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Discussion Starter #1
Hi was getting bike out thanksgiving day for a short last ride it had sit for a month or so.I started it which it rolled over slow I figured battery down was running backed out of garage and went to turn handle bars hard to the right and bike stalled then there was nothing radio and lights still on but nothing at start button.Kept trying to start it moved bars back and forth finnaly started ! But when I turn bar full to left and full to right bike stalls and when I try to start wont no fuel pump running either when I turn key on so I'm lost bad wire in faring? need help thanks Rick.
 

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First thing is to check your batter terminal connections. They can get loose and cause all kinds of weird problems. It is probably either a bad connection, a very weak battery, or another connection that is starting to short out but I bet it is the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
the bike sat for a month or so and hasn't run so I'm sure battery prolly down and it's a 2010 don't know if its had a battery or not plan on getting new one for next year I didn't know if it was some sort of anti theft or what just was strange!
 

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Check your circuit breaker also. My bike started to run like crap when the battery was going out, then a low voltage code flashed on the LCD display. The terminals and circuit breaker are easy to check
 

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When I first got mine found there are two main harnesses and one would come unplugged slightly when you turned bars to one side. I took fairing off and moved bars full lock to full lock and then cut the tyes and put new ones one so it wasn't unplugging. Hope that helps.
 

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I've never been a fan of the wiring quality on a Vic.

As others have indicated, check the obvious and easy stuff first. Turning the handlebars would not have a direct effect on the battery connections because neither stretch that far but it's still a good place to start. Make sure it is fully charged, operating properly and all connectors at both ends are solidly terminated. While you've got the proper tools out, check and clean the connectors and mounting bolts on the regulator as well. (just because)

As it is an intermittent problem I imagine you will have to get a bit more involved by checking connectors in the fairing and tank areas. It's very easy to do. You aren't making any modifications or strange repairs, you are simply opening and reconnecting the plugs.

All of them should have locking tabs so make sure they are disconnected properly to avoid any damage. You are primarily looking for a loose connection but also take a close look at the pins, both male and female, for any kind of discolouration that could be corrosion. If you find any, clean them. Also add dielectric grease to all the pins before you plug them back together.

With everything apart, turn the handlebars back and forth and look for obvious problems. Also look for locations the wire moves and rubs against another part of the bike. There may be a bit of worn insulation which could also be a source of both the stalling and low battery instances you are experiencing. If you do see any potential problem areas they need to be inspected closer for physical damage.

As an FYI I had a headlight that would flicker while riding and sometimes at start-up wouldn't come on at all until it got a good whack. It came down to a connector on the aftermarket VictoryHID ballast not fitting into the stock connector as tight as a sealed connector should . It was locked in alright, it's just a mismatched plug that loosely fits and wobbles. A bit of tape fixed it up and it now works fine. That's the kind of stuff to look for.

Hopefully the problem is fixed with this minor amount of troubleshooting. Anything more advanced would need more resources and knowledge on the system. If you have that ability then go for it. It's a good time of the year to have the bike down although depending on your weather, you may not get the opportunity to test it out on the road.

If your problem was found and fixed and before you put everything back together, if during your earlier inspection you found any locations that had wiring moving against another part, it needs addressing. You need to isolate the wiring with cable ties/electrical tape/loom sheathing, whichever is appropriate for the situation.

Good luck and let us know how you make out.
 

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Once you get the problem sorted out, here are some tips I use to make life easier for bike, engine and battery when taking her out for those cold day rides.
+ You never know when the ride will be so keep a stabilizer in the fuel. I put a bottle in my case and stop to fill up on the way home and put some in with the gas. By the time I'm home, it'll be all through the fuel system to prevent fuel separation and the damage that ethanol does.
+ Hook up an automatic trickle charger to the battery. That will prevent the damage a cold start-up will do to a low battery and make it last a lot longer. I'm still on the original battery that's almost 6 years old.
+ At least a half hour prior to taking off, I place a room heater near the engine to warm up the engine, the oil and the battery for a much easier start.
 

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My battery is 5 years old and is still starting fine. I also put mine on a trickle charger but only 1 day a week during the winter. My garage is semi heated (routed a vent to it) and rarely gets below 50 degrees in the middle of winter so I am sure that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
thanks for all the info I will be looking into it when I get time going to be deer season here I western pa sotime will be limited but have all winter to get it done also want to do timing wheel while winter is here thanks again Rick!
 
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