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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok...I am EXTREMELY new to motorcycles, especially a high end cruiser such as Vics. So I have some extremely noob questions, hopefully I'm in the right place. To get an idea of how new I am at this, refer to this thread: http://www.victoryforums.com/showthread.php?t=9215&page=2, refer to post 13. If elementary questions annoy you, move on and don't waste your time here. Trust me, I've administered forums where noobs show up knowing nothing and I know it can be annoying. But you gotta start somewhere right? That being said...here goes:

1. Filling gas. Is there a way to fill your tank without little tiny spatters of gas shooting out all over your tank?

2. Noises. I very recently purchased a brand new 2012 Vegas 8Ball, as recent as the 26th. Seems like everyday I notice a new noise on my bike. Sometimes when it's cold and I'm warming it up, sometimes going down the road. For instance, when warming up there seems to be an occasional "chirp" (for lack of a better description) coming from the exhaust. So I would like to know what things to listen for...what is normal, what is not.

3. Deceleration and Acceleration: Difficult to explain, but bear with me. Ok..so say I'm in second gear, maybe third. Cruising down the road obviously at a slower speed, I fully let off the throttle for a sec for whatever reason and NOT disengaging the clutch. Now I want to speed back up, so staying in the current gear I apply the throttle and hear a something that sounds like gears engaging...sort of a clunk. Not stupid loud, but it's there. Normal??

4. When I first got the bike, let it warmed up, then when I put in gear (1st) it was a loud shift. Like it was letting me know "Ya...I'm ready buddy". This morning and this afternoon, just a regular small click into first after warm up. The rest of the ride though it gave the noise I was used to going into 1st. Normal??Disregard, I found the answer to this one

That's pretty much it for now. I do have more questions but will save them for later. I need to learn this ****, and don't want to be overly paranoid...but what can I say, I absolutely love this bike and want it operating tip top. If something is wrong I want to deal with it yesterday.

I'm pretty mechanical so don't be afraid to talk in mech talk. I've worked on cars, construction, software programming, and other various vocational aspects where you have to "figure it out" my whole life. So I'm good with tech jargon. Bring it on.

For those that took the time to read and help me out...a big thanks to you. I'm sure the knowledge around here is invaluable and I'm sure there will be someone that doesn't mind putting up with elementary, inane questions.

Thanks so much for your time.

Junk
 

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1. YES. But a McCuff or keep a paper towel in your free hand to control splatter.

2. You are going to hear noises as with all engines. Take a ride under the hood of your car and you'll see what I mean. Discuss any noises that increase as you ride with your dealer when you go in for your 500 mile service.

3. It's probably a combination of luggin and the neutral finder. DOn't worry unless it gets louder and try not to cruise under 2700 RPM (shift at 3300 RPM - you should drop about 600 RPM per gear).

4. Clunking - Yes, you are swinging a lot of weight. Gear noise (loud humming) NO - if you hear it and it doesn't go away you may have an compensator issue (no sweat there's a fix).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
perfect ammo. Thanks so much!thumb up

I'll keep an ear on things. So far though it sounds like normal stuff going on, engine, tranny breaking in etc.

You rock,
Thanks again!

J
 

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Push the nossle of the filler to the left and you won't have any little splatters. And your exhaust might have a loose clamp right where slip on meets header so you might wanna check it out and the rest of the noises are pretty much normal. Like Ammo said if they get Lauder mention it to the service guys during your first check up or don't even wait just ride it in and let them have a listen.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Push the nossle of the filler to the left and you won't have any little splatters. And your exhaust might have a loose clamp right where slip on meets header so you might wanna check it out and the rest of the noises are pretty much normal. Like Ammo said if they get Lauder mention it to the service guys during your first check up or don't even wait just ride it in and let them have a listen.
Thanks a lot Bad. I didn't really have any time to check or go over much since I purchased the bike. Bought it Monday night and have been working all week. So this weekend we are going to spend some quality time together. I plan on going over every nut and bolt to make sure everything is nice and tight. The chirp I occasionally hear does sound like a loose clamp though now that you mention it.

Great replies, and they are VERY appreciated!

