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Guys

I am planning a trip to Alaska next year so any advice on this or places to get information on this type of adventure is appreciated.

I tried several travel bags last year and couldn't get any to easily strap to the passenger backrest (vic lock and ride model). I also will need to strap on a can of fuel at some point during the ride. Anyone have advice on how to do this with the XC? I don't have the trunk or the luggage rack but willing to spend the money as needed. I do have the utopia drivers back rest which is awesome and is staying on the bike.

Thanks
JH
 

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I haven't had a need to add a tank but if I did the Tour Tank looks like the cleanest install I've seen. It's NOT the cheapest but that isn't always a bad thing...especially when you are adding combustibles :eek:

The plumbed systems run from $179 to $199 for 2 to 4.75 gallons.
Here is kinda how it would look


Here are the installation instructions
First, you should never install a Tour Tank and take off on a long trip. You need to test out the Tour Tank install to make sure it works properly for the bike and for you, the rider. Get the Tour Tank a few weeks before you need it, take your time to insure you mount it securely and then test in on a ride in your area.

The most difficult part of installing your tank is deciding where and how to mount the tank. If you have a rear rack it helps a lot. The brackets each have 2 holes about 3/8-inch diameter, use 5/16 bolts, and about 4.75-inches apart. Once you have decided where to mount the tank you must make sure you mount it securely. There are
so many different bikes and different ways to mount a Tour Tank that it is impossible to cover them. If you need help contact a motorcycle shop in your area.

On a carbed bike it is pretty easy to tie into your fuel system with a T-Fitting by splicing into your bike's fuel line between the main tank and carb(s). You'll need an in-line valve to control the flow of gas from the Tour Tank as well as other fittings, which most are included in our connection kits.

Fuel injected bikes are best served by taking your main tank to a pro weld shop and have them weld a 1/4NPT threaded bung in the bottom of your tank. Then thread in a brass fitting into the bung and hook the Tour Tank fuel line to that fitting. The Tour Tank gas will go to the main tank and use the factory fuel pump.

Also note that Tour Tanks have a Vent tube or a Rollover valve vent.
You need to connect a fuel hose to the Vent tube/Rollvover valve and connect the other end of the hose to a catch tank or your factory charcoal canister.
If you don't want to have your tank mod'd they also sell sealed gas 1/2 Gallon canisters for $109.00 Plus $12.00 Shipping
 

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Check in with Steve Rolland, Franklin, WI. He's been to Alaska with a Kingpin and a Vision. See: http://www.wisconsinmotorcycling.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=4294&start=0 Listened to him at the 2012 AVR about his trip from the Florida Keys to Prudhoe Bay Alaska (in 15 days, he rode from WI to the Keys, to Alaska, and back to WI!!) The web reference shows the auxilliary tank used on the Kingpin ride.
 

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If you are riding one up check out Saddleman's back seat bag. Unless you are making the trip up the haul road to Prudhoe Bay, you shouldn't need to carry extra fuel. I only went as far as the Arctic Circle, but was fine without an extra fuel can. Guess I should add that I made the trip in 09. I suppose some of those gas stops could be closed. Some rest stops had hand outs of which stations were open that year as some has closed. I'm betting that if you gas when you can, you won't have a problem with having enough fuel.
 

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If you don't want to have your tank mod'd they also sell sealed gas 1/2 Gallon canisters for $109.00 Plus $12.00 Shipping
Another option for the above canisters is MSR. They making camping equipment and sell different sized bottles for stove fuel. These stoves will run off many different types of fuel so storing gasoline wouldn't be a problem. The below link is for a 30 oz bottle for $19.99 from REI.

http://www.rei.com/product/783963/msr-fuel-bottle-with-crp-cap-30-fl-oz




A lot of the BMW GS folks carry extra fuel this way. Here are a few images. Please let us know what you decide to do. May need to modify my bike this way in the future.






 

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Come on people...your thinking way to hard on how to carry stuff...
 

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Carry low.

Personally the ones on twisted throttle look great to me. I would personally try and carry the fuel as low as possible,especially on slick road surfaces like you could encounter in Alaska. Would not want extra weight up high, such as a large extra fuel tank or extra strap on luggage. I would even consider carrying extra fuel in good containers in the bottom of the stock saddle bags. If you had to you could then strap extra light items up on rear passenger seat or rear rack or in a trunk. Years ago when they were rationing gas in California I strapped a gallon can of gas on the back of the backrest/luggage rack of an old Honda I had when I went on a long trip, I could feel the extra weight up high on that little bike.---Victory makes some small rack for the tops of the saddlebags,kinda pricey. I found some small black ones on ebay for much less, around $50,still got to mount them though( I believe they might have been for a Kawasaki). Sounds like a great trip.thumb up
 
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