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I realize from my shop manual and the assorted parts-fiche sites that the air hose that connects to the rear shock is not a separately available item (see example attached pic). I was wondering, however, how it is actually attached to the shock body, e.g., screwed in via threads, crimped in place, magically connected inside the shock, etc.

Anyone taken a shock out, or otherwise seen one up close and personal, know how this hose connects to the shock?
 

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The dealership showed me the new shock before they put it in my XR this summer and I think the hose in crimped on.
 

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Discussion Starter #4

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Well, that certainly clears up this mystery.

Thanks guys.
That's so you can pick which answer suits you better thumb up
I have one hanging in my garage at home. If nobody gives a firm answer, I'll check when I get home in 5 days. I'm reasonably sure it is crimped on.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That's so you can pick which answer suits you better thumb up
I have one hanging in my garage at home. If nobody gives a firm answer, I'll check when I get home in 5 days. I'm reasonably sure it is crimped on.
Botein: I'd be delighted to wait 5 -- or even 6 or 7 -- days to get the answer. If you would, and if at all possible, please post a detailed close-up pic of this connection. The pic on eBay was pretty good, but not definitive.

Interestingly, earlier today I had a brief email exchange, that went as follows:

Me to them:

I have a 2012 Victory "Cross Country Tour" motorcycle, which uses a single air-adjustable KYB rear shock. It is Polaris (the parent company of Victory motorcycles) part number 1542905, "Shock RSU-KYB AIR 90N/MM Victory Cross Country 2012 2013."

Included in that part number is a hose. One end of that hose is connected to the shock, and the other end terminates in a Schrader valve (the same type and size as found on tire valves, for instance, for the user to adjust the pressure).

I have a question that I hope someone can answer: how is the end of the hose that attaches to the shock body actually attached to the shock?

I am considering replacing that hose -- to make it longer -- and would like to know whether the hose screws into the shock body (perhaps with some sort of O-ring), or whether the hose is crimped in place on the shock body, or whether some other system is used for attachment.

Thank you for any assistance in this matter.

Regards,


KYB promptly back to me:

Bill,

KYB America covers only the aftermarket automotive industry, unfortunally we don't carry any information about OEM motorcycle parts. Please contact your motorcycle manufacturer for more information.

Thank you

Tech Support


And the Japanese KYB site ( http://www.kyb.co.jp/english/category/products/motorcycle ) doesn't appear to have a "Contact Us" email link, and you know Victory is not going to be any help, so, Botein, the world is now resting on your shoulders.
 

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I realize from my shop manual and the assorted parts-fiche sites that the air hose that connects to the rear shock is not a separately available item (see example attached pic). I was wondering, however, how it is actually attached to the shock body, e.g., screwed in via threads, crimped in place, magically connected inside the shock, etc.

Anyone taken a shock out, or otherwise seen one up close and personal, know how this hose connects to the shock?
now that we know you want to length your hose. Go to a good bycicle store and get a schrader valve adaptor. Then you can add a line
 

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Discussion Starter #8
now that we know you want to length your hose. Go to a good bycicle store and get a schrader valve adaptor. Then you can add a line
VJ: I wish it were that simple. I've spent hours -- actually, must total days by now -- on the 'Net looking at bicycle parts, Schrader companies, hydraulic companies, etc., etc., for the sort of thing I want... with no success. And I've emailed a few of these companies, describing exactly what I'm looking for, with no luck. What I was looking for would be some sort of cube-like connector, which would make that sharp right turn while not sticking out much past the stock valve; people make this sort of thing on a larger scale, for hydraulics and such like. I even researched the thread diameter and pitch of Schrader valves, thinking to have one made up by some machinist.

What I want to do is make a sharp right turn at the user end of the hose, add a hose (10" - 12" or so), and come out the front of the side cover. What has been stopping me is that there is less than half an inch of clearance, underneath, between the end of the stock Schrader valve and the side cover. I've tried adding right-angle valves and more acute-angle valves, but the cover won't fit back on if you do that.

If you have some specific part in mind at a bicycle store, I'm all ears. Otherwise, sorry, I don't really follow the drift of your suggestion.
 

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relocate hose

How about just moving the hose out of the stock hole that it is bolted into. Point it forward , maybe use a bracket from the hardware store or make one out of a small piece of steel or alunimum. Then screw your longer hose onto that and go ahead run it up to your handlebars,ha,ha.wac
 

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Take a look at car air shock hose kits. There are many varieties, you may be able to use one of those kits to extend the factory air shock hose. I recall seeing one that looked promising and you can cut the high pressure hose to a length that suits your needs. It also appears to be completely reversible since the adapter screws onto the air shocks Schrader valve. I was looking into this before other concerns became priority.