J
 

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Ok...I am EXTREMELY new to motorcycles, especially a high end cruiser such as Vics. So I have some extremely noob questions, hopefully I'm in the right place. To get an idea of how new I am at this, refer to this thread: http://www.victoryforums.com/showthread.php?t=9215&page=2, refer to post 13. If elementary questions annoy you, move on and don't waste your time here. Trust me, I've administered forums where noobs show up knowing nothing and I know it can be annoying. But you gotta start somewhere right? That being said...here goes:

1. Filling gas. Is there a way to fill your tank without little tiny spatters of gas shooting out all over your tank?

Yes, stand on opposite side of the kickstand and fill with nozzle point to left/back side of the tank.

2. Noises. I very recently purchased a brand new 2012 Vegas 8Ball, as recent as the 26th. Seems like everyday I notice a new noise on my bike. Sometimes when it's cold and I'm warming it up, sometimes going down the road. For instance, when warming up there seems to be an occasional "chirp" (for lack of a better description) coming from the exhaust. So I would like to know what things to listen for...what is normal, what is not.

Check your exhaust connections.

3. Deceleration and Acceleration: Difficult to explain, but bear with me. Ok..so say I'm in second gear, maybe third. Cruising down the road obviously at a slower speed, I fully let off the throttle for a sec for whatever reason and NOT disengaging the clutch. Now I want to speed back up, so staying in the current gear I apply the throttle and hear a something that sounds like gears engaging...sort of a clunk. Not stupid loud, but it's there. Normal??

It's backlash in the transmission. It's normal.

4. When I first got the bike, let it warmed up, then when I put in gear (1st) it was a loud shift. Like it was letting me know "Ya...I'm ready buddy". This morning and this afternoon, just a regular small click into first after warm up. The rest of the ride though it gave the noise I was used to going into 1st. Normal??Disregard, I found the answer to this one

It's normal also.

That's pretty much it for now. I do have more questions but will save them for later. I need to learn this ****, and don't want to be overly paranoid...but what can I say, I absolutely love this bike and want it operating tip top. If something is wrong I want to deal with it yesterday.

I'm pretty mechanical so don't be afraid to talk in mech talk. I've worked on cars, construction, software programming, and other various vocational aspects where you have to "figure it out" my whole life. So I'm good with tech jargon. Bring it on.

For those that took the time to read and help me out...a big thanks to you. I'm sure the knowledge around here is invaluable and I'm sure there will be someone that doesn't mind putting up with elementary, inane questions.

Thanks so much for your time.

Junk
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Awesome Plowtown! These are exactly the answers I'm looking for.

All of you, I really appreciate you answering these questions. I know they're uber basic, and I think it's great you all are taking time to school me, budda knows I need it.

"Wissen ist Macht"
(Knowledge is power)

J
 

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Junk,
When you get a chance please add your details (I.e. location, model/year) to your profile (user cp). This gives people a way to see what you ride so if they have hints/tips/similar issues they can chime in. Your location helps because it may get you some riding buddies and will make it easier for people to find you help (let you know where you can get something fixed).

I'm a little baffled; I can honestly say I've never seen the word "uber" with a reference to "budda". Also I pretty much forgot German so I can't respond to your statement in German but I would add a little: knowledge is power but unlike power you can't have too much.
 

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Junk, what is your riding skill? I just got a V92TC and I found it to be huge! And my last bike was a goldwing!

Just curious how many miles/hours/years you have in the saddle.
 

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Ok...I am EXTREMELY new to motorcycles, especially a high end cruiser such as Vics. So I have some extremely noob questions, hopefully I'm in the right place.
It would help by telling us what you ride and where you ride it.
 

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You're this new and bought a powerhouse like this? Someone steered you in a very dangerous direction. My advice... park it, borrow or buy a 250 and get some training before you get yourself in over your head.

