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I took my first big step today and test rode the XCT and Magnum bikes today. Northway Sports in East Bethel MN is just a few miles from my house so I dropped in on my way home from work on my Road Glide. I rode the touring first which was totally stock. I hate to say it but I was not impressed. The engine lacked power and was much noisier than I expected. When I got on the throttle hard at 3000-4000 RPM in 5th & 6th the tack actually went backwards for a few seconds then caught back up and accelerated. The tour pack rattled and their was more vibration in the handle bars than my Road Glide at 70 mph. I want back & jumped on the Magnum expecting more rattles, vibration and engine noise. Well I must not have noticed any because I was twisting the throttle and carving out the twisties on the back roads with a vengeance! Granted this had the full stage 1 upgrades but what a difference it made. The corners were smooth with very little steering input compared to my RG. The power was more than I expected and the pipes sounded great and not too loud.
It really sank in how comfortable the bike was when I left on my Road Glide and the footboards felt cramped, the steering felt numb and less responsive, and the clutch felt limp compared to the crisp grab on the Magnum. I think I found something here...
 

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That sounds like a fair review. These bikes do need a couple little upgrades to make em run well. But just add a Lloyds air cleaner and adjustable timing wheel, freer flowing exhaust, and a fuel tuner, and they are a blast to ride and handle very well.
Welcome to the forum.
 

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I did the reverse and tested a StreetGlide yesterday as part of a comp to win a trip to the USA to ride Route66 (I'm an Aussie)
I can see why people like the Streetglide but I'm spoilt after 2 years and over 60,000 miles of Victory Vegas ownership.
I covered over 500 miles yesterday on the Harley, great grunt down low and plenty ground clearance but the thing felt clumsy and unbalanced, wallowed in fast bumpy corners and my woman or the back was almost in tears after a few hundred miles.
She refused to get back on it this morning.
I havent ridden an XR ,XCT, or Magnum yet to compare, I'm happy with my Vegas.
Victorys best!
 

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After putting my 106 back to stock due to "heat issue" from a non-factory stage 1 upgrade, I was really not happy with the sleepish performance. I decided to step it back up with a factory stage 1 kit....hopefully I won't reawaken the heat monster :crzy:
 

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After putting my 106 back to stock due to "heat issue" from a non-factory stage 1 upgrade, I was really not happy with the sleepish performance. I decided to step it back up with a factory stage 1 kit....hopefully I won't reawaken the heat monster :crzy:

If it does... Blame it on the dealer and make them fix it!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I did not notice any heat from the Magnum with the dealer installed stage 1. It was only 75 degrees during the test ride though.
 

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It really sank in how comfortable the bike was when I left on my Road Glide and the footboards felt cramped, the steering felt numb and less responsive
When non-motorcycle people ask me "Why didn't you buy a Harley?", I pretty much tell them this. When they say "But isn't Harley the best?", I say "It is for some folks, but not this folk". :)
 

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When non-motorcycle people ask me "Why didn't you buy a Harley?", I pretty much tell them this. When they say "But isn't Harley the best?", I say "It is for some folks, but not this folk". :)
I say something similar; why would I step down? I still love Harley's but I'm also disappointed in the MoCo as I've stated many times because they make an inferior engine and sell it at a premium price. It would not cost them much more to make their engines much more durable without so many weak links but they choose not to so I choose not to buy them anymore. I should have kept the 99' I had though. Except for the oil pump; all the weak links had been fixed in it. Only real drawback is it was a 5 speed.
 

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MN_Larry, I found it strange how rental and demo bikes can be so different from what everyone was telling me about Victories. I tried to fall in love with a Vision but every time I test rode or rented one they were so weird, weak, noisy, and windy, leaving me wondering if it was me or everyone else that was crazy. I felt that way up until I rode the bike I am on now (2010 Cross Country) which completely blew my socks off - like a completely different beast. I think maybe 'fleet' bikes are tuned and maintained to some very low standard, when with just a little attention they would exhibit totally different manners and a far more favorable reaction. I'm glad the Magnum made up for the XCT. Obviously both bikes share common DNA but it's the setup and minor tweaks that transform it into something memorable. If you should end up on a Victory in the future you'll find lots of support here. Good on you for having an open mind and best of luck in your search.

 

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When non-motorcycle people ask me "Why didn't you buy a Harley?", I pretty much tell them this. When they say "But isn't Harley the best?", I say "It is for some folks, but not this folk". :)
Kinda how I feel. I have no grudge or hatred of Harley or any other manufacturer, I bought what worked for me. I personally feel the Vic is more reliable, it is an opinion that's all. While I was down riding the 3 sisters in the Hill Country several Harley riders complemented my Vic' and you know what I returned the compliment, because their bikes were badass too!
 

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My brother-in-law has had 2 Harleys since 2007, a 1200 Sportster and a 2012 Fat Bob. Only problem he had was a rear wheel bearing, and I put stainless brake lines in for him. Other than that, he hasn't had a lick of trouble with them. I also have a pair of good riding buddies I meet every year in Lake George (I leave again tomorrow morning! :D) who have Ultra Classics and have also had zero issues. I really wanted one, but I didn't like the way I felt in the seat and at the controls.
 

