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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I started at 1:30 and got done at 9:00. It was a PAIN IN THE ASS. I can't believe how hard it was to break the beads on these things. I bought a cheap bead breaker and ended up bending it. Ran to Harbor Freight to get a better one.

I hated the way the OEM Dunlop E3s felt. Horrible on tar snakes. Bought a set of Bridgestone tires, the same ones for the GoldWing - G704 and G709

Removal of the front wheel was cake. Removing the tire from the wheel was something else entirely. Just when I thought that bead wouldn't break, it did.

The rear, however, was unbelievable. I pulled muscles I didn't think I had. I gave up 3 times. Just when I was going to give up for good, it went.
Another matter was putting the rear wheel back on. Ended up taking the brake pads out to do it.

All in all, I have new shoes on the bike. And I did it myself. Now, I hope they last 40,000 miles :)

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Now you can say you're retired.:)
At my age, I'm going to look for the least strenuous ways to do these sorts of things. To remove the rear wheel (bike on a lift) I placed a floor jack under the tire and applied just enough pressure to take the strain off the shock bolts. With those bolts removed, the jack was lowered until the swingarm stopped. Then applied pressure to take strain off the axle. Pulled the axle and lowered the wheel on the jack. To re-install the wheel the process is reversed. It helps to have someone operating the jack while you are under the bike. Pretty Wife was my helper with the jack.
 

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I use 2 heavy duty c clamps to break the beads loose, Getting the tire back on the last bead is another issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Now you can say you're retired.:)
At my age, I'm going to look for the least strenuous ways to do these sorts of things. To remove the rear wheel (bike on a lift) I placed a floor jack under the tire and applied just enough pressure to take the strain off the shock bolts. With those bolts removed, the jack was lowered until the swingarm stopped. Then applied pressure to take strain off the axle. Pulled the axle and lowered the wheel on the jack. To re-install the wheel the process is reversed. It helps to have someone operating the jack while you are under the bike. Pretty Wife was my helper with the jack.
I wanted to do that. However, I could not budge the shock bolts. So I ended taking off the left muffler.



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Discussion Starter #5

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I wanted to do that. However, I could not budge the shock bolts. So I ended taking off the left muffler.
When you're 77 years old, you'll be able to do it w/o removing a muffler, young 'un.
 

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E3's are a soandso, Stones aren't a lot better when it comes to replacing them on a rim.
Remember, you just lost about 170 pounds of rear tire load rating (ever wonder why wings eat tires). This may not make any difference if you and your pillion, if you ride with one, are light.
Side note: Stones were my favorite on the Wing, well, next to the Darkside tire.

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Discussion Starter #8
Interesting. No, we are far from light. But, now that I know how to change the tire, nothing stopping me from trying the dark side now :)


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Interesting. No, we are far from light. But, now that I know how to change the tire, nothing stopping me from trying the dark side now :)[/color]
Please Broggy don't do it, don't drink the Kool-Aid and put down that apple.:D
 

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i like doing my own work but NOT tire changes! i remove then + let my buddy a former duc dealer with a machine mount + balance them $50 + 30 minutes or less including conversation!! i am more concerned about what i could do to my rims.
 

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I've been in the tire biz for most of my adult life. And for 99.9% of those countless hundreds (thousands?) of tire installs, I've had the benefit of pneumatic tire machines. Probably not a cost-effective investment if you plant to only do your own rubber. It'd take a number of years to earn back that cost.

That said, despite my experience in tire work, breaking by hand is a frustrating exercise, and so is mounting by hand. I respect your follow-through Broggy, I'd have ended up hauling them down to the shop.

One thing that makes your life a lot easier tho, is some air tools. I couldn't budge the shock bolts by hand either. However, my impact wrench was able to supply sufficient persuasion.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I've been in the tire biz for most of my adult life. And for 99.9% of those countless hundreds (thousands?) of tire installs, I've had the benefit of pneumatic tire machines. Probably not a cost-effective investment if you plant to only do your own rubber. It'd take a number of years to earn back that cost.

That said, despite my experience in tire work, breaking by hand is a frustrating exercise, and so is mounting by hand. I respect your follow-through Broggy, I'd have ended up hauling them down to the shop.

One thing that makes your life a lot easier tho, is some air tools. I couldn't budge the shock bolts by hand either. However, my impact wrench was able to supply sufficient persuasion.
I was this --><-- close to breaking out the impact wrench. But I wasn't sure I wanted to put that much stress on those bolts. It's what I'll do next time.

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I was this --><-- close to breaking out the impact wrench. But I wasn't sure I wanted to put that much stress on those bolts. It's what I'll do next time.

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Yeah, I don't ever blame anyone for the "better safe than sorry" approach. But those are sturdy fastener and they're so hard to budge because they're fixed with locknuts, the kind with nylon collars on the end of the threads. But I'd say that's one place you don't want your fasteners coming loose.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Please Broggy don't do it, don't drink the Kool-Aid and put down that apple.:D
Mmmm. Apple-flavored kool-aid!
 

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I must be in better shape than some of you young guns. I loosened those shock bolts with a extra long 1/2" socket handle...maybe 18 or 20" long.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I must be in better shape than some of you young guns. I loosened those shock bolts with a extra long 1/2" socket handle...maybe 18 or 20" long.
That's my problem! I was using a 3/8 drive. My 1/2 drive is a bit longer. Didn't even occur to me to try it.
 

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That's my problem! I was using a 3/8 drive. My 1/2 drive is a bit longer. Didn't even occur to me to try it.
Us old guys have to show the way. :D
 

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Well ya didn't get old by being dumb. Mostly doesn't work out that way. :ltr:

Until the past couple of years one had to bring their game to keep up with my FIL, he is 86 now and other than can't hear is doing well for a guy about 65. LOL

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Discussion Starter #19
I agree. My dad will be 70 in October and he just finished redecking our deck.
 

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Broggy, tell your dad he's welcome to come out here for a "visit." I just happen to have a deck project he can "help" me with.
 
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