Sure bad stuff can happen on a 250, but any possibility is extremely amplified when you add all the power that our bikes have, not to mention the weight in low speed drills. Even something as elementary as not grabbing the front brake with the bars turned at very low speeds (causes bike to drop like it is magnetically drawn to the ground)... or accelerating through a turn (never coasting or decelerating/braking) as it unsettles the suspension and can put you in the dirt.... these are things you need to learn before hitting the big bikes. Any choppy or "unsmooth" input made by you can lead to catastrophe on a bike like this.

Hit Amazon.com and buy these two DVD's as soon as you can:

Jerry "the motorman" Palladino's Ride Like a Pro 5 (no need to buy 1-4, they are encompassed in 5 with the new, added material)

Keith Code's A Twist of the Wrist 2

Viewing these and applying the techniques may well save your life. Even experienced riders walk away with new knowledge after viewing them.

PLEASE take an MSF course.

And for the love of God... buy QUALITY gear. Not a $150 helmet, $25 gloves and work boots. Especially while learning... you want all the protection that you can possibly get.



Another thing to keep in mind, most riders will lay down or drop their first bike. Do you really want to drop your expensive, shiny new Victory???? Even something as common, and stupid as forgetting to drop your kickstand before you get off can cost you as much as a grand in repairs. A woman ran me off the road into a curb... I was going less than 8mph and the bike went down: $4000 in damage.

Lay out $2000 or less on a used 250 and learn the right way, the safe way. And since so many people are always on the lookout for a cheap 250 to learn on, you can almost always sell it for about as much as you paid for it.

thumb up
 

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Answers inside your quote.........


1. Filling gas. Is there a way to fill your tank without little tiny spatters of gas shooting out all over your tank?

Sitting ON the bike, keeping it upright, not leaned over on the sidestand. This allows you to get more in (don't do this if you're not gonna burn off at least 20 miles because if you just go park it a few minutes later, you'll be too full, and have an overflow of gas).

With the pump to your RIGHT, if you have the nozzle placed at about the 11 o'clock position of the filler mouth, and only about an inch and a half in, you shouldn't get any splashback. (again, this applies to an upright standing bike). Go slowly, maybe 1/4 pull on the pump handle. It's a shallow tank, so full blast will always be met with splashback.


2. Noises. I very recently purchased a brand new 2012 Vegas 8Ball, as recent as the 26th. Seems like everyday I notice a new noise on my bike. Sometimes when it's cold and I'm warming it up, sometimes going down the road. For instance, when warming up there seems to be an occasional "chirp" (for lack of a better description) coming from the exhaust. So I would like to know what things to listen for...what is normal, what is not.

Can't help you there.


3. Deceleration and Acceleration: Difficult to explain, but bear with me. Ok..so say I'm in second gear, maybe third. Cruising down the road obviously at a slower speed, I fully let off the throttle for a sec for whatever reason and NOT disengaging the clutch. Now I want to speed back up, so staying in the current gear I apply the throttle and hear a something that sounds like gears engaging...sort of a clunk. Not stupid loud, but it's there. Normal??

Normal backlash of the drivetrain.

4. When I first got the bike, let it warmed up, then when I put in gear (1st) it was a loud shift. Like it was letting me know "Ya...I'm ready buddy". This morning and this afternoon, just a regular small click into first after warm up. The rest of the ride though it gave the noise I was used to going into 1st. Normal??Disregard, I found the answer to this one

All motorcycles do this to some degree, normal.

That's pretty much it for now. I do have more questions but will save them for later. I need to learn this ****, and don't want to be overly paranoid...but what can I say, I absolutely love this bike and want it operating tip top. If something is wrong I want to deal with it yesterday.

I'm pretty mechanical so don't be afraid to talk in mech talk. I've worked on cars, construction, software programming, and other various vocational aspects where you have to "figure it out" my whole life. So I'm good with tech jargon. Bring it on.

For those that took the time to read and help me out...a big thanks to you. I'm sure the knowledge around here is invaluable and I'm sure there will be someone that doesn't mind putting up with elementary, inane questions.

Thanks so much for your time.

Junk
 

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Discussion Starter #13
brace yourselves...it's a biggie

You're this new and bought a powerhouse like this? Someone steered you in a very dangerous direction. My advice... park it, borrow or buy a 250 and get some training before you get yourself in over your head.