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My brother-in-law has had 2 Harleys since 2007, a 1200 Sportster and a 2012 Fat Bob. Only problem he had was a rear wheel bearing, and I put stainless brake lines in for him. Other than that, he hasn't had a lick of trouble with them. I also have a pair of good riding buddies I meet every year in Lake George (I leave again tomorrow morning! :D) who have Ultra Classics and have also had zero issues. I really wanted one, but I didn't like the way I felt in the seat and at the controls.
One big advantage of an HD Ultra Classic over a Victory touring bike (XCT or Vision) is that you will feel a lot lighter and have more spring in your step if you buy the HD since your wallet will weigh so much less :)

G'day,

Vinish
 

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Perceptions must not be universal. My CCT is the smoothest best handling big bike I've ever rode and it hauls A$$ to me. I have two friends with 2015 street glides that I can pull away from. No rattles.
 

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My saddlebag lids rattle if I hit bumps, but that's about it.
 

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My two cents worth: I test rode the Ultra Classic before I bought my CCT and liked it a lot, but at 6'3" just couldn't get past how I fit so much better on the CCT. It felt like I was sitting on top of the Ultra and my shins were pinned to the lowers. I really wanted to like it and have nothing against HD. Many friends ride them. The CCT just seemed to be a better fit for me. (And I've never regretted the choice!)

Ah, but I'm not going to let Victory off the hook completely. Why can bike manufacturers continue to pretend that "one size fits all"? Surely they could make adjustable seats and handle bars to accommodate both short and tall riders. Yes, but then we wouldn't all be dumping significant dollars into mods afterward. (It appears I answered my own question. :rolleyes:)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The Cross Country is definitely more comfortable out of the box which leaves more dollars left over to spend on power:smile

I'm finding out how hard it is to sell a Harley touring bike with 29k miles on it. There is a lot of 2010-12 baggers for sale with half the miles or less and they want the same $$ do. I may need to drop down 1 or 2 grand but no more than that. I'd rather keep it and hope for the best next year.
 

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Why can bike manufacturers continue to pretend that "one size fits all"? Surely they could make adjustable seats and handle bars to accommodate both short and tall riders
I think all mfg's miss the mark bigtime for not doing this. Cross Country gets big points for making the floorboard controls adjustable...if they could add a couple inches front/back sliding action to the seat, and maybe an inflatable air bladder to adjust height, they would emerge as the brand to fit everyone universally - ergonomically at least...there'll never be a universal style fit which is why the aftermarket segment will always flourish. In the meantime, the market is ripe for vendors who create accessories which address those adjustability issues. Cases in point - Madstad windshield brackets and modular handlebars. Maybe manufacturers like Mustang or Corbin feel that developing an adjustable seat would harm their existing market but they should wake up because somebody's going to do it...
 

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Simple....it'd cost more to produce the bike and it'd put the price of the Victory up a coupla grand if they had all these extra things.
Infinite adjustability
State of the art suspension and brakes.
Victory's are built to a price that's affordable... If you're not happy with the bike you spend more
my bike fits me. Though I've lashed out on Burleigh Bars and a backrest.
Performance was fine but I'm paying for more.
I've upgraded suspension and brakes.
You get what you pay for.
 

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I took my first big step today and test rode the XCT and Magnum bikes today. Northway Sports in East Bethel MN is just a few miles from my house so I dropped in on my way home from work on my Road Glide..

When I first test road an XCT.. i was not really impressed when i forst left the dealers lot. It seemed kinda lame.. noisey, not spunk... then i noticed the mileage on it. I thought WTF.. this someobdys used bike ? So when I went back to the dealer i asked him why the bike had so many miles on it if it was new.. he said Oh it is a loaner and a test bike. So I said.. well can i ride a new Bike, like i would with a car.. he said no they dont like do to that. So I went to a dealer in another town an hour away and he let me drive one right off the showroom. He just told me not to take it to Daytona fore the test ride. Well this bike was totally different... I bought a bike from him.... not THAT one.. but a different color.
 

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Simple....it'd cost more to produce the bike and it'd put the price of the Victory up a coupla grand if they had all these extra things.
Infinite adjustability
State of the art suspension and brakes.
Victory's are built to a price that's affordable... If you're not happy with the bike you spend more
my bike fits me. Though I've lashed out on Burleigh Bars and a backrest.
Performance was fine but I'm paying for more.
I've upgraded suspension and brakes.
You get what you pay for.
Sorry I disagree (if we're really talking about the same things). I don't believe for a second that it costs Victory more to make their floorboards & controls adjustable. It cost them up-front R&D, and engineering time, yes, but once developed, the parts are just mass produced like every other part on any vehicle. Putting an equal amount of effort into designing even modest adjustability into any other systems is a one-time expense that would be more than offset by increased sales from a broadened market base. Fit more people - make more sales - make more money - be more competitive.
 
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