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This is my first FI motorcycle, 04 TC it runs great has plenty of power nice and smooth. It has enough power that I would give some of it up for better mpg. Can these bikes be tuned for fuel efficiency?

I don't fully understand "mapping" If I took my bike to the dealership I wouldn't even know what to ask for lol. Is mapping the same thing as tuning? Can it be fine tuned with out a fuel tuner?

When I bought the bike it had a Big Shot fuel tuner on it and I was getting 25 mpg I fooled around with it for about a week the best I could get was 35 mpg. I removed it and I'm getting 38 to 40 mpg now.
I can live with that but if it's possible to increase it even 5 mpg by having it remapped or tuned I'd do it even if it cost me some power, as long as it's not harmful to the engine.

As far as I know its completely stock the exhaust is pretty quiet I really don't know why it had the Big Shot installed. Thanks for any advice.
 

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Welcome to the very confusing world of fuel injection tuning. I have a lot of old school type friends who still struggle with some of the concepts, but I'll try to give you some overview of what it's all about.

As you may know, fuel injection is a computer driven process as compared to the mechanical process used in carburation. Instead of jets of varyious sizes that control the amount of fuel, a computer determines the amount of fuel by controlling the duration of the feed during the combustion process. Ultimately in fuel injection tuning you're trying to achieve an efficient and effective air to fuel ratio. In a well tuned bike this fuel ratio isn't constant throughout the RPM settings. It's typically leaner (less gas, more air) at lower RPM's and richer (more gas, less air) as RPM's increase. Lean settings can give you better fuel efficiency (and in a lot of cases better responsiveness) at the cost of higher temperatures with the opposite being the case with richer settings. A "map" is simply a table of values that defines how much fuel to feed for a given RPM and throttle setting.

With a fuel injection tuner you can easily change this map to suit your needs versus having to go to the dealer and have the ECU flashed. By and large injection tuning isn't about creating more overall horsepower as much as it is optimizing the power (responsiveness) for any given throttle/horsepower setting while balancing it against the heat produced by the combustion process and the mileage. Although it seems counter-intuitive, a richer setting actually makes the engine run cooler and that's why, in most maps, you'll see leaner settings at low rpm/throttle and richer settings as the rpm/throttle increases.

Those are the main concepts behind it all and the implementation of how it's done varies with different manufacturers of these injection tuners. The differences tend to be about how much precision and control you want over the tuning process. Products like Power Commander allow you to individually tweak almost every aspect while others like Cobra do it all for you automatically through some pre-determined logic, with other products allowing varying levels of control and automation.

I'd tell you more, but i can see your eyes are glazing over at this point just like some of my old school buddies...good luck.. :crzy:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok thanks like I said if that mpg is about right then good, I guess I'm just the opposite of the guy who wants to get 5 more horse power.
 

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mapping

While y'all are giving opinions..... I had them put exhaust on my white Cross Country Tour. It is about equal to, maybe a little louder than stage one.They said it didn't really have to be mapped because of all the automatic sensors.
Runs very well and mileage is around 37-40 depending on me.
The only thing that bothers me is it is rich and the pipes are really black, AND I have the very noticeable black spray on the back of the fender and saddlebags.
Any thoughts? It is not too hard to wipe down, and I bought it to ride, so it gets dirty. Just wondering if I need to follow up on anything.

Thank You
 

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Discussion Starter #7
dprevette this is a quote from another thread http://www.victoryforums.com/showthread.php?t=11891&page=2

Hi, I have an 08 Vision and use to run 91, I now run a lower octane. I would get black soot on the pipes, I took it to the dealer and everything checks out OK. People did not want to ride behind me because of the fumes and unburnt gas coming out. I was reading on this forum that had information on high octane and black soot on the pipes. I beleive Kevin said it, 91 burns slower and can send unburned fuel out the exhaust. I changed to a lower octane fuel to try it out, and got an increse in milage (3 to 5 depending on the thottle) and my pipes are now a gray color.
So if it does not knock you can use it.
I have level 1 pipes, LLoydz secondary air intake and IAV.
 

