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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone change their own tires? I've considered buying a bead breaking bar set to do my own since it seems a bit overkill expensive to have them done.
Is this easily done or is it with the newer tires that it would just be too difficult to do it on the garage floor?
 

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Anyone change their own tires? I've considered buying a bead breaking bar set to do my own since it seems a bit overkill expensive to have them done.
Is this easily done or is it with the newer tires that it would just be too difficult to do it on the garage floor?
I take the wheel of and bring them to a shop.
 

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I started changing my bike tires...ONCE. After 2 hrs of sweating, swearing, and lots of bruised fingers, I got one tire off of one wheel. I realized that the ~$30 per tire that an independent shop charged me to remove the old tire, install the new tire, and spin balance the new tire/wheel was well worth it. If you do attempt this yourself, make sure to get the necessary tools and rim protectors.
 

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...I realized that the ~$30 per tire that an independent shop charged me to remove the old tire, install the new tire, and spin balance the new tire/wheel was well worth it...
^
This.

I do various service related as well as 'improvements' to my scoot myself. However, at some point you have to ask yourself about certain jobs if the hassle and the time it will take is really worth what the indy will charge.
 

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I started changing my bike tires...ONCE. After 2 hrs of sweating, swearing, and lots of bruised fingers, I got one tire off of one wheel. I realized that the ~$30 per tire that an independent shop charged me to remove the old tire, install the new tire, and spin balance the new tire/wheel was well worth it. If you do attempt this yourself, make sure to get the necessary tools and rim protectors.
As well as assorted splits and bandages.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
excellent point guys.... might as well let the fellas with the proper tools do the work.
 

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I normally take my wheels off and take them and my new tires to a dealer to get them done. I use a reliable Yamaha dealer to do this that I have been using for over ten years but do not trust them to know all the torques and procedures on a victory bike, and I want to know that it is done according to the Manuel. However, the last time a few months ago when I replaced both front and back tires I decided to mount them myself and did a lot of research on U-tube etc. You will need some basic tools and a lot of patience without the proper equipment but is is doable and you know it is done right.
 

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I started changing my bike tires...ONCE. After 2 hrs of sweating, swearing, and lots of bruised fingers, I got one tire off of one wheel. I realized that the ~$30 per tire that an independent shop charged me to remove the old tire, install the new tire, and spin balance the new tire/wheel was well worth it. If you do attempt this yourself, make sure to get the necessary tools and rim protectors.
I agree. Tried myself with those tools and I won't do anymore hand tire changes.
 

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The first time is the most difficult and most educational. I bought a Harbor Freight tire changer with motorcycle adapter several years ago and did a few modifications to the adapter to make it the way it should have been when it came out of the box. Also bought a Mojo lever at the same time. I mounted the changer to a concrete pad next to my garage so I don't have to worry about it getting in the way. When I changed my first set I thought I was going to die. But I learned a few tricks and since then have changed several sets on my Triumph Rocket III Touring, one set on a BMW K that I had and one set for my Road King. Have not done the Vision's tires yet but do not see a big difference -- they are round, too. :) It gives me some enjoyment doing stuff to my bikes and I
usually learn a thing or two while I am at it.
 

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Been doing mine for years. Tube type more a pia. I'm old school. 2x6 wedged under like truck hitch with a 2x4 piec to push bead down. Need to put a couple board under tire to keep disc from bending. Then spoon it off. I use balance beads, no weights.
 

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Bravo to the tire R&R guys! I'm not worthy. Used to do that when I was younger, but those 16" rims just wore me out. For those new to the rear wheel R&R, keep in mind that if your belt is adjusted correctly there is no need to include readjustment with the R&R. Leave the adjusters tight, slide out the axle, drop the wheel, get new rubber and reverse. LMAO when I saw a guy do that after going through the whole rigamarole for years.

Ride safe.
 

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I replaced my rear tire back in December. I took the wheel off and took it to cycle gear. If you buy the tire from them the mounting costs $25, for an additional $25 you get a road hazard warranty. I know the guy at my local cycle gear that does the work and he is a good dude that spends his free time racing motocross and working in a pit crew for super-cross and moto-gp. He takes the time to tape up the wheels to be sure there are no oops.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I always order my tires on-line at much cheaper prices and then the shops want to charge extra for mounting since you didn't buy it from them so I thought if I spent some money on good equipment it would pay off but..... I took my new front wheel and tire in to a new shop I've only gone to a couple times. Told them mounting only no balance because I will use Dyna beads. Cost $20 - wasn't expecting that! Forget mounting my own tires! lol Told them I'd be back with the rear soon.
 
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