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Discussion Starter #1
I ve been reading about the importance of letting your bike warm up good before you start riding and letting it get to operating temp.I only have 7 min (if I go highway) to 12 min ride to work. I let it warm up for about 2 mins in the am but does it reach full operating temp in the short ride I have? I dont want to build any carbon or anything else in the motor. At start up I use the fast idle lever control for a min then just move it to reg idle. It feels like im taking a test ride everyday and just dont want to screw anything up. Thanks for your input.hope this makes sense.
 

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I give mine the time it takes to back out of the garage and toss the dogs their departure biscuits. You just need a minute to get the oil circulated.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Or, you could go the long way :)


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I do when Im not pressed for time. But the long way is the 12 min ride. I start at 5:30 and I dont crawl outta bed till 4:50. Let the mutt out and feed her make me lunch and out the door.Im probably just over thinking this.Just want my bike to last trouble free or at least till I can get another Vision.
 

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When the fins are warm to the touch I'm gone. In summer that's about a minute maybe. I don't hammer the machine right out of the gate but it only takes a block or two under load to get fully up to temp.

You get dispensation on travel time anyway. You have to live in Burrillville and work in Point Jude to have enough time to get a decent ride going.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
[

You get dispensation on travel time anyway. You have to live in Burrillville and work in Point Jude to have enough time to get a decent ride going.[/QUOTE]

your right about that. every ride around here (RI) is a short ride.
 

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There are two schools of thought on this.

One is that getting the bike moving right away and just being nice to it until it reaches operating temp is best. Reasoning: Engines are designed with tolerances that work when at operating temp. When cold the tolerances don't stack up the same so getting it warm quickly is beneficial to longevity. You still want to be easy on it though so everything has a chance to come up to temp at the same rate.

Other is more specific to air cooled motors and that one is to start it and let it run until it's completely up to temp. Reasoning: Air cooled motors don't have the thermal stability of water cooled and as such different parts heat up at vastly different rates. Specifically the pistons get hot far faster than the cylinders. This can result in the pistons expanding faster than the cylinders do resulting in damage or seizure. Allowing the motor to warm slowly (idling) prevents the pistons from heating too quickly.

Now my personal belief is that option 2 WAS relevant back in the day of air cooled cars with big chunks of iron for engine blocks. I can see how the cylinders and block of an engine like that would take FOREVER to heat up so piston expansion could be a real problem. With the minimalistic engines of today and the use of aluminum for just about everything I personally don't believe this to be a concern anymore so I subscribe to option 1. FWIW I also use option 1 on my '78 911SC and at nearly 80,000 miles that car still runs like a champ.

In either case though, the important take away is to make sure everything has a chance to come up to temp BEFORE you start beating on it. Starting up and tearing off right away is a great way to destroy a motor. Keep the throttle position and the revs down for a few miles (more if it's cold out) until the engine is good and warm then go have fun.

As for the short length of your ride, it's common (in cars anyway) for people like yourself to end up with premature exhaust rot. Short trips don't get all the condensation out of the system which leaves water in the low spots pretty much all the time. This eventually rots out the metal. If your daily commute is that short I suggest a weekend ride that gets you out farther so you can clear everything out. Good for the mind, and good for the bike.
 

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A 2-minute warm-up should be plenty. I'll usually start the bike, roll it out of the garage, close the door, get situated, etc. If the fins are warm, then off I go. Typically between 1-2 minutes.
 

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You start the bike and put your hand on the rear cylinder you can feel the heat build up. When the head gets warm to the touch you can go.
Take the long way to work as much as possible to get the motor good and warm. The short rout doesn't get the motor hot enough and condensation can form in the motor.
Back in the early years Vic's had a bigger oil cooler and Vic found out that the motors would not get warm enough and they had problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the input guys. It is exactly what I was lookin for.I do let it warm for 2min minimum then just let the motor take me down my street to the main rd. Mabey I could get up a little earlier because there is one way i can go that is about 15 min + but it goes through a shitty part of town (roads included in that statement).
 

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i start mine, put my helmet on and go , i have a mile of gravel so i generally do see over 40 anyway , then im off!


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Discussion Starter #14
Just ride it spank , your bike will be fine ....thumb up
Yeah your right. I tend to get a tad anal (ha let the fun begin) with my prize possessions I buy for myself.Im sure everyone else does also.I wash my bike 3 or more times a week.depends how many bugs are splattered on it from riding.
 

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Start it. Put on whatever gear you have. Clunk into 1st. Take it easy for a few miles. When you don't need the fast idle lever to keep it running at 1k rpm; let her rip.

Mine is really cold blooded. If I stop for more than a few minutes I'll have to use the fast idle lever for a short time. I figure if it cools off that fast it must warm up just as fast.
 
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