Any feedback would be appreciated.
Sorry mate to hear about your accident, i knew a man who lost his eye and had no problems driving, only problem is DEPTHS perceptions ... Do whatever feels right for you and take it slow ???
 
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