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I've had my 2015 Cross Country, 6,000 miles, less-than 2 months and I noticed a slow oil leak last week. I wiped everything down to 1) ensure I was looking at an active leak, and 2) determine where it's leaking from. I did a 300 mile trip two days ago and it is most definitely an active leak. It's not leaking fast enough to prevent any riding, but it's certainly a concern. I just can't determine where it's leaking from - I'm hoping your collective experience can help out before I resort to taking it to a (former) dealership.

It's leaking from the front underside of the engine, on the right-hand side. Behind the oil cooler radiator, below the heads, to the front of the transmission case cover (my terminology may be incorrect: small cover on the right-hand side that has "Overdrive 6" printed on it). Photos attached.

Based on reading through other forum posts (both here and other sites), it sounds like sloppy oil changes and bad filters/seals have caused this for others. On my bike, there is zero oil residue around the filter or the drain plug, which rules out the easiest resolution :\ . All the residue that I'm seeing is up at the front of the engine instead of at the rear. I also checked the air filter and commonly leaky tubes, but all surfaces on the rear, side and top of the engine are oil-free.

It almost looks like it's coming from the seam between the starter and the block/case. However, I can't tell for sure since the wind just spreads the oil as soon as it leaks out of wherever it comes from. Just below the starter appears to be a regulator/rectifier which I have not yet removed to get a better visual - it could be originating there as well.

TLDR; slow oil leak near the starter on the front of the engine. Has anyone else encountered this before?
 

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Have you checked the oil cooler connections? The oil level? You do know to check the oil level, you come back from a ride over a half hour, let the bike set on the side stand for a spell and then slowly raise it to vertical and slowly lower it back onto the stand. Then you can check it. It might have been over filled.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well... this is embarrassing. I pulled about 1/2 quart out with a vacuum pump and the dipstick is barely below the full line now.

The dealer reported an oil change when they got it in and I haven't put enough miles on it for the next oil change yet. The color of the oil is about what I expect to come out of my diesel too. I assumed the dealer did what they said, and did it properly. Bad on me for not checking it.

Now that I've put ~2,500 miles on an overfilled engine, we'll see what damage has been done. I've read mixed reports on what may or may not be damaged, namely various seals. I'll be changing the oil when my kit arrives in the next 2 days, then see if the leak continues.

Happy 4th of July!
 

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Have you checked the oil cooler connections? The oil level? You do know to check the oil level, you come back from a ride over a half hour, let the bike set on the side stand for a spell and then slowly raise it to vertical and slowly lower it back onto the stand. Then you can check it. It might have been over filled.
??????????Shouldn't bike be vertical to check the oil??????????
 

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Discussion Starter #5
??????????Shouldn't bike be vertical to check the oil??????????
Yes, but I think there is misunderstanding: he's explaining how to check it with one person. By slowly tilting the bike to vertical then setting it back on the kickstand, this will let the oil 'mark' the dipstick and allow the oil to be checked with only one person (instead of a second person holding the bike vertical while another person checks the dipstick).
 

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You didn't hurt anything and I bet you have a lot of blow by in the air filter area so don't be surprised to get some drips on the back cylinder.
 

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Here's another trick to make checking the oil level easy peasy. When you know you have the correct level, park the bike on the side stand and the next day - when the engine is cold - remove the dipstick, wipe it off and replace it. Note: readings are taken with the dipstick screwed in. Remove the dipstick again and with a triangular file, or similar tool, carve a line at that oil mark on both sides of the dipstick. Now you can take level readings with a cold engine and the bike on the side stand.
 

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My selling dealer did my 500 mile service as part of the deal on the bike. He really didn't do crap but he did overfill my oil by 1.5 quarts. I didn't know this till half way doing 75 down the interstate I felt something warm on my left leg. Oil was coming out of the top of the primary! I got it home, let it cool down and used a turkey baster to remove oil till it got to the correct level. I never went back to that dealer and now since the closing of Victory he is the only dealer left who will do warranty work and sell parts in my area.
 

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You could put a 2X4 under kickstand and take your reading.

Here is a tip for you. With bike vertical just stick oil dipstick in hole. Now pull it out and read it. Oil should be on the add mark.
That is the same distance as if you screwed it in and then out. If on add mark it is full.