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While y'all are giving opinions..... I had them put exhaust on my white Cross Country Tour. It is about equal to, maybe a little louder than stage one.They said it didn't really have to be mapped because of all the automatic sensors.
Runs very well and mileage is around 37-40 depending on me.
The only thing that bothers me is it is rich and the pipes are really black, AND I have the very noticeable black spray on the back of the fender and saddlebags.
Any thoughts? It is not too hard to wipe down, and I bought it to ride, so it gets dirty. Just wondering if I need to follow up on anything.

Thank You
What pipes exactly did they put on for you without flashing the ECM or installing some kind of fuel controller? Did they simply disconnect the O2 sensors and leave it at that?

The black soot isn't something to be worried about per se because the bike goes into an enrichment mode for a certain amount of time or until the heads get to a certain temp. KevX could tell you exactly. Anyway; this causes that soot in the tail pipes. It's how it runs and what kind of mileage you are getting that I want to know.
 

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While y'all are giving opinions..... I had them put exhaust on my white Cross Country Tour. It is about equal to, maybe a little louder than stage one.They said it didn't really have to be mapped because of all the automatic sensors.
Runs very well and mileage is around 37-40 depending on me.
The only thing that bothers me is it is rich and the pipes are really black, AND I have the very noticeable black spray on the back of the fender and saddlebags.
Any thoughts? It is not too hard to wipe down, and I bought it to ride, so it gets dirty. Just wondering if I need to follow up on anything.

Thank You
The cats are gone that would have burned up the unburnt fuel. It is really not running rich. When you gun it some of the fuel is blown through the cylinder with out getting flamed. Fuel is from oil so that is why it is black. You could put the cats back in..cheers
 

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The cats are gone that would have burned up the unburnt fuel. It is really not running rich. When you gun it some of the fuel is blown through the cylinder with out getting flamed. Fuel is from oil so that is why it is black. You could put the cats back in..cheers
Does not say in his post that cats are gone, and cats do NOT burn fuel. As the name suggests. A catalytic converter uses a catalyst strata to convert some of the gass into a more harmless form, but a rich engine is rich with oro without them.
That said these things are basically air cooled and need a rich mixture to properly cool. So a little rich is just right
 

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A catalytic converter (colloquially, "cat" or "catcon") is an exhaust emission control device which converts toxic chemicals in the exhaust of an internal combustion engine into less toxic substances. Inside a catalytic converter, a catalyst stimulates a chemical reaction in which toxic byproducts of combustion are converted to less toxic substances by way of catalysed chemical reactions. The specific reactions vary with the type of catalyst installed. Most present-day vehicles that run on gasoline are fitted with a "three way" converter, so named because it converts the three main pollutants in automobile exhaust: an oxidizing reaction converts carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbons (HC), and a reduction reaction converts oxides of nitrogen (NOx) to produce carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen (N2), and water (H2O).[1]

The first widespread introduction of catalytic converters was in the United States market, where 1975 model year gasoline-powered automobiles were so equipped to comply with tightening U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations on automobile exhaust emissions.[2][3][4][5] These were "two-way" converters which combined carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbons (HC) to produce carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O). Two-way catalytic converters of this type are now considered obsolete, having been supplanted except on lean burn engines[citation needed] by "three-way" converters which also reduce oxides of nitrogen (NOx).[2]

Catalytic converters are still most commonly used on automobile exhaust systems, but are also used on generator sets, forklifts, mining equipment, trucks, buses, locomotives, motorcycles, airplanes and other engine fitted devices. They are also used on some wood stoves to control emissions.[6] This is usually in response to government regulation, either through direct environmental regulation or through health and safety regulations.

Catalytic oxidization is also used, but for the purpose of safe, flameless generation of heat rather than destruction of pollutants, in catalytic heater
 
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