Sure bad stuff can happen on a 250, but any possibility is extremely amplified when you add all the power that our bikes have, not to mention the weight in low speed drills. Even something as elementary as not grabbing the front brake with the bars turned at very low speeds (causes bike to drop like it is magnetically drawn to the ground)... or accelerating through a turn (never coasting or decelerating/braking) as it unsettles the suspension and can put you in the dirt.... these are things you need to learn before hitting the big bikes. Any choppy or "unsmooth" input made by you can lead to catastrophe on a bike like this.

Hit Amazon.com and buy these two DVD's as soon as you can:

Jerry "the motorman" Palladino's Ride Like a Pro 5 (no need to buy 1-4, they are encompassed in 5 with the new, added material)

Keith Code's A Twist of the Wrist 2

Viewing these and applying the techniques may well save your life. Even experienced riders walk away with new knowledge after viewing them.

PLEASE take an MSF course.

And for the love of God... buy QUALITY gear. Not a $150 helmet, $25 gloves and work boots. Especially while learning... you want all the protection that you can possibly get.



Another thing to keep in mind, most riders will lay down or drop their first bike. Do you really want to drop your expensive, shiny new Victory???? Even something as common, and stupid as forgetting to drop your kickstand before you get off can cost you as much as a grand in repairs. A woman ran me off the road into a curb... I was going less than 8mph and the bike went down: $4000 in damage.

Lay out $2000 or less on a used 250 and learn the right way, the safe way. And since so many people are always on the lookout for a cheap 250 to learn on, you can almost always sell it for about as much as you paid for it.

thumb up
I hear ya bandit, and I know where you're coming from. But honestly...I have received sooooooooooo much conflicting advice on this subject. People telling me to start out small, people saying that a 250 is unsafe on the freeway because it can't match average traffic speed, etc..

I will fill you in on the info from the thread I referenced in the first post, then elaborate a bit. I did start out on a Rebel 250, I did take the MSF course...and plan on taking the advanced course once I get 3k miles under my belt as per their requirement. Even the instructors there told me to get a bigger bike (yes I'm sure getting THIS big of a bike was not their intention). I actually kind of laughed that bit of advice off until I rode on the freeway for 20 to 30 minutes(my commute to and from work) for two weeks. My hips, knees shoulders and arms were cramped up every night when I go home. Not to mention people riding my ass in the slow lane of the freeway. Ya I got it up to 70, but in AZ....sorry buddy that just ain't fast enough. I would however take surface streets home. Took an hour, but I felt better about it.

Now the Vic. I didn't go for the power, I went for comfort. I needed something I could be comfortable on so I could stop worrying about getting in the right posture that would accommodate my ride, then let me concentrate on actually controlling the thing. I understood the potential ramifications of purchasing such a beast, but I also understand it's only going to be as powerful as I roll the throttle. So far that philosophy has rung true, and rest assured I have been taking it VERY easy on this bike, probably too easy actually. I went to a dealership that deals in almost every make. I sat on so many bikes looking for a comfortable position. Nothing could stand up to comfort compared to Victory...hands down. Harleys (these were the worst), any Honda (vtx, shadow, etc..), Kawasaki, Suzuki. The power the Vics posses is just a byproduct. Had they made a 6 or 800, I would have gone for that instead. But as far as I know, they don't. I was going for comfort and a VERY specific look. The Vic fit the bill. It also just happens to have a nuclear power plant driving it ;).

I don't really look forward to the day that I lay down my $12k bike, but I know its inevitable. I am prepared to deal with that, I accepted that going into this.

I'm not discounting your advice Bandit, I really appreciate you stepping up and lending your honest advice...tough love and all. But really man, I have this guy telling me this, that guy telling me that. With all that (conflicting) advice...nobody steered me in any direction. I had no other choice but to follow what I believe, which is what I've done my entire adult life and it's never let me down. I don't believe in god, the devil, Santa Claus, or any other being that humans have contrived throughout our history (don't want to start a religion discussion here, just my beliefs). What I DO believe in is me. I believe in myself and my ability to get this done, whether it's here on this board or not.