Tech23
 

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Discussion Starter #12
How about just moving the hose out of the stock hole that it is bolted into. Point it forward , maybe use a bracket from the hardware store or make one out of a small piece of steel or alunimum. Then screw your longer hose onto that and go ahead run it up to your handlebars,ha,ha.wac
That may be a possibility. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Take a look at car air shock hose kits. There are many varieties, you may be able to use one of those kits to extend the factory air shock hose. I recall seeing one that looked promising and you can cut the high pressure hose to a length that suits your needs. It also appears to be completely reversible since the adapter screws onto the air shocks Schrader valve. I was looking into this before other concerns became priority.Tech23
Another possibility. First I want to make sure I know how the shock-body connection works.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Add in a mini compressor and a switch at the handlebars and it would be air shock heaven. :)
That would be nice. HMD sells something like this, but it's expensive and I can't see a good place to put a gauge (and don't want to run tubing that would move with the handlebars/fairing). You'd think -- or at least I would -- that a bike in this price range would already have something like that built in.
 

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Add in a mini compressor and a switch at the handlebars and it would be air shock heaven. :)
Put together a kit and I would be in line for one. Better yet, get a shock that would allow +/- an inch or two for air adjustable height from the bars and I would be all over it. Imagine going from the perfect ride height to pipe dragging slammed at the flip of a switch. Yeah baby!!!


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Put together a kit and I would be in line for one. Better yet, get a shock that would allow +/- an inch or two for air adjustable height from the bars and I would be all over it. Imagine going from the perfect ride height to pipe dragging slammed at the flip of a switch. Yeah baby!!!
Beo: If you want to go whole-hog, so to speak, maybe you should check out HMD's "Air On Command" (about half-way down the page at http://www.hmd520.com/category/XC---Suspension-38 ), and the gauge (farther down the page).

As I say, however, I don't want to spend the money, and I have no experience in that sort of work. And I don't know where I'd mount the gauge. (And, for that matter, I'm not thrilled with giving up saddlebag space for two-up trips.) All that aside, though, you may have different priorities.

Don't get me started on how Victory dropped the ball on this...
 

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Beo: If you want to go whole-hog, so to speak, maybe you should check out HMD's "Air On Command" (about half-way down the page at http://www.hmd520.com/category/XC---Suspension-38 ), and the gauge (farther down the page).

As I say, however, I don't want to spend the money, and I have no experience in that sort of work. And I don't know where I'd mount the gauge. (And, for that matter, I'm not thrilled with giving up saddlebag space for two-up trips.) All that aside, though, you may have different priorities.

Don't get me started on how Victory dropped the ball on this...
Got one in the garage, never hooked it up. When I bought it he told me he had custom mounted one under rear fender and was working on a bracket, but no time. Told him I'd buy one if he could make the bracket as I did not want it if I had to put it in the saddlebag. He said he would make me one, never heard from him again.
 

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Don't get me started on how Victory dropped the ball on this...
I just have to know… how often do you actually check/change the pressure in your shock? Is it really often enough to make removing the side cover that big of an inconvenience?

I think I've only checked my pressure 2 or 3 times in the year I've owned the bike so I'm more than OK with removing the side cover to access the valve. It only takes but seconds to do. Yet you're not the first I've heard yearning for a more easily accessible valve stem.

I'm by no means knocking your idea of wanting to do this, I've come up with far stranger convenience driven mods for my Jeep. This just doesn't seem to me like one that is worth all the effort you've put into it. That being said, I think remounting the factory stem in a different orientation and then adding an extension hose to the existing Schrader valve will likely be your best option.
 

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I check mine quite often and change the pressure from riding solo with empty bags to 2-up and then 2-up with bags loaded down. Sometimes I will compromise and leave the shock at 40 lbs but when riding solo I like setting it where it is supposed to be for my weight which is almost 0.
 

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I check mine quite often and change the pressure from riding solo with empty bags to 2-up and then 2-up with bags loaded down. Sometimes I will compromise and leave the shock at 40 lbs but when riding solo I like setting it where it is supposed to be for my weight which is almost 0.
Same here. Also go up to the mountains a lot and with the bike lowered need to adjust it at times to keep from scrapping in the turns.
 
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