If my grammer is not correct. Mr Perfect VCC14 will correct it for me
 

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oh that smell! Tip

Another tip for those with a nose for oil. First part of July was coming back home from southern Arizona. Along I-10 freeway I thought I smelled oil. Figured it was a car in front of me or to the side. Got home checked the oil. It was low. Got to checking. Found the PCV or crankcase vent tube had split. The one that comes off the top of your crankcase behind the rear cylinder. You follow that tube up and on the X bikes it goes into the top of the main frame were it is sucked into the engine. The tube hooks to a 90-degree rubber elbow at the top. The rubber elbow is very thin/very cheap, less than a 1/16" thick the way I remember. I went down to O-Reillys or AutoZone. I bought a PCV hose for a Chrysler product, it was about a foot long with a 90-degree elbow on one end. Cut off the elbow end and stuck it on the bike. The one for a car is much thicker, maybe 1/4". Keep this in mind on a trip if you smell oil, my bike was over a quart low when I got home.
:eek:
 

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Always check your rubber thingies for leaks fellas.
 

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Broken rubbers

They can be expensive by the law up to 18-years. Oh yeah the heat gets to rubbers and can cause leakage/breakage.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the input, all.

The bike feels (and smells) much better today. Overall engine noise is down, particularly tapping when cold and top-end chatter at speed. No more oil smell when putting load on the engine and it doesn't look like any more oil has worked it's way out.

My oil change kit arrived today. It'll be changed shortly, then I'll give it keep an eye to see if any more oil finds it's way out of the engine - I'll post an update later on, just in case anyone in a similar situation stumbles on this thread later on.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Just an update (~2+ weeks from last post).

I did an oil change and, well, I certainly understand how the dealer over-filled it before me (calls for 4.5 quarts, I put in 4 and was still about 1/2 quart over-filled). I've had vacuum-pumped out the extra and it's running okay - top-end noise is still down significantly but not gone, exterior oil residue and smell is still decreased, but low-end knocking at idle persists before the engine warms up.

Tonight I replaced the camshaft cover gasket with a Lloydz reusable gasket. Install wasn't difficult (though I'm still wary of the torque specs), but we'll have to give it some time to see if the leak is resolved or not. I suspect it will cease but the knocking will persist.

As before, for the purposes of other people potentially finding this post down the road, I'll post another update in a few weeks.
 

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One of the many things I like about Rotella T-6 is it starts cold at 5W which makes for speedier flowing, especially to the lifters. I used to get lifter tapping on cold starts with 20-40, plus other banging sounds, but with T-6 all has smoothed out in a second or two.
My system for adding oil after a drain out is to prime the filter before installing it, add 4 quarts, then after coming back from a ride, check the level and add accordingly. Your post #14 leaves me (and maybe others) with a lot of unanswered questions. Such as; How can only 4 quarts be a half quart overfilled?
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Your post #14 leaves me (and maybe others) with a lot of unanswered questions. Such as; How can only 4 quarts be a half quart overfilled?
I made some oil change mistakes because I assumed I could do an oil change just like my Honda Magna: I did the oil change on a lift on a slightly slanted garage floor. The slant of the garage floor would have resulted in a small amount of oil pooling towards the back of the oil pan. The bigger mistake was putting the bike on a lift instead of draining the oil on the kickstand. Those two things resulted in (what I guess to be) 1/2 to 3/4 a quart of old oil remaining in the engine.

Thinking about it now, my last post was inaccurate: after putting 4 quarts in, I ultimately removed about 240ml which is about 1/4 quart.

TLDR; I accidentally didn't drain ALL of the oil when I did the oil change.
 

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Lessons learned the hard way, eh? It's such a PITA to check the oil level with the bike vertical, so here's what some of us have done. Once we've established that we have the correct level hot, park the bike on the side stand overnight and the next day take a cold reading and file a mark on the dipstick accordingly. From then on, you can do either hot or cold oil level checks.
 

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most of the big motor builders say use 4 1/4 quarts. They say you don't need 4 1/2.
 

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Lessons learned the hard way, eh? It's such a PITA to check the oil level with the bike vertical, so here's what some of us have done. Once we've established that we have the correct level hot, park the bike on the side stand overnight and the next day take a cold reading and file a mark on the dipstick accordingly. From then on, you can do either hot or cold oil level checks.
I would say this is one of the best things I have picked up here. Man does it make it soooo much easier than trying to level out and check. Plus if your out on a cross country trip and want to check the oil on a preride check for the day you dont have to find a rock or something to level it out. I normally drain oil, change the filter (I use the longer WIX). Then level up and add 4 quarts and start. After it runs a couple minutes shut it off and give it chance to settle down, then top off. I think last time I may have got it a tic to much as I seem to have gotten an apearence of oil from the top that is running down the head. My RSV use to do this when a bit to full. It would push excess out the air breather. I am guessing this one is same story.
 

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Don't forget to prime the new filter (fill it about 2/3 with fresh oil) immediately before putting it on. Otherwise, there is a lag in the system while the filter fills.
 
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