I hope this doesn't come across as harsh or crass, it is definitely not my intention. I just wanted to convey the reason for where I am now, and how I got here.

I also firmly believe that this post of mine has gotten entirely too long and I must wrap this up before any readers fall asleep or decide they need to make a sandwich or something.

Please know that as soon as I close this out, I will be ordering the DVDs you mentioned. Since the weekend is coming up, I will find a place I can go and work on slow speed control and maneuvers.

As Ammo suggested, I did go fill out some more personal info about myself. Haven't finished, but I will. I would like to find some riding buddies, but understand if seasoned riders don't want to ride with such a noob...I realize it could take some of the fun out. I have some work to do anyway on my own.

Thanks a lot guys/(gals?). I do appreciate the advice and will use it all.

@saddlebags...my bike is a vegas 8ball, and I'm in phx, AZ
 

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Your welcome on the advice.

I did sort of the same thing. Rode dirt bikes for a few summers as a kid and rode friends street bikes a few times. Went out and bought my Hammer a few months ago. No problems at all (though I live 20 miles from the closest town). Dragging pegs, 120mph, and 300 mile rides lots of times.
 

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@saddlebags...my bike is a vegas 8ball, and I'm in phx, AZ
You can go to the User CP link above and add that under "Edit Signature."

Sorry I haven't filled up a Vegas nor pumped gas in Az for that matter.

I will say that some states have evaporation mechanisms that impede a good pump. Fortunately, Ohio isn't one of them yet. I can pull the nozzle out and fill to the brim with no issue on most pumps. Every now and again I run into a pump that has no gradation and either wants to pump balls out or turn off. There is little one can do to prevent blow back when using those.

I will say that if Plowtown is right, that is just the opposite of how to add gas to the Cross bikes. I learned the hardway. I noticed they put the filler hole on the starboard side of the bike. I figured they meant for the bike to be filled from that side (i.e. the side opposite the kickstand).

After soaking the bike a couple of times I tried if from the kickstand side and found it to be the easiest bike to fill I've ever owned. I can stick the nozzle in and jack it on auto fill just like a car. I only need get involved to top it off.

As to the bike thing, I think you'll be fine. There are 500 cc sport machines that are faster. If you've taken the MSF and know and are proficient at the basics, you're already light years ahead of most riders.

One thing you may want to consider that may not be covered in MSF is lane position. One of the most frequent motorcycle accident situations is the left turning car. Often times I wonder where the rider was in the lane when these occur. Generally, it is better to ride near the center line than to the right and downright dangerous to tail gate taller vehicles. If you get hidden behind a tall vehicle and the driver sees a space between it and the next car, you can bet your paycheck his impatient butt will swing through it pronto.

I often swing the bike from side to side so that drivers approaching my lane from either side get a shot of headlight when proceeding into intersections.

If you are going to ride the center line, you need to be proficient at emergency swerving. With all the dimwits texting nonsense to their love interests these days, you can never be too good at this maneuver. It's an easy one to practice. Go out into the country. Get the bike up to about 60 mph while you're on the center line then practice a left counter steer to swerve the bike to the right. You'll want to start slow so you can gauge how much it takes to move the bike quickly to the other side of the lane.

Good luck and enjoy!
 

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Well you sound like you've got the right attitude and a good head on your shoulders, I think you'll do fine.

I hear you on the conflicting advice, everyone's an expert... just remember, the guys telling you to do things that sound like they could possibly be unsafe (like riding without proper gear, buy a more powerful bike, etc) are the ones to ignore :cool:

The videos are not only educational, but fun actually. On the Keith Code one, be warned... they use some really cheesy acting between lessons. But Keith is recognized as the leader in his field, producing a large number of professional, championship racers... he knows of what he speaks. Palladino is kinda funny, but gets his point across in a way that everyone can understand. When you apply his methods, you will become proficient.

One thing to remember... riding overly easy is as bad as riding beyond your limits. I say this with trepidation because it can easily be misunderstood. If you NEVER push yourself (KNOW your limits), then you'll never be prepared for an 'oh ****' moment down the line, and that can be bad. I try to learn something new each and every time I ride, and I most often do. This is why the chicken strips on my 250 rear tire are nonexistent (a Harley salesman was amazed... I ride mine to the very edge), and you'll see guys all day long, every day with tires half as skinny with 80% of their tire untouched... once you get comfortable, don't be afraid to really ride it!!! These bikes are made for performance.

I've seen too many people tragically hurt, so I do repeat this... investment in QUALITY gear is an investment in your life. What we do is inherently dangerous and we accept that when we get on the 1st time, but anything we can do to reduce the danger is good. A quality helmet (watch reviews on revzilla.com, helmetharbor.com or sportbiketrackgear.com), quality gloves, boots and jacket can be the difference between life & death... or some discomfort & a skin graft.

Read Brittany Morrow's story. She lived and has spent her life teaching others how to avoid her mistakes: http://sportbike.natkd.com/road_rash.htm
 

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I agree you'll be fine, Just take it slow and get used to the rear breaks on victory's. On my vegas I've locked up the front tire 2-3 times, always in traffic at low speeds.

I'm a newb too, been riding just over a year. In this time i have 2800 miles under my belt. Never dropped one, but have had "hairy" situations.

1st bike- Suzuki Gs500, paid $1000 and Driven 500 miles (miss this bike)


2nd bike - Yamaha Virago XV1100, paid $500 + broken Gs500 and Driven 400 miles (POS)


Current bike - 08 Vegas 8-ball, paid $9000 with 3k miles, added $900 worth of accessories. Driven 1900 miles in the past 3 months.


My learner bikes were cheap and cost about as much as the saddlebags,HIDs and seat ive installed. I think i chose the right route and learned i wanted a cruiser and not a rocket.
 

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Except for super slow maneuvering in very tight spaces, you should never even touch your rear brake.

And the only reason you use it then is to stabilize the bike by pulling against the brake when you're in the friction zone.


The key to proper brake use, and NOT locking up your tire (front or rear) is to squeeze the lever, never grab a fistful of brake. When you shock it "on", you'll lock up the brakes... it takes time and practice but soon you'll break yourself of the habit.

I had to do a panic stop a few days ago (police car zooming through the intersection I was entering) and went from 55 to zero in a heartbeat without locking up my brakes, or feeling as though I would be tossed over my bars.
 

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I totally agree with Bandit on the gear, limits, etc.

Make sure you check your tire pressure EVERY time you ride too.

I was extremely lucky as I had an uncle that lived on an 80 acre farm and bought out a big motorcycle shop that failed. I got a lot of experience by getting to ride tons of dirt bikes and some street bikes. Started on a XR80 and graduated to a CR500 by the time I got my drivers license at 16yrs old. Never laid down a street bike but laid down dirt bikes a lot. Learned a lot about riding trail riding and fast fire roads. The experience in slow tight trails helped a lot going to a street bike in low speed handling. My first ride on a street bike was on a Suzuki 1200(?) crotch rocket that he got in the inventory that had been dropped. He threw me the keys and said "its not like your going to hurt it". I'm just glad it never hurt me :ltr:

I spend half my time riding with sport bike/track day friends and the other half with friends that cruise on cruisers. I enjoy cruising most but my track day buddies help me hone my skills and safely find my limits.
 

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Except for super slow maneuvering in very tight spaces, you should never even touch your rear brake.

And the only reason you use it then is to stabilize the bike by pulling against the brake when you're in the friction zone.


The key to proper brake use, and NOT locking up your tire (front or rear) is to squeeze the lever, never grab a fistful of brake. When you shock it "on", you'll lock up the brakes... it takes time and practice but soon you'll break yourself of the habit.

I had to do a panic stop a few days ago (police car zooming through the intersection I was entering) and went from 55 to zero in a heartbeat without locking up my brakes, or feeling as though I would be tossed over my bars.

Maybe i said that wrong... i locked up my front tire with the front break, i didnt use the rear and went a little sideways. I have a vegas that means a skinny ass tire and de-tuned front breaks, single disc. I was told by the dealer/shop managers and saw some articles to use both breaks about the same..